MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History13 min gelesen
Fort And Fortitude
On July 6, 1864, a large contingent of Union soldiers, many hefting picks and shovels, marched to a point just west of Jerusalem Plank Road, a mile south of the Confederate earthworks protecting Petersburg, Virginia. Army engineers had been busy layi
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History1 min gelesen
Armed And Dangerous
Hand grenades have been around for more than 1,000 years, but by the turn of the 20th century they were seen as virtually obsolete adjuncts of warfare, mostly because of the assortment of dangers they posed to those using them in battle. In 1902 the
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History1 min gelesen
The 2020 Thomas Fleming Award
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History is pleased to invite submissions for the 2020 Thomas Fleming Award, named for an esteemed historian who was a valued contributor to MHQ in a writing career spanning more than 50 years. For the past three
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History16 min gelesen
Obsessed With The Occult
In March 1940, Hans Bender, Germany’s best-known parapsychologist, wrote to Karl Ernst Krafft, a young Swiss astrologer he had known since his days as a doctoral student at the University of Bonn a decade earlier. Krafft had recently ingratiated hims
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History2 min gelesen
Opening Round
For 292 days, beginning on June 15, 1864, Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant, the overall commander of Union forces in what turned out to be the last big offensive campaign of the Civil War, sought to suffocate Confederate general Robert E. Lee’s ar
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History11 min gelesen
‘Meet Me At The Canteen’
Picture a GI from the heartland, on leave with a day or two in New York City in the summer of 1942. Lonely, he wanders into Times Square and is overwhelmed by the lights, the traffic, the people with someplace to go. Glancing down a side street, thou
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History1 min gelesen
Flashback
Spanish conquistadores led by Hernán Cortés (with beard) flee Tenochtitlán, which they have occupied for nearly eight months, after a ferocious battle with Aztec warriors. TODAY: Archaeologists confirm that a large gold ingot found beneath a Mexico C
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History1 min gelesen
Culture Of War
American modernist Jacob Lawrence originally intended to portray pivotal moments in U.S. history, from the American Revolution to World War I, in 60 tempera-on-board paintings, but he ended up completing only half of them. A new exhibition, Jacob Law
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History4 min gelesen
Abilities And Disabilities
I always like to read about interesting personalities from the Civil War, and certainly one of the most interesting is Union major general Daniel E. Sickles, the subject of Rick Britton’s article, “The Antihero of Gettysburg,” in the Winter 2020 issu
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History5 min gelesen
The Death Train
Peggy Hull was born Henrietta Eleanor Goodnough on a farm near Bennington, Kansas, in 1889. Fascinated by geography since childhood and picturing newspaper work as the best way to “see the world,” she left school at age 16 to become a typesetter for
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History1 min gelesen
Historynet
MICHAEL A. REINSTEIN CHAIRMAN & PUBLISHER DAVID STEINHAFEL PUBLISHER ALEX NEILL EDITOR IN CHIEF THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF MILITARY HISTORY SUMMER 2020 VOL. 32, NO. 4 EDITOR BILL HOGAN ELIZABETH G. HOWARD CONSULTING EDITOR JON GUTTMAN RESEARCH DIRECTOR
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History8 min gelesen
The Duelist
John M. Daniel, the editor of the Richmond Examiner, sat alone in his office as he waited for the poet to arrive. Earlier, they had discussed the possibility of the writer contributing to the newspaper. But they were much alike, these two—brilliant,
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History1 min gelesen
At The Front
At the end of a five-day trip from England, nearly 15,000 cheering American GIs—mostly members of the Eighth Air Force—pack the decks of the RMS Queen Elizabeth as it pulls into New York Harbor on August 11, 1945. Called into service as a troop trans
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History2 min gelesen
‘Beautiful Still’
Leslie Coulson was born in London in 1889. His father was a columnist for the Sunday Chronicle, and Coulson, after graduating from boarding school, followed in his father’s footsteps, becoming a reporter for the London Evening News. In 1914 he moved
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History8 min gelesen
‘The Cavalry Of The Future’
On February 11, 1933, Adolf Hitler strode into Berlin’s vast “Hall of Honor” to open the city’s International Motor Show. As he stood on a high, well-lit podium, dressed in a black suit, silence fell over the crowd inside. Hitler had become Germany’s
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History9 min gelesen
The Irreverent Anthem
It was time for the second act on the second day of a music festival at a sprawling dairy farm in upstate New York in August 1969, but Santana, a relatively unknown band scheduled to go on stage next, was having trouble getting it together. So the em
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History8 min gelesen
Mutiny!
In January 1766 the Dutch East India Company ship Meermin left Madagascar with about 140 slaves destined for servitude at a burgeoning settlement in what is now part of Cape Town, South Africa. Days into the 1,700-mile journey, Meermin’s novice capta
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History1 min gelesen
Big Shots
Peyton C. March wasn’t a man to mess around. When he became the U.S. Army’s chief of staff in March 1918, he was appalled that in the 10 months since the United States had entered World War I, fewer than 250,000 men had been deployed to France. “I am
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History1 min gelesen
Target: Baikal
From 1868 to 1945 the Imperial Japanese Army produced thousands of secret military maps known as gaihozu (“maps of outer lands”). The U.S. Army seized them during the Allied occupation of Japan at the end of World War II. This section of a 1944 map o
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History9 min gelesen
Complex Napoleon
By Alexander Mikaberidze. Oxford University Press, 2020. $39.95. Reviewed by Michael V. Leggiere Every half century or so comes a book in a particular field or area of history that is monumental, that immediately becomes the authority on that subject
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History10 min gelesen
‘Traitors Must Die’
Born in Manchester, England, in 1914, Harry Rée was the son of an industrial chemist from a Jewish family and an American-born heiress to the du Pont chemical fortune. As a student at Cambridge University in the 1930s, he signed the Peace Pledge, but
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History1 min gelesen
Today In History
JULY 17, 1918 TSAR NICHOLAS II OF RUSSIA AND HIS FAMILY WERE EXECUTED. YEARS LATER, CONSPIRACY THEORIES EMERGED, AND IMPOSTORS BEGAN TO SURFACE. AN EASTERN EUROPEAN WOMAN NAMED ANNA ANDERSON CLAIMED TO BE GRAND DUCHESS ANASTASIA ROMANOV, SPARED DEATH
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History8 min gelesen
Crimes And Consequences
As the summer of 107 bce drew to a close, Gaius Marius drove his legions deeper into the North African interior, determined to accomplish something great. A newly elected consul of the Roman Republic, he had recently taken command of Rome’s war again
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History1 min gelesen
DRAWN & QUARTERED
Illustrator Henri Mayer took aim at the imperialist superpowers of his day in this 1898 cartoon for the French newspaper Le Petit Journal. In it he shows Queen Victoria of Britain, Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, and figures
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History2 min gelesen
‘Little Joe’ Crossbow
On October 27, 1942, the U.S. Office of Strategic Services, the nation’s wartime intelligence agency, asked the National Defense Research Committee to come up with a silent, easily concealed weapon that its covert operatives could carry deep into occ
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History3 min gelesen
Mhq Crossword Notable Quotes
1 Red in the face 7 Partner of balances 13 Anglo-___ Wars (1824–1900) 20 Beverage brought to LBJ by a military valet 21 ___ Hellfighters 22 PT ___ (mariners like JFK) 23 Disclose 24 Designer who served in the Italian army 25 Varmint 26 “Never was so
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History3 min gelesen
Invisible Enemies
The surest sign of impending death was the skin’s ghostly bluish tint, a pall of sickness that soon, even before rigor mortis set in, would turn deep purple and then slate gray. Cyanosis, a condition brought on by inadequate oxygenation of the blood,
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History15 min gelesen
Killer Instinct
Lecturing to a group of young U.S. Army Rangers on a field at Fort Meade, Maryland, in May 1942, U.S. Army lieutenant colonel Francois d’Eliscu ordered a trainee to level his rifle and bayonet and charge at him, full bore. “Come on, boy, like you mea
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History7 min gelesen
The Tragedy Of Guernica
George Steer was born in South Africa in 1909 and went on to study classics at Oxford, but he soon decided to follow in the footsteps of his father, a newspaper editor, and become a journalist. In 1935, after working in London as a reporter for the Y
MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History1 min gelesen
Big Shots
A historian once described him as “a portly cavalryman with a painter’s eye for landscapes, a gourmet’s taste for wines, and a soldier’s eye for ground.” Joseph T. Dickman, a native of Dayton, Ohio, graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Po
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