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Fish
A fish is any aquatic vertebrate animal that

is covered with scales, and equipped with two sets of paired fins and several unpaired fins. Most fish are exothermic (or coldblooded). Fish are abundant in most bodies of water. Fish are found in high mountain streams (e.g., char and gudgeon) and in the deepest ocean depths (e.g., gulpers and anglerfish).

Alaska Blackfish

Archerfish

Alaska Blackfish
The Alaska blackfish, Dallia pectoralis, is

a fish that grows to 7" in length. It is elongate and cylindrical, with a dark olive-brown coloration. Four to six dark blotches run vertically along the sides, and the belly is white.

The fins have reddish-brown speckles. They are found in swamps, ponds,

lakes and streams with vegetation for cover, in tundra and forested locations not far inland. Their range is Alaska and the Bering Sea islands.

Archerfish
The archerfish (Spinner Fish or Archer

Fish) are a family (Toxotidae) of fish known for their habit of preying on land based insects and other small animals by literally shooting them down with water droplets from their specialized mouths.

The family is a small one, consisting

of seven species in the genus Toxotes; all occur in fresh, brackish, and marine deep pool like waters from India to the Philippines, Australia, and Polynesia. It reproduces by the male putting its sperm in the female and the female lays eggs which hatch in 5 months.

Boxfish

Burbot

Boxfishes
The boxfishes are a family, Ostraciidae, of squared, bony fish belonging to the order Tetraodontiformes, closely related to the pufferfish and filefishes. Fish in the family are known

variously as boxfishes, cofferfishes, cowfishes and trunkfishes. Boxfishes occupy the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific oceans, generally at middle latitudes, although the common or buffalo trunkfish which lives mainly in Florida waters may be found as far north as Cape Cod.

Burbot
The burbot (Lota lota) is the only freshwater gadiform

fish. It is also known as the lawyer, and (misleadingly) eelpout, and closely related to the common ling and the cusk. It is the only member of the genus Lota.The genus and species name "lota" comes from "la lotte," the old French word for "codfish". The InuktitutIupiaq word for burbot was used to name the recently discovered extinct transitional species Tiktaalik.

Carp
Carp is a common name for various

species of an oily freshwater fish of the family Cyprinidae, a very large group of fish native to Europe and Asia. Some consider all cyprinid fishes carp, and the family Cyprinidae itself is often known as the carp family.

In colloquial use, however, carp usually

refers only to several larger cyprinid species such as Cyprinus carpio, Carassius carassius , Ctenopharyngodon idella, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix , and Hypophthalmichthys nobilis. Carp have long been an important food fish to humans, as well as popular ornamental fishes such as the various goldfish breeds and the domesticated common carp variety known as koi.

Cutlassfish
The cutlassfishes are about 40 species of

predatory fish in the family Trichiuridae found in seas throughout the world. Fish of this family are long, slender, and generally steely blue or silver in colour, giving rise to their name.

They have reduced or absent pelvic and

caudal fins, giving them an eel-like appearance, and large fang-like teeth. Some species are known as scabbardfishes or hairtails or Walla Walla; others are called frostfishes because they appear in late autumn and early winter, around the time of the first frosts.

Carp

CutlassFish

Delta Smelt
Delta smelt, Hypomesus transpacificus, are slenderbodied smelts, about 5 to 7 cm (2.0 to 2.8 in) long, of the Osmeridae family. They have a steely blue sheen on the sides and seem almost translucent. Smelts live together in schools and feed on zooplankton (small fishes and invertebrates).

One female may lay from 1,400 to 1,800 eggs. Mature unfertilized eggs are about 1 mm (0.039 in).

Dragonfish
The black dragonfish is part of the Malacosteid

family. This fish has bioluminescent capabilities. The black dragonfish, unlike almost all the other bioluminescent organisms in the ocean, can glow and perceive a red or blue-green light.
Most other marine organisms glow blue because that wavelength of light transmits furthest underwater and most marine organisms lack the pigments which can

absorb longer or shorter wavelegths of light and are sensitive only to blue light.

The light of the black dragonfish can be such

long wavelengths that it is nearly infrared and barely visible to the human eye. This fish can shine a light to avoid predators or search for prey that does not alert the prey or the predator to the presence of the fish since they cannot see the light the black dragonfish shines.

Delta Smelt

Dragonfish

Eagle ray
The eagle rays are a group of cartilaginous fishes

in the family Myliobatidae, consisting mostly of large species living in the open ocean rather than on the sea bottom. The taxonomy of this group is uncertain; it is placed either in the order Myliobatiformes or Rajiformes. There are eight genera belonging to the eagle rays: Myliobatis, Rhinoptera, Pteromylaeus , Aetobatus, Aetomylaeus, Californica , Mobula, and Manta.

Eulachon
The eulachon, also hooligan, ooligan, or

candlefish, is a small anadromous ocean fish, Thaleichthys pacificus, a smelt found along the Pacific coast of North America from northern California to Alaska. The common names of this fish have a somewhat confusing relationship.

The name "candlefish" derives from the

fact that it is so fat during spawning, with up to 15% of total body weight in fat, that if caught, dried, and strung on a wick, it can be burned as a candle. This is the name most often used by early explorers. The name "eulachon" is from the Chinookan language and the Chinook jargon based on that language.

Eagle ray

Eulachon

French Angelfish

The French angela, Pomacanthus paru, is a large

angelfish of the family Pomacanthidae, found in the western Atlantic from Florida and the Bahamas to Brazil, and also the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, including the Antilles, and the eastern Atlantic from around Ascension Island and St. Paul's Rocks, at depths of between 2 and 100 m. The French angelfish is common in shallow reefs, occurs usually in pairs often near sea fans. It feeds on sponges, algae, bryozoans, zoantharians, gorgonians and tunicates.

Juveniles tend cleaning stations where

they service a broad range of clients, including jacks, snappers, morays, grunts, surgeonfishes, and wrasses. At the station the cleaner displays a fluttering swimming and when cleaning it touches the clients with its pelvic fins.

Frilled Shark
The frilled shark, Chlamydoselachus

anguineus, is a species of deep-sea shark in the family Chlamydoselachidae, regarded as a "living fossil". It was long thought to be the only member of its family, until in 2009 frilled sharks off southern Africa were described as a separate species, C. africana.

These species are very different from the other hexanchiform sharks, and it

has recently been proposed that the two frilled sharks should be given their own order, Chlamydoselachiformes.

French Angelfish

Frilled Shark

Giant Gourami
The Giant Gourami (Osphronemus

goramy) is a gourami, a freshwater fish belonging to the family Osphronomidae. Some other larger members of this family are also occasionally or regionally referred to as "giant gouramis", including the banded gourami, Polyacanthus fasciatus, and the three spot gourami, Trichogaster trichopterus.

Giant Gourami build nests using weeds and

twigs. Female Giant Gourami can be identified by their thicker lips. The Giant Gourami is native to parts of Indochina, Malaysia , Indonesia and India, but has been introduced elsewhere for the purpose of aquaculture. In turn the giant gourami is also sometimes known as the banded gourami, rainbow gourami, or striped gourami.

Goatfish
Goatfishes are tropical marine perciform fish of

the family Mullidae. Seldom found in brackish waters, goatfish are most associated with the reefs of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. The goatfish are sometimes called the red mullets as opposed to the Mugilidae, the grey mullets, though that name is usually reserved for the red mullets of the genus Mullus of the Mediterranean. Within the family are approximately six genera and 55 species.

Gourami

Goatfish

Hagfish
Hagfish are marine craniates of the class

Myxini, also known as Hyperotreti. Myxini is the only class in the clade Craniata that does not also belong to the subphylum Vertebrata. That is, they are the only animals which have a skull but not a vertebral column.

Despite their name, there is some debate about

whether they are strictly fish (as there is for lampreys), since they belong to a much more primitive lineage than any other group that is placed in the category of fish (Chondrichthyes and Osteichthyes). Their unusual feeding habits and slimeproducing capabilities have led members of the scientific and popular media to dub the hagfish as the most "disgusting" of all sea creatures. Although hagfish are sometimes called "slime eels," they are not eels at all.

Hamlet
A hamlet is a fish of the genus

Hypoplectrus that is found mainly in coral reefs in the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico, particularly around Florida and the Bahamas. They are a popular choice for hobbyist saltwater aquariums, and come in a variety of colors.

Hagfish

Hamlet

Ide
The ide (also id) or orfe, Leuciscus idus, is

a freshwater fish of the family Cyprinidae found across northern Europe and Asia. It occurs in larger rivers, ponds, and lakes, typically in schools. The name is from Swedish id, originally referring to its bright color (compare the German dialect word aitel 'a kind of bright fish' and Old High German eit 'funeral pyre, fire').

The body has a typical cyprinid shape

and generally silvery appearance, while the fins are a pinkish red in varying degrees. The tail and backfin can be greyish. In older and bigger fish the body color can turn to yellow/bronze.

Inconnu
The inconnu or sheefish (Stenodus

leucichthys), also known as "Coney" in the Canadian North, is a large salmonid fish, closely related to the freshwater whitefishes in the genus Coregunus. The main distribution of inconnu is in the north-bound drainages of North America and Eurasia, but a distinct stock also inhabits rivers draining to the Caspian Sea.

Ide

Inconnu

Jawfish
Opistognathidae (opisto = "behind", gnath =

"mouth"), commonly referred to as jawfishes, are classified within Order Perciformes, Suborder Percoidei. They are found throughout shallow reef areas of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and the Gulf of Mexico. Physically similar to blennies, jawfish are generally smaller-sized fish with an elongated body plan.

Their heads, mouths, and eyes are

large in size relative to the rest of their bodies. Jawfish possess a single, long dorsal fin with 9-12 spines and a caudal fin that can be either rounded or pointed.

Jellynose Fish
The jellynose fishes or tadpole fishes are

the small order Ateleopodiformes. This group of ray-finned fish is monotypic, containing a single family Ateleopodidae. It has about one dozen species in four genera, but these enigmatic fishes are in need of taxonomic revision.

Jawfish

Jellynose Fish

Kissing Gourami
Kissing gouramis, also known as kissers (Helostoma temminckii), are large tropical freshwater fish comprising the monotypic labyrinth fish family Helostomatidae (from the

Greek elos [stud, nail], stoma [mouth]). These fish originate from Thailand to Indonesia. They are highly commercial food fish which are farmed in their native Southeast Asia. They are used fresh for steaming, baking, broiling, and pan frying.

Koi

Koi, or more specifically nishikigoi , are

ornamental domesticated varieties of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) that are kept for decorative purposes in outdoor ponds and water gardens. They are also called Japanese carp. Koi were developed from common carp in Japan in the 1820s, and are still popular there because they are a symbol of love and friendship.

A variety of colors and color patterns

have since been developed; common colors include white, black, red, yellow, blue, and cream. The most popular category of koi is the Gosanke, which is made up of the Kohaku, Taisho Sanshoku, and Showa Sanshoku varieties.

Kissing Gourami

Koi

Lake Trout
Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) is a

freshwater char living mainly in lakes in northern North America. Other names for it include mackinaw, lake char (or charr), touladi, togue, and grey trout. In Lake Superior, they can also be variously known as siscowet, paperbellies and leans. Lake trout are prized both as game fish and as food fish.

LanternFish
Lanternfishes (or myctophids, from the

Greek mykter, "nose" and ophis, "serpent") are small, deep sea fish of the large family Myctophidae. One of two families in the order Myctophiformes, the Myctophidae are represented by 246 species in 33 genera, and are found in oceans worldwide. They are aptly named after their conspicuous use of bioluminescence.

Their sister family, the

Neoscopelidae, are much fewer in number but superficially very similar; at least one neoscopelid shares the common name 'lanternfish': the large-scaled lantern fish, Neoscopelus macrolepidotus.

Lake Trout

Lantern Fish

Marlin
Marlin, Istiophoridae, is a "billfish" and is closely linked to freshwater trout. A marlin has an elongated body, a spear-like snout or bill, and a long rigid dorsal fin, which extends forward to form a crest. Its common name is thought to derive from its resemblance to a sailor's marlinspike. Even more so than their close relatives the scombrids, marlin are incredibly fast swimmers, reaching speeds of about 110 kilometres per hour (68 mph)

Midshipman fish
The midshipman fishes are the genus

Porichthys of toadfishes. They are distinguished by having photophores (which they use to attract prey and after which they are named, reminding some of a naval uniform's buttons) and four lateral lines.

Typical midshipman fishes, such as

the Plainfin Midshipman, are nocturnal and bury themselves in sand or mud of the intertidal zone during the day. At night they float just above the seabed. Some species are armed with venomous dorsal spines and are capable of inflicting serious injuries if handled.

Marlin

Midshipman Fish

Naked-back Knifefish
The naked-back knifefishes are a family

(Gymnotidae) of knifefishes that are found only in fresh waters of Central America and South America. All have organs adapted to the exploitation of bioelectricity. The family has 33 valid species in two genera.

There are a number of undescribed

species known in museum collections. These fish are nocturnal and mostly occur in quiet waters from deep rivers to swamps. In strongly-flowing waters they may bury themselves.

Northern Stargazer
The Northern Stargazer (Astroscopus guttatus) is a fish that can reach lengths of 22in (56 cm) and are located on the eastern shores between the

states of North Carolina and New York United States. The Northern Stargazer can be found up to depths of 120ft (36 m). Stargazers have a flat forehead with a lot of body mass up front near the mouth.

Naked-back Knifefish

Northern Stargazer

Oarfish
Oarfish are large, greatly elongated, pelagic

Lampriform comprising the small family Regalecidae. Found in all temperate to tropical oceans yet rarely seen, the oarfish family contains four species in two genera. One of these, the king of herrings (Regalecus glesne), is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest bony fish alive, at up to 11 metres (36 ft) in length.

Olive Flounder
The Olive flounder or Bastard halibut

(Paralichthys olivaceus) is a species of largetooth flounder native to the north-western Pacific Ocean. It is often referred to as the Japanese flatfish when mentioned in the context of those countries. It is the most common flatfish species raised in aquaculture in Korea. They are raised in Japan and China as well.

Oarfish

Olive Flounder

Pacific Cod

The Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus,

is an important commercial food species. It is also known as gray cod, gray goo, gray wolf, grayest or grayfish. It has three separate dorsal fins, and the catfish-like whiskers on its lower jaw.

In appearance, it is similar to the Atlantic

Cod. A bottom dweller, it is found mainly along the continental shelf and upper slopes with a range around the rim of the North Pacific Ocean, from the Yellow Sea to the Bering Strait, along the Aleutian Islands, and south to about Los Angeles, down to the depths of 900 meters. May grow up to 4849 cm and weigh up to 15 kg. It is found in huge schools.

Paddlefish
Paddlefish (family Polyodontidae) are

primitive Chondrostean ray-finned fishes. The paddlefish can be distinguished by its large mouth and its elongated snout called a rostrum (bill). These spatula-like snouts comprise half the length of their entire body.

There are only two extant species of

these fish: the Chinese and the American paddlefish. The American species is Missouri's State Aquatic Animal.

Pacific Cod

Paddlefish

Quillback
The quillback is a type of freshwater fish of

the sucker family. It grows to 26 inches (65 cm) and are deeper bodied than most suckers, leading to a carplike appearance. It can be distinguished from carp by the lack of barbels around the mouth. The coloration is silvery and it has large scales. It is called quillback because of the long filament that extends back from the dorsal fin.

The species is widely distributed in the

eastern and central United States and is found most often in rivers, creeks and clear lakes where there is loose bottom. It feeds on insect larvae and other organisms in the sediment.

Quillfish
The quillfish, Ptilichthys goodei, is a species of

perciform fish, the only species in the genus Ptilichthys and family Ptilichthyidae. It is an elongate eel-like fish that reaches 34 cm in length. It is native to the north Pacific Ocean, from the Bering Sea down to Oregon. It has been found on the surface at night, attracted by the lights of fishing boats, but little is known about its daytime habits: it is thought that it may burrow in sandy and muddy bottoms during the day, emerging at dusk to feed.

Quillback

Quillfish

Rabbitfish
Rabbitfishes or spinefoots are perciform fishes in

the family Siganidae. There are 28 species in a single genus, Siganus. In some classifications, the species with prominent face stripes colloquially called foxfaces are separated in the genus Lo. But this is now known to be erroneous; indeed some other species like the Masked Spinefoot show a reduced form of the stripe pattern. Rabbitfishes are found in shallow lagoons in the Indo-Pacific and eastern Mediterranean.

Raccoon Butterflyfish
The raccoon butterflyfish, Chaetodon lunula,

also known as the crescent-masked butterflyfish or lunule butterflyfish, is a species of butterflyfish. It is found in the Indo-Pacific region and in the southeast Atlantic. Its length is up to 20 cm (nearly 8 in).

Rabbitfish

Raccoon Butterflyfish

Sabertooth fish
Sabertooth fishes (also spelt sabretooth)

are small, fierce-looking deep-sea aulopiform fish comprising the family Evermannellidae. The family is small, with just eight species in three genera represented; they are distributed throughout tropical to subtropical waters of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Ocean.

Sablefish

The sablefish, Anoplopoma fimbria, is one of

two members of the fish family Anoplopomatidae and the only species in the Anoplopoma genus. In English it is also called sable (USA), butterfish (USA/Australia), black cod (UK, Canada), blue cod (UK), bluefish (UK), candlefish (UK), coal cod (UK), and coalfish (Canada), although many of these names also refer to other species.

Sabertooth Fish

Sablefish

Thornfish

The thornfishes are a family, Bovichtidae, of

fishes in the order Perciformes. The family is spelled Bovichthyidae in J. S. Nelson's Fishes of the World. They are native to coastal waters off Australia, New Zealand, and South America, and to rivers and lakes of southeast Australia and Tasmania. Phylogenetic analysis of morphological characters has revealed that the family Bovichtidae is not a monophyletic group.

Tube-eye fish
The tube-eye or thread-tail, Stylephorus

chordatus, is a deep-sea Stylephoriformes fish, the only fish in the genus Stylephorus and family Stylephoridae. It is found in deep subtropical and tropical waters around the world, living at depths during the day and making nightly vertical migrations to feed on plankton.

It is an extremely elongated fish:

although its body grows only to 28 centimetres (11 in) long, it has a pair of tail fin rays that triple its length to about 90 centimetres (35 in). Its eyes are tubular in shape, resembling a pair of binoculars.

Thornfish

Tube-eye Fish

Unicorn Grenadier

The Unicorn grenadier Caelorinchus

productus is a species of rattail. This fish is found at depths of up to 600 m in the waters around northern Taiwan, southern Japan and the East China Sea. This fish grows to a length of about 31 cm and is generally brown above, silvery below, with blackish fins and mouth and gill cavities. It can be distinguished from its congeners by its fairly long, pointed snout, teeth restricted to the central premaxilla and by only having a small ventral bioluminescent organ.

Velvetfishsimply velvetfishes are a family, the Little velvetfishes or

Aploactinidae, of scorpaeniform fishes. As the name implies, they are small fish, that have skin with a velvet texture. They are generally flattened in shape, with small pelvic fins, and a fleshy pad under the head, which, in at least one species, forms a sucker for attaching the fish to the sea floor. Some also have venomous spines. They live on the sea bottom close to the shore, at depths of up to 100 metres (330 ft).

Viperfish
A viperfish is a deepwater fish in the genus

Chauliodus, with long, needle-like teeth and hinged lower jaws. They grow to lengths of 30 to 60 cm (12 - 24 inches). Viperfish stay near lower depths ( 250-5000 feet) in the daytime and shallow at night. Viperfish mainly stay in tropical and temperate waters. It is one of the fiercest predators in the very deep part of the sea and is believed to attack its prey by luring the victim close to its self with a light producing organ.

Velvetfish

Viperfish

Wahoo
The wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri) is a dark blue

scombrid fish found worldwide in tropical and subtropical seas. Its speed and high-quality flesh make it a prize game fish. In Hawaii, the fish is known as ono. Hispanic areas of the Caribbean and Central America call it Peto.

Walking Catfish is a species of The walking catfish, Clarias batrachus,


freshwater airbreathing catfish found primarily in Southeast Asia, so named for its ability to "walk" across dry land, to find food or suitable environments. While it does not truly walk as most bipeds or quadrupeds do, it has the ability to use its pectoral fins to keep it upright as it makes a sort of wiggling motion with snakelike movements.

It can survive using this form of

locomotion as long as it stays moist. This fish normally lives in slow-moving and often stagnant waters in ponds, swamps, streams and rivers (Mekong and Chao Phraya basins), flooded rice paddies or temporary pools which may dry up. When this happens, its "walking" skill comes in handy for moving to other sources of water.

Wahoo

Walking Catfish

X-ray Fish
Pristella maxillaris is the only species in the

genus Pristella and is commonly known as the golden pristella tetra or x-ray tetra because of its highly transparent body. It is a widely distributed and adaptable fish, being found in coastal rivers of Brazil, Guiana, Guyana, and Venezuela in both acidic and alkaline waters. Unlike most other characins, it is tolerant of (and sometimes found in) slightly brackish water.

It is small (around 5 cm) and lives in

large groups, and males can be distinguished from females by being smaller and thinner than the females. Like most other tetras, it feeds primarily on small insects and planktonic animals.

X-ray Fish

Yellow-and-black Triplefin
The yellow-and-black triplefin, Forsterygion

flavonigrum, a triplefin of the genus Forsterygion, is found around the north of the North Island of New Zealand at depths of between 15 and 30 m, in reef areas of broken rock. Its length is between 4 to 7 cm. Its non-breeding colouration is a pale pinkish head with a yellowish body and tail, with a black mask across the eyes which continues in a stripe down the centre of the body gradually changing to a darker yellow.

The breeding colouration is

spectacular - the head and tail become black, while the rest of the body becomes bright yellow. Yellow-and-black triplefins guard their nest. After spawning the nonbreeding colours rapidly return.

Yellowtail clownfish
Clark's anemonefish or the Yellowtail

clownfish (Amphiprion clarkii) is a widely distributed clownfish. It is found in tropical waters, in lagoons and on outer reef slopes, from the Persian Gulf to Western Australia and throughout the Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean as far as Melanesia and Micronesia, and as far north as Taiwan, southern Japan and the Ryukyu Islands.

Yellow-and-black Triplefin

Yellowtail Clownfish

Zander
Zander is a species of fish. The scientific

name is Sander lucioperca (or Stizostedion lucioperca), and it is closely allied to perch. Zander are often called pike-perch as they resemble the pike with their elongated body and head, and the perch with their spiny dorsal fin. Zander are not, as is commonly believed, a pike and perch hybrid.

Zebra Turkeyfish
The Zebra turkeyfish or Zebra lionfish,

Dendrochirus zebra, is a carnivorous rayfinned fish with venomous spines that lives in the Indian and western Pacific oceans. This member of the scorpion fish family has thirteen venomous spines along its back, used to defend itself. These fish are slow-moving and peaceful, but can be dangerous.

They have a habit of resting in places

hidden from light such as under a rock or a piece of coral. They are immune to each other's poison. They are solitary fish that aren't afraid of anything, as they have no natural predators.

Zander

Zebra Turkeyfish

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