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20.00Ca.

20.00Ca.

buffetandbeverageswithReception

BuffetundGetränkenmitStehempfang

20.00–18.30

20.00–18.30

(Aarhus)RajaRubinaDr.Prof.

(Aarhus)RajaRubinaDr.Prof.Frau

Bedeutung“situationsbezogener

Bedeutung“situationsbezogener

HerstellungzurMittelalsOstenNahen

HerstellungzurMittelalsOstenNahen

römischenimPriesternvonSelbstdarstellungen

römischenimPriesternvonSelbstdarstellungen

berühmt:warVaterMeinan!mich„Sieh

berühmt:warVaterMeinan!mich„Sieh

LecturePublic

Festvortrag

MusicofSchoolErfurttheofGuitar-Duo

ErfurtMusikschulederGitarren-Duo

Music

ProgrammpunktMusikalischer

RüpkeJörgDr.Prof.

RüpkeJörgDr.Prof.Herr

Projecttheto

ProjektzumEinführungundReligion’”

IntroductionandReligion’”‘Polisand‘Cults’

‘Polisand‘Cults’QuestioningReligion:Ancient

QuestioningReligion:Ancient“LivedProject

“LivedERC-ProjektsdesLeitersdesGrußwort

ERC-theofDirectortheofAddressWelcome

Max-Weber-theofDeantheofAddressWelcome

StudiesSocialandCulturalAdvancedforCenter

SpickermannWolfgangDr.Prof.

fürMax-Weber-KollegsdesDekansdesGrußwort

Studiensozialwissenschaftlicheundkultur-

SpickermannWolfgangDr.Prof.Herr

RösslerPatrickDr.Prof.Herr

RösslerPatrickDr.Prof.

ErfurtUniversität

ResearchersYoungandResearch

derNachwuchswissenschaftlichenund

forPresidentVicetheofAddressWelcome

ForschungfürVizepräsidentendesGrußwort

WalsmannMarion

WalsmannMarionFrau

ThuringiaofChancellery

StaatskanzleiThüringer

StatetheofHeadandAffairsEuropeanfor

derChefinundEuropaangelegenheitenund

MinisterThueringentheofAddressWelcome

Bundes-fürMinisterinThüringerderGrußwort

MusicofSchoolErfurttheofGuitar-Duo

ErfurtMusikschulederGitarren-Duo

Music

ProgrammpunktMusikalischer

18.30–17.00

18.30–17.00

Admission16.30

Einlass16.30Ab

2013uneJ11,ayDuest

2013uniJ,11.ienstagD

Müller-SchimmelVeronica

HuffElias

DuoGuitar|DuoGitarren

ErfurtMusikschule

DarbietungMusikalische

PerformanceMusical

73Regierungsstraße

Erfurt99084

ofChancelleryState|StaatskanzleiThüringer

Thuringia

CeremonyOpening|EröffnungFeierliche

Thuringia CeremonyOpening|EröffnungFeierliche Organizers: Prof. Dr. Jörg Rüpke Prof. Dr. Rubina Raja Dr.
Thuringia CeremonyOpening|EröffnungFeierliche Organizers: Prof. Dr. Jörg Rüpke Prof. Dr. Rubina Raja Dr.

Organizers:

Prof. Dr. Jörg Rüpke Prof. Dr. Rubina Raja Dr. des. Marlis Arnhold Dr. Valentino Gasparini

Contact: marlis.arnhold@uni-erfurt.de

Image: Altar with sacrificed ram, Rome, Vat. Mus. Inv. 531 (Arnhold 2013)

www.uni-erfurt.de/maxwe

UNIVERSITÄT ERFURT Max-Weber-Kolleg für kultur- und sozialwissenschaftliche Studien Nordhäuser Str. 74, 99089 Erfurt Forschungsgebäude 1 (Haus 27) Tel.: +49(0)361/737-2800 Email: ilona.bode@uni-erfurt.de

27) Tel.: +49(0)361/737-2800 Email: ilona.bode@uni-erfurt.de This project is funded by the European Union Sharpening the

This project is funded by the European Union

Sharpening the Knife: Making This project is funded by the European Union Religion Effective in Everyday Life Opening Conference for
Sharpening the Knife: Making

Religion Effective in Everyday Lifeis funded by the European Union Sharpening the Knife: Making Opening Conference for the ERC Research

Opening Conference for the ERC Research Project “Lived Ancient Religion:the Knife: Making Religion Effective in Everyday Life Questioning ‘Cults’ and ‘Polis Religion’” 11 t

Questioning ‘Cults’ and ‘Polis Religion’” 11 t h to 14 t h June 2013 | Thüringer Staatskanzlei and Augustinerkloster, Erfurt
11 Questioning ‘Cults’ and ‘Polis Religion’” t h to 14 t h June 2013 | Thüringer Staatskanzlei th to 14 th June 2013 | Thüringer Staatskanzlei and Augustinerkloster, Erfurt

‘Polis Religion’” 11 t h to 14 t h June 2013 | Thüringer Staatskanzlei and Augustinerkloster,

The conference: Looking at methodology,

sharpening its knife

As the title of the conference indicates, methodology is crucial for research in the history of ancient religions. The concept of “lived religion”, chosen as a starting point, has been developed for the description and analysis of contemporary religion (Meredith McGuire). It does not address how individuals replicate a set of religious practices and beliefs preconfigured by an institutionalised official religion within their biographies – or, conversely, opt out of adhering to tradition. Of course, considering the relationship of individuals to tradition, such an assumption could in principle work in either a religiously pluralistic or a mono-confessional society. Instead, “lived ancient religion” focuses on the actual everyday experience, on practices, expressions, and interactions that could be related to “religion”. Such “religion”is understood as a spectrum of experiences, actions, beliefs and communications hinging on human communication with super-human or even transcendent agent(s), for the ancient Mediterranean usually conceptualised as “gods”. Ritualisation and elaborate forms of representation are called upon for the success of communication with these addressees.

When concentrating on practices, one should accept and account for incoherence rather than coherence (even in research into contemporary religion), the stressed role of mediality and the importance given to knowledge and biographical coherence. Ancient religions are only partially receptive to techniques established in social studies to create new data by means of empirical or experimental procedures. It cannot be hoped that extensive descriptions of rituals stem from people whom we know to have practiced them, or that people whose reflection on religion is preserved in the literary tradition left other evidence of personal practices. The generalisation of the individual instance (hardly ever representative

Program of the Conference at

Augustinerkloster, Erfurt

WeDnesDay, 12th June

I The Role of Objects (Chair: Rubina Raja)

09.00

Lucinda Dirven (Amsterdam): Imagining Religion in Mithraic Cults. The Case of Dura-Europos

09.45

Lara Weiss (Erfurt): Conceptualizing the Creation of the Sacred: Mass Production Vs. Handmade Figurines

10.30

Coffee

11.00

Ulrike Egelhaaf-Gaiser (Göttingen):

Semper odoratis spirabunt floribus arae:

Sacrificed Poems in the Third Book of Statius’ Silvae

11.45

Michael Satlow (Providence, RI): Vows and Curses in Late Roman Palestine

12.45

Lunch

14.00

Guided tour through the medieval city

in a methodologically plausible way) is just as problematic as the reliability of elite descriptions of mass behaviour – this is, of course, the overall situation in the historical critique of sources. By drawing on the model of “lived religion”, scattered evidence could be contextualised and interpreted by relating it to individual agents, their use of space and time, their forming of social coalitions, their negotiation with religious specialists or “providers”, and their attempts to “make sense” of religion in a situational manner and thus render it effective.

This is not a material statement about any logical priority of the individual, but a methodological option, which provides a radical alternative to “cults” and “polis religion” and a way to overcome the latter’s deficits. The “lived religion” approach as proposed by the Erfurt project induces methodological modifications in the process of selecting and interpreting the evidence, as it focuses on experience rather than symbols; embodiment rather than ritual; and culture in interaction rather than habitus, organisation or culture as text.

In order to bring such an approach to bear on the available evidence, research will have to concentrate on individual appraisal and interaction in diverse social spaces: the primary space of the house and familial interaction (including familial funeral space); the secondary space of religious experience and interaction in voluntary or professional associations, the spaces shared by many individuals or groups in the public sites of sanctuaries or festival routes; and finally the virtual space of literary communication and the intellectual discourses formed therein. To analyse the whole continuum of social interaction ranging from domestic cult to public spaces and professionals is of particular importance. The use and construction of these social spaces by individual agents have to be indexed topographically, for

thursDay, 13th June

III Meaning in Situations (Chair: Marlis Arnhold)

09.00

Anton Bierl (Basel): Lived Religion and Construction of Meaning in Greek Literary Texts and Contexts. Genre, Situation, Occasion, Intention

09.45

Eric Rebillard (Ithaca, NY): Everyday Christianity in Third-Century Carthage

10.30

Coffee

11.00

Vered Noam (Tel Aviv): Ritual Impurity and Human Intention

11.45

Christopher Smith (Rome):„Aus altrömischen Priesterbüchern“

12.45

Lunch

14.00

Poster session

IV Appropriation (Chair: Jörg Rüpke)

II Group Styles (Chair: Richard Gordon)

15.00

Karen King (Harvard): “Religion(s) of the Book”/“Textual Communities”.

16.00

Markus Vinzent (London): Practical and Cognitive Dissonance: Jewish Liturgical Traditions, Innovations and Counter-rites

15.45

Michal Bar-Asher Siegal (Beer Sheva): The Transmission and Collections of Traditions in Anthologies

in Marcion’s Roman Community

16.30

Coffee

16.45

Coffee

 

17.00

Zsuzsa Varhelyi (Boston): Just Like the

Angela Standhartinger (Marburg): The

17.15

Marlis Arnhold (Erfurt): The Last One Shuts the Door: Cult-Groups Communicating Through (In)Visibility

17.45

Emperor and his Family: Appropriating the Emperors’ Religion in the Roman Empire

18.00

John North (London): Funeral Rituals and the Significance of the Nenia

Beginning of the Eucharist or Constructing the Lord’s Supper

19.15

Dinner at Augustinerkloster

19.00

Dinner at Augustinerkloster

instance, by domestic or commercial, urban, and extra-urban, open or architecturally defined sites. This form of indexing enables the contextualisation of religion in everyday life. A further dimension has to be considered: When were these spaces used in terms of calendar dates or frequency? Clearly, the permanent use of an amulet differs from a one-time ritual (that might, however, be remembered time and again). Religious traditions form part of such an environment; therefore they should not be studied as if they were an independent variable, but rather as a product of providers of religious knowledge and services, “priests” or professionals. Most of the evidence at our disposal is best to be interpreted neither as “authentic” individual expression nor as institutional “survival”, but as media, as the results of a culture created in interaction.

The scope of this conference is to bring together scholars working in different fields and types of sources to propose and discuss methodological approaches that have proven or might prove helpful for elucidating the dimensions of “lived ancient religions”. Short contributions of about 20 minutes – leaving enough time of discussion for each contribution and for cross-reference starting from different types of evidence (but concentrating on methodology within the oral presentation) should create a panorama of innovative approaches and inspire further elaboration and new ideas. For the time being we suggest grouping contributions and discussions into five groups, each bringing together expertise of various disciplines.

FriDay, 14th June

V Learning and Memory (Chair: Harry Maier)

09.00

Jörg Rüpke (Erfurt): The Implicit Reader of Antiquarian Literature: Questions in Ovid’s Libri fastorum

09.45

Katharina Waldner (Erfurt): Reading, Knowledge and Religious Practice: The Derveni Papyrus and its Context

10.30

Coffee

11.00

Final discussion (Chair: Jörg Rüpke, Rubina Raja)

12.30

Lunch

Departure

Venue:

Evangelisches Augustinerkloster zu Erfurt Augustinerstraße 10 99084 Erfurt