Sie sind auf Seite 1von 22

TOPIC:  ISSUES BWETWEEN THE 

BEGINNING and END OF LIFE 
      V.  Pediatric Issues
•                 I.  Different Congenital Anomalies
•                                 1.  Intrauterine Screening                             -              Karen
•                                 2.  After birth Screening                               -               Ten
•                                 3.  Congenital and Genetic Anomalies     -                Riza
•                                 4.  Treatment                                                -              Ivan
•                 
•                 II.  Proxy Consent                                                        -              Chub
•                 III.  Neonatal Issues
• 1.        Ethical Issues                                            -              Kunny
• 2.       Social Issues                                               -              Michee
• IV.  Principles Involved                                                  -              Alvin
• V.  Case Presentation                                                     - ALL.. we need to talk about 
it, whats our final plan?
Genetic and Congenital 
Impairments
2 Kinds of Errors
• Genetic errors
– Occurrence of mutation in the coding of DNA 
or presence of inherited defective gene
• Congenital errors
– Errors that result during the developmental 
process 
– Impairment is not in the original blueprint but 
maybe from genetic damage or imcorrect 
reading of the blueprint
Factors affecting fetal development
• Radiation (x-rays)
• Drugs (thalidomide)
• Chemicals (mercury)
• Nutritional deficiencies
• Biological diseases (viruses or 
spirochetes)
Genetic and Congenital Errors
• Genetic impairments are inherited
• Congenital impairments are not inherited 
and cannot be passed on
• Some genetic diseases can be diagnosed 
before birth
Diagnosing before birth
• Blood test for presence of alphafetoprotein 
can indicate likelihood of neural tube 
defects characteristic of spina bifida
• Ultrasound can be used to confirm or 
detect developmental abnormalities
• Amniocentesis, procedure for drawing fluid 
from uterus and cells from developing 
embryo are examined for genetic 
abnormalities.
Down Syndrome
• Genetic disease identified in 1886 by 
english physician J.L.H. Down
• Results from the presence an additional 
chromosome from the 23-pairs
• Also called Trisomy-21 because instead of 
the 21st pair of chromosome, the affected 
person has a 21st triple.
Effects of Down Syndrome
• Child is born with retardation and various 
physical abnormalities (broad skull, large 
tongue and upward slant of eyelids)
• Upward slant of eyelids led to the name 
“mongolism”
• There is no cure for down syndrome, no 
way to compensate for the abnormality in 
the development
Occurrence of Down Syndrome
• Occurs in 1 of every 1000 births
• Occurs most frequently in woman over the 
age of 35
• In 1984 researchers discovered an extra 
copy of a segment known as “nucleolar 
organizing region”
• Families in which either parent has the 
abnormality are 20 times more likely to 
have an affected child
Down Syndrome affected 
characteristics
• Usually carries a 50-80 IQ
• Usually requires the care and help of 
others
• Can be taught easy tasks
• Usually seem to be happy people
Spina Bifida
• General name for birth defects that involves an 
opening in the spine
• Spine of the child fails to fuse properly and often 
the open vertebrae permit the membrane 
covering the spinal cord to protrude to the 
outside
• Membrane forms a bulging, thin sac that 
contains spinal fluid and nerve tissue
• When nerve tissue is present, condition is called 
“myelomeningocele”, a severe form of spina 
bifida
Treatment of Spina Bifida
• Spina bifida must often be treated 
surgically
• Opening in the spine must be closed up
• Sac is removed and nerve tissue inside is 
placed within the spinal canal
• Normal skin is grafted over the area
• Danger of infection of the meninges 
(meningitis) is great, thus antibiotics is 
also necessary
Treatment of Spina Bifida
• Child is also likely to require orthopedic 
operations to attempt to correct the 
deformities of the legs and feet because of 
muscle weakness and lack of muscular 
control due to nerve damage
• Bones of such children are thin and brittle, 
fractures are frequent
Effects of Spina Bifida
• Child is virtually paralyzed to some extent, 
usually below waist
• Because of nerve damage, child will have limited 
sensation in the lower part of the body
• No control over his bladder of bowels
• Lack of bladder control may result in infection of 
the bladder, urinary tract, and kidneys, because 
undischarged urine may serve as breeding place 
for microorganisms
Occurrence of Spina Bifida
• Occurs between one and ten per 1000 births
• Rate in white families of low socio-economic 
status is 3 times higher than that in families of 
higher socio-economic status
• Rate in black population is less than half of that 
in the white population
• Women taking multivitamins during pregnancy 
ran less than half the risk of having an affected 
child
• Spina bifida is almost always accompanied by 
hydrocephaly
Hydrocephaly
• Literally means “water on the brain”
• When the flow of fluid through the spinal canal is 
blocked, the cerebrospinal fluid produced within 
the brain cannot escape
• Pressure buildup from the fluid can cause brain 
damage, and when not released, the child will 
die
• It is frequently a result of spina bifida, it may also 
have several other causes and can develop late 
in a child’s life
Treatment of Hydrocephaly
• Treatment requires surgically inserting a 
thin tube, or shunt, to drain the fluid from 
the skull to the heart or abdomen where it 
can be absorbed.
• Operation can save the baby’s life but 
physical and mental damage is frequent
• If hydrocephaly comes with spina bifida, it 
is always treated first
Anencephaly
• Literally means “without brain”
• Defect is related to spina bifida, for in some 
forms the bones of the skull are not completely 
formed and leave an opening through which 
brain material bulges to the outside
• Death is a virtual certainty
• Individuals is so severely retarded that he has 
minimum control over bodily movements
• No hope for improvement by any known means
Esophageal Atresia
• Atresia is the closing of a normal opening 
or canal
• Esophagus is the muscular tube that 
extends from the back of the throat to the 
stomach
• Sometimes the tube forms without an 
opening, or it does not completely develop 
so that it does not extend to the stomach
Treating Esophageal Atresia
• Surgery is needed to correct the condition
• Chances of success in such surgery is 
very high
Duodenal Atresia
• Duodenum is the upper part of the small 
intestine
• Food from the stomach empties into it
• When the duodenum is closed off, food 
cannot pass through and be digested
• Surgery can repair this condition and is 
successful in most cases
Occurrence of all defects
• Estimated 6% of all live births, some 200,000 
infants a year require intensive neonatal care
• Afflictions presented here are those that are 
most often the source of major moral problems
• Those correctable by standard surgical 
procedures present no special moral difficulties 
but when paired with other impairments such as 
Down Syndrome, they become important factors 
in moral deliberations