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THE CRY OF

BALINTAWAK
AND BUKAD
LAWIN
Joyce Anne B. Egango
THE CRY OF BALINTAWAK AND PUGADLAWIN
 The Cry of Balintawak (Filipino: Sigaw ng Balíntawak, Spanish: Grito de Balíntawak),
was the beginning of the Philippine Revolution against the Spanish Empire.
 At the close of August 1896, members of the Katipunan secret society (Katipuneros) led
by Andrés Bonifacio rose up in revolt somewhere in an area referred to as Caloocan,
wider than the jurisdiction of present-day Caloocan City which may have overlapped
into present-day Quezon City.
 Originally the term cry referred to the first clash between the Katipuneros and the Civil
Guards (Guardia Civil). The cry could also refer to the tearing up of community tax
certificates (cédulas personales) in defiance of their allegiance to Spain. The inscriptions
of "Viva la Independencia Filipina" can also be referred as term for the cry. This was
literally accompanied by patriotic shouts.
WHEN AND WHERE DID IT REALLY HAPPEN?
Different dates and places
Various accounts give differing dates and places for the Cry of Pugad Lawin. An officer of the Spanish
guardia civil, Lt. Olegario Diaz, stated that the Cry took place in Balintawak on August 25, 1896.
Historian Teodoro Kalaw in his 1925 book The Filipino Revolution wrote that the event took place during
the last week of August 1896 at Kangkong, Balintawak. Santiago Alvarez, a Katipunero and son of
Mariano Alvarez, the leader of the Magdiwang faction in Cavite, stated in 1927 that the Cry took place in
Bahay Toro, now in Quezon City on August 24, 1896. Pío Valenzuela, a close associate of Andrés
Bonifacio, declared in 1948 that it happened in Pugad Lawin on August 23, 1896. Historian Gregorio
Zaide stated in his books in 1954 that the "Cry" happened in Balintawak on August 26, 1896.Fellow
historian Teodoro Agoncillo wrote in 1956 that it took place in Pugad Lawin on August 23, 1896, based
on Pío Valenzuela's statement. Accounts by historians Milagros Guerrero, Emmanuel Encarnacion and
Ramon Villegas claim the event to have taken place in Tandang Sora's barn in Gulod, Barangay Banlat,
Quezon City.

Some of the apparent confusion is in part due to the double meanings of the terms "Balintawak" and
"Caloocan" at the turn of the century. Balintawak referred both to a specific place in modern Caloocan
City and a wider area which included parts of modern Quezon City. Similarly, Caloocan referred to
modern Caloocan City and also a wider area which included modern Quezon City and part of modern
Pasig. Pugad Lawin, Pasong Tamo, Kangkong and other specific places were all in "greater Balintawak",
which was in turn part of "greater Caloocan"
Events Prior to the Cry of Pugad Lawin
 These events vitalized the unity of the Filipino People and brought "thirst" for independence. The Cry
of the Rebellion in Pugad Lawin, marked the start of the Philippine Revolution in 1896 which
eventually led to Independence of the country in 1898.
WHY PUGAD LAWIN WAS NOT ESTABLISHED?