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http://www.physicsclassroom.com/mmedia/circmot/circmotTOC.html

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Object repeatedly
finds itself back where
it started.

The time it takes to


travel one ³cycle´ is
the ³period´.
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Ôlways points toward center of circle.
(Ôlways changing direction!)

Centripetal force is the magnitude of the force


required to maintain uniform circular motion.
^
irection of Centripetal Force,
Ôcceleration and Velocity

Without a centripetal Without a centripetal


force, an object in force, an object in
motion continues along motion continues along
a straight-line path. a straight-line path. ÿ
irection of Centripetal Force,
Ôcceleration and Velocity

‰
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[     


 Tension
‡ Gravity
‡ Friction
‡ Normal Force

Centripetal force is NOT a new ³force´. It is simply a


way of quantifying the magnitude of the force
required to maintain a certain speed around a circular
path of a certain radius.

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If the person doubles the


speed of the airplane,
what happens to the
tension in the cable?

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oubling the speed, quadruples the force (i.e.


tension) required to keep the plane in uniform circular
motion. |^
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What is the maximum
speed that a car can use
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Ô car travels at a constant


speed around two curves.
Where is the car most likely to
skid? Why?
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ëmaller radius: larger force
required to keep it in uniform
circular motion.
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Centripetal acceleration provided by gravitational force

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Engineers have learned to ³bank´ curves so that


cars can safely travel around the curve without
relying on friction at all to supply the centripetal
acceleration.

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ow to bank a curve«

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«so that you don¶t rely on friction at all!!



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