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Herakles bekämpft die Harpyien, 1500. Dürer 1471-1528.

Neue
Pinakotek, München
Kopf des Herakles. Kopie
nach einer Statue des 2.
Jahrhunderts v. Chr.
Glyptothek, München
Herakles. Ostgiebel des
Tempels von Ägina.
Glyptothek, München
Kopf des Herakles.
Kopie nach einem
griechischen Vorbild,
wohl von Lysipp um 370
v. Chr. Glyptothek,
München.
0314: Omphale. Statue from 200 BC.
Archaeologie Staatssamlung
Heracles. Roman marble copy of
Greek original from 340 BC.
Archaeologie Staatssamlung
Hercules Farnese. Marble
copy of Greek original, 320
BC. Archaeologie
Staatssamlung
0725: Heracles and
Antaeus.Österreich
ische Galerie
Belvedere, Wien
0832: Hercules & Omphale,
1770-80. Painting by Gaetano
Gandolfi 1734-1802.
Staatsgalerie, Stuttgart
Hercules and the
Nemean lion,
1580. Paul von
Praun's art
workshop 1548-
1616.
Germanisches
Nationalmuseum,
Nürnberg.
1020: Heracles. Work
from Florence, 16C.
Städtische Galerie-
Liebighaus, Museum
alter Plastik, Frankfurt.
Shield of
Heracles, 1832-42.
Work in bronze by
Ludwig von
Schwanthaler
1802-1848.
Städtische Galerie-
Liebighaus,
Museum alter
Plastik, Frankfurt.
Herkules and Antaeus, 1531. Painting by
Hans Baldung 1484/85-1545. Hessisches
Landesmuseum, Kassel.
Hercules and the Hydra, 1918-19. Statue by Rudolph Tegner, 1873-1950
Rudolph Tegners Museum
Heracles and the wild
boar (fire-gilt bronze),
1918-19. Statue by
Rudolph Tegner, 1873-
1950. Rudolph Tegners
Museum
Heracles
dancing with
Omphale, 1927.
Statue by
Rudolph
Tegner, 1873-
1950. Rudolph
Tegners
Museum
2312: Hercules and Achelous 1590. Cornelis Cornelisz, called Cornelis
van Haarlem 1562-1638. Gemälde Galerie Kulturforum, Berlin.
3408: Herakles, Antaios und Nereus.
Terracotta. Frankreich 1730-50.
Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe,
Hamburg.
3805: Christian Griepenkerl (1839-1916): Befreiung durch Herakles.
Griepenkerl-Gemälde im Treppenhaus des Augusteums. Augusteum,
Oldenburg.
Noël Hallé 1711-1781: Hercule et Omphale
1759. Palais des Beaux-arts, Lille
Sebastiano Ricci 1659-1734: Hercule filant aux pieds d'Omphale, vers
1701. Musée de Picardie, Amiens
Peter Paul Rubens
1577-1640: Der
trunkene Herkules von
einer Nymphe und
einem Satyrn geführt.
Gemäldegalerie Alte
Meister, Dresden.
Hercules. Frederiksborgmuseet (Det
Nationalhistoriske Museum på
Frederiksborg Slot), Copenhagen
Jens Adolph Jerichaü 1816-1883:
Hercules and Hebe, 1845. Ny
Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen
Hercules. Roman statue.
Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek,
Copenhagen.
Hercules, 1C AD. Ny
Carlsberg Glyptotek,
Copenhagen
Herakles fra Sabinerne.
Latium 2 - 1 aarh. f. Kr. Ny
Carlsberg Glyptotek,
Copenhagen
Gustave
Moreau
1826-1898:
Diomède
dévoré par
ses chevaux,
1865. Musée
des beaux
arts, Rouen.
Gaspare
Diziani
1689-
1767:
Hercule
aux pieds
d'Ompha
le, vers
1756-
1760.
Musée
d'Art et
d'Histoir
e,
Genève.
Hercules. Graeco-Roman marble
statuette in the Townley collection.
Hyalograph drawn by F. Walens.
Gaspare Diziani 1689-1767: L'Enlèvement de Déjanire, vers 1750-60.
Musée d'Art et d'Histoire, Genève.
Herm in the form of Heracles
from Thespies, 1st C BC.
Archaeological Museum,
Thebes
Red-figured vase from the
polyandrion of Thespiai, 424 BC.
Archaeological Museum, Thebes
Small vase for perfumed oils in the
shape of Herakles' head from a
particular production of Attic
workshops at the end of the 6C BC.
National Archaeological Museum,
Athens.
Relief. Herakles resting under a
plane-tree. 2C AD. From Athens.
Copy of a 3C BC original.
National Archaeological
Museum, Athens
Rödfigurigt
blandkärl, krater
med Herakles.
Syditalien 400-
talet f.kr.
Medelhavsmuse
et, Stockholm
Hercules finds his son
Telephus in Arcadia.
Ercolano, Basilica.
National Archaeological
Museum, Naples.
Dish with
Hercules and
Antaeus, about
1540. Tin-
glazed and
enamelled
earthenware.
Victoria and
Albert
Museum,
London.
Plate showing
wrestling with
Achelous about
1540-45. Tin-
glazed and
enamelled
earthenware.
Victoria and
Albert
Museum,
London.
Pier Jacopo
Alaribonacolsi
called Antico
Bonacolsi,
about 1460-
1528: The
infant
Hercules and
the serpents.
Bronze.
Victoria and
Albert
Museum,
London.
Lucas Faydherbe 1617-
1697: Hercules. Victoria and
Albert Museum, London
Ludovico Carracci: 1555-
1619: Hercules and the
Hydra. Victoria and
Albert Museum, London
Hercules. Marble. Made in
the 2nd century AD. British
Museum, London
Young Heracles. Roman copy of a
work of the 4th century BC.
British Museum, London
Colossal statue). Hercules.
Pentelic marble. About AD
120-150. British Museum,
London
Kopf einer Statue des
Herakles. Kranz aus
Blättern der Pappel.
Freie Kopie nach
griechischem Vorbild
(330/320 v. Chr.) 1. Jh.
n. Chr. Glyptotek,
München.
Heracles, c. 470 BC.
Archaeological Museum,
Olympia
Herakles 'Lansdowne'. Fra Hadrians
villa i Tivoli Skopas, Graesk, midt 4
årh f. Kr. (Romkopi) Malibu, J. P.
Getty Museum (Royal Cast
Collection, Copenhagen).
Fra statuen 'Herakles Farnese'.
Lysippos. Graesk hellenistisk sen
4. årh. f.Kr. Romersk kopi.
Napoli, Museo Archeologico
(Royal Cast Collection,
Copenhagen).
The Life and Times of Hercules
Stories about the gods, called myths, were made up thousands of years ago. Was there a real
Hercules, a man behind the stories? We will never know. Yet, his story is of a man who was so
strong and courageous, whose deeds were so mighty, and who so endured all the hardships that
were given to him, that when he died, Hercules was brought up to Mount Olympus to live with
the gods.
Hercules was both the most famous hero of ancient times and the most beloved. More stories
were told about him than any other hero. Hercules was worshipped in many temples all over
Greece and Rome.
Berlin F 2278, Attic
red figure kylix, c. 500
B.C.
Side B: Hercules,
carrying his club and
wearing his lion skin,
walks with a
procession of gods and
goddesses to Olympus.
Photograph by Maria
Daniels, courtesy of the
Staatliche
Museen zu Berlin,
Preußischer
Kulturbesitz:
Antikensammlung
Louvre G 192, Attic red figure stamnos, c. 480-470
B.C.
The baby Hercules wrestles with the snakes Hera has
sent to his crib.
Photograph by Maria Daniels, courtesy of the Musée
du Louvre
Toledo 1952.66, Attic black
figure lekythos, c. 510 B.C.
Hercules sneaks up on a
sleeping giant, Alkyoneus
Hercules on the Pyre
Hercules got married a second time, to the beautiful Deianira. When
Hercules was returning from his last adventure, Deianira gave him a
welcome-home present. This was a cloak which she had woven herself.
Deianira had a magic balm which a centaur had given to her. The centaur
told Deianira that anyone who put on the balm would love her forever.
But actually the balm contained a caustic poison.

London E 370, Attic red figure pelike,


c. 440-430 B.C.
Hercules trades in his old lionskin for
the new cloak Deianira has woven
him.
Photograph courtesy of the Trustees of
the British Museum, London
When Hercules received the cloak and
tried it on, his body immediately began to
burn with excruciating pain. He tried to
pull the cloak off, but the pain burned even
harder and deeper. Death, thought
Hercules, would be better than
unendurable pain. Bellowing in agony, he
asked his friends to build a huge pile of
wood on the top of Mount Oeta. This
would be Hercules' funeral pyre. He laid
himself upon the pyre, and told his friends
to light it. As the fire began to burn
Hercules alive, the great gods looked
down from Olympus. Zeus said to Hera
that Hercules had suffered enough. Hera
agreed and ended her anger. Zeus sent
Athena to take Hercules from the pyre,
and she brought Hercules to Olympus on
her chariot.
Munich 2360, Attic red figure pelike, c.
410 B.C.
Athena and Hercules leave the funeral
pyre, headed for Mount Olympus