Sie sind auf Seite 1von 16

The Period

Two Phrases Become One Structure

Definition
A period consists of two phrases, joined together in a coherent
succession. The two phrases are called the antecedent and the
consequent.
Period - Basic Components

!!
%
%
# $$ $ !" % !
$

antecedent

# $$ $ !" (
$

%% %% !!
% %!
&

% % % %
% % % % %% %%
&

%%%%%

%% !!
%!

consequent

%% %% !!
% %!
&

% % % %
% % % % %% %%%
&

Beethoven

%% '
%
&

)'
%%%%%%%
(
(
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
% %
% %
% %%
% %
% % %%% %
%
%
%
%
%
% % % % %
% %% %
% % % % %
%% %% %
%
%
V

Antecedent: Ending with Half-Cadence

Brahms

!!
%
%
# $$ $ !" % !
$
# $$ $ !" (
$

%% %% !!
% %!
&

% % % %
% % % % %% %%
&

%%%%%

%% !!
%!

%% %% !!
% %!
&

% % % %
% % % % %% %%%
&

%% '
%
&

)'
%%%%%%%
(
(
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
% %
% %
% %%
% %
% % %%% %
%
%
%
%
%
% % % % %
% %% %
% % % % %
%% %% %
%
%
V

The Antecedent

The antecedent usually ends in a half cadence of some sort.


Antecedent: Ending with Half-Cadence

+*

% ,

% % ,

%%% % ,
%
%
%
V

% % ,

% % ,

%%% % ,
%
%
%
V

Brahms

Antecedent: Ending with Rhythmically Weak Authentic Cadence

%! % % % %! % % % %
+ $ ".

% % %

%
%
%% % % %%%% % % %
%
%
IAC

% % %

% -Mozart
PAC

Antecedent: Ending with Half-Cadence Followed by Modulation

Mendelssohn
%
% % % %! %
!
%
%
/
%
%
$
%
%
%
+ " % % % /%
%
% % % % % % %% %% % %% /% $0%% % %% /% %% 0%% %% %% %% ! % % %%
%

%%

% % %

%%

% % %

The Antecedent
Antecedent: Ending with Half-Cadence

+*

%% % ,
%
%
%
%
%
,
%
%
,
%
%
%
,
%
%
Sometimes
the
cadence
can
be
authentic,
if
it
is
rhythmically
%
%
, %
, %
%
%
V

weak:

Brahms

Antecedent: Ending with Rhythmically Weak Authentic Cadence

%! % % % %! % % % %
.
$
+ "

% % %

%
%
%% % % %%%% % % %
%
%
IAC

% % %

% -Mozart
PAC

Antecedent: Ending with Half-Cadence Followed by Modulation

+ $ !" %% % %% /% %%
%
% % 0%
%
# $ !" %
%

% % % % %! %
%
/
%
% %
% % % % % % %% %% % %% /% $0%% %
% %
%
%
%
/
%
% $%
%
% % % %% % / %% %% 0 % 0%%
%
V

%% /% % 0%% %% %% %% ! % %%
%
% %
%% % % % %
%%
% % % 0%
%

Mendelssohn

F: I

Antecedent: Ending with Half-Cadence

+*

% ,

% % ,

%%% % ,
%
%
%
V

% % , % % ,
The Antecedent

%%% % ,
%
%
%
V

Brahms

Antecedent: Ending with Rhythmically Weak Authentic Cadence

An
antecedent
may
end
with
either
a
half
or
an
authentic
!
%
% % % % %! % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % %
Mozart
%
%
.
cadence
if
the
consequent
modulates.
Here
the
antecedent
ends
$
+ "
IAC
in a half cadence:
PAC

Antecedent: Ending with Half-Cadence Followed by Modulation

% % % % %! %
!
%
%
/
%
%
$
% %
+ " %% % %% /%
% % % % % % %% %% % %% /% $0%% %
% % %
% % % / % % 0 % 0%
% % 0%
%
%
/
%
% $%
%
%
%
%
%
%
# $ !" %
%
%
%
%
%
V

%% /% % 0%% %% %% %% ! % %%
%
% %
%% % % % %
%%
% % % 0%
%

Mendelssohn

F: I

Antecedent: Authentic Cadence Followed by Modulating Consequent

/! ! % % '
+ " %% ! % %&
# / ! %! % %& '

% ' % '
%
%
&
&
%
%
& ' & '

)
% ' %%) '
%
% ' % '
&

)
%% ' %) '
%
%%
'
% '

%% !! %% %% '
&
%! % %& '

% ' % ' %% '


%
%
&
&
&
%
/%
%
& ' & ' & '

Schumann

%%
%% ' % '
/
'
&
&
&
%
) ' ) '
& '

% % % % %! % % % %
+ $ ".

% % % %% % % %%%% % % %

% % %

% % %

IAC

% -Mozart
PAC

The Antecedent

Antecedent: Ending with Half-Cadence Followed by Modulation

Mendelssohn
%
% % % %! %
!
%
%
/
%
%
$
% %
+ " %% % %% /%
% % % % % % %% %% % %% /% $0%% % %% /% %% 0%% %% %% %% ! % % %%
%
% % %
% % % /consequent
%
%
%
% 0 % 0%
%
/
%
%
%is$%strong
% enough
The
resolution
of
a
modulating
so
0
%
%
% %
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
# $ !" %
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
0
%
%
%
that the ear hears a period structure even if the antecedent ends %
V

on an authentic cadence:

F: I

Antecedent: Authentic Cadence Followed by Modulating Consequent

/! ! % % '
+ " %% ! % %&
# / !" %! % %& '

% ' % '
%
%
&
&
%
%
& ' & '

)
)
% ' %% '
%
% ' % '
&
&

)
%% ' %) '
%
%%
% ' & '
&

G: V7

%% !! %% %% '
&
%! % %& '

% ' % ' %% '


%
%
&
&
&
%
/%
%
& ' & ' & '

Schumann

%%
%% ' % '
/
'
&
&
&
%
) ' ) '
& '
+ %
%%
%
D: V7

The Antecedent
There are even situations in which both antecedent and
consequent end on half cadencessuch as if the period is Part
II (the middle section) of a three-part song form:
Period as Part II of a Three-Part Song Form: Both Antecedent and Consequent on V

! % % % % % %! % % % % % % % % % %
&
$! &
%
%
$
%
# "% %%
'
'
(%% !! % % )
Part I (Two Phrases [a b])

Part II

Tchaikovsky

&
!
%
%
%! %
% % % % %'
antecedent

$ %! % % % % % % % % %! & % % % %! % % % % % %! % % % % % % % % % % %! &
$
#
% (% ! % %
'
'
'
(% ! % % *
Part III = Part I

consequent

Contrasting Period: Four Consequents to Schubert's

%! % %

Consequent by identity (Schubert's Original)

$ $+ %
$
# $

Wiegenlied

% % % % % % %

%! % %

% % % % % % %

The Consequent
As a rule the consequent ends in an authentic cadence, either in
the original key or in a new key (in the case of a modulating
period.)
In addition to the previous exception (when the period is Part II
of a three-part song form) a consequent will end on a half
cadence if it is part of the first half of a double period (a form
which we'll cover later.)

Types of Periods
Parallel Period
Both antecedent and consequent are similar in some way,
at least at the beginning of the phrase. (Rhythmic
similarity is not necessarily a determinant.)

Contrasting Period
The antecedent and consequent are different from each
other. (Rhythmic similarity is not necessarily a
determinant.)

"Mirror" Period
A kind of contrasting period in which the consequent
moves in the opposite direction from the antecedent.

Period as Part II of a Three-Part Song Form: Both Antecedent and Consequent on V

! % % % % % %! % % % % % % % % % %
&
$! &
%
%
$
%
%
%
!
# "% %
'
'
(% ! % % )
Part I (Two Phrases [a b])

Part II

Tchaikovsky

&
!
%
%
%
%
%! %
% %%
'

Types of Parallel Periods

antecedent

$ %! % % % % % % % % %! & % % % %! % % % % % %! % % % % % % % % % % %! &
$
#
% (% ! % %
'
'
'
(% ! % % *
Part III = Part I

Parallel period byVidentity:

consequent

At least the first measures of the phrases are identical


Contrasting Period: Four Consequents to Schubert's

%! % %

Consequent by identity (Schubert's Original)

$ $+ %
$
# $

%! % %

Wiegenlied

% % % % % % %

Consequent by transposition (this would work well in a double period)

$$$ %
$
#

% % % % % % %

%! % %

% % % % % % %

%! % %

% % % % % % %

$$$ % % % ! % %
$
#

% % %%%%%
%

%%%%%%%%% % %% %%%%%% %% %
'

$ $ % % %! % %
$
# $

% % %%%%%
%

%
%%%%%
%
%
%
%%%% )
%! % % % % ! %

Consequent by embellishment

Consequent by contour similarity

! % % % % % %! % % % % % % % % % %
&
$! &
%
%
$
%
%
%
!
# "% %
'
'
(% ! % % )
Part I (Two Phrases [a b])

Part II

&
!
%
%
%! %
% % % % %'

Types of Parallel
Periods
%! % % % %! % % % % % %

$ %! % % % % % % % % %! & % % %
$
#
% (% ! % %
'

Part III = Part I

consequent

%
'

%
'

Tchaikovsky

antecedent

% % (%% !! %& % *

Parallel period by transposition:


The consequent is a transposed (or pitch-shifted) version of
Consequent by identity (Schubert's Original)
the antecedent.

Contrasting Period: Four Consequents to Schubert's

$ $+ %
$
# $

%! % %

%! % %

Wiegenlied

% % % % % % %

Consequent by transposition (this would work well in a double period)

$$$ %
$
#

% % % % % % %

%! % %

% % % % % % %

%! % %

% % % % % % %

$$$ % % % ! % %
$
#

% % %%%%%
%

%%%%%%%%% % %% %%%%%% %% %
'

$ $ % % %! % %
$
# $

% % %%%%%
%

% %%%%%
%
%
%
%%%% )
%! % % % % ! %

Consequent by embellishment

Consequent by contour similarity

Unambiguous Contrasting Period

antecedent

$ %! % % % % % % % % %! & % % % %! % % % % % %! % % % % % % % % % % %! &
$
#
% (% ! % %
'
'
'
(% ! % % *
Part III = Part I

consequent

Types of Parallel Periods

Contrasting Period: Four Consequents to Schubert's

Wiegenlied

% %period
$ $ +Parallel
! % % by
%
% embellishment:
% % % % % %
$
# $
%
Consequent by identity (Schubert's Original)

%! % %

% % % % % % %

%! % %

% % % % % % %

The consequent is an embellished version of the antecedent.


%! % %

Consequent by transposition (this would work well in a double period)

$$$ %
$
#

% % % % % % %

$$$ % % % ! % %
$
#

% % %%%%%
%

%%%%%%%%% % %% %%%%%% %% %
'

$ $ % % %! % %
$
# $

% % %%%%%
%

%
%%%%%
%
%
%
%%%% )
%! % % % % ! %

Consequent by embellishment

Consequent by contour similarity

Unambiguous Contrasting Period

$ , %% %% %%
$
# "

%% !!

%% %%
'

%% %% !!

%% -'

%%

%% %% %%

! %! % %
%
%!
%% %%
%! % %

Kuhlau

--

consequent

Contrasting Period: Four Consequents to Schubert's

%! %

Types
of
Parallel
Periods
%
%
%

Consequent by identity (Schubert's Original)

$ $+ %
$
# $

Wiegenlied

% % % % % % %

%
$
%
$
%
%
!
%
%
%
%
Parallel
period
by
contour
similarity:
%
% % % % %
#$ $
%
Consequent by transposition (this would work well in a double period)

%! %

% % % % % % %

%! % %

% % % % % % %

The consequent moves in similar motions to the antecedent.

$$$ % % % ! % %
$
#

% % %%%%%
%

%%%%%%%%% % %% %%%%%% %% %
'

$ $ % % %! % %
$
# $

% % %%%%%
%

%
%%%%%
%
%
%
%%%% )
%! % % % % ! %

Consequent by embellishment

Consequent by contour similarity

Unambiguous Contrasting Period

$ , %% %% %%
$
# "

%% !!

%% %%
'

%% %% !!

Contrasting Period with Rhythmic Similarity

$$

&

&

%% -'

%%

%% %% %%
%% !!

&

! %! % %
%
%!
%% %%
%! % %
%%% %

&

Kuhlau

--

Johann Jakob de Neufville

&

%! % %

# $ $$ + %

% % % % % % %

%! % %

Consequent by transposition (this would work well in a double period)

$$$ %
$
#

$$$ % % % ! % %
$
#
Consequent by embellishment

% % % % % % %

%! % %

% % % % % % %

%! % %

% % % % % % %

Contrasting Periods

% % %%%%%
%

%%%%%%%%% % %% %%%%%% %% %
'

Rhythm
is
not
an
issue
in
determining
contrasting
periods,
but
if
$ $ % % %! % % % % %
% %%%%%
%
$
%
$
%
%
%
%
# the two phrases are markedly
%
%! % % %yet
%%% )
% different
% ! %still dependent %upon
each other for making an entire statement, it is a contrasting
period.
Consequent by contour similarity

Unambiguous Contrasting Period

$ , %% %% %%
$
# "

%% !!

%% %%
'

%% %% !!

%% -'

Contrasting Period with Rhythmic Similarity

$
$
#

&
% %

%!

%!

&
% %

%!

-!

%%%

% % % (- !

%%

%% %% %%
%% !!!
%% !

&
% %

! %! % %
%
%!
%% %%
%! % %
% % % % %& %

Kuhlau

--

Johann Jakob de Neufville

%!

&
% (%

-!

Ambiguous Contrasting Period -- or Parallel by Contour Similarity?

!!

% !!

% % % % (% % %

Mozart

%! %

#$ $ %

$ $ % % %! % %
$
# $
Consequent by contour similarity

% % %%%%%
%

%%%

%% % %%
'

%%

% % %%%%%
%

%
%%%%%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%%%% )
%!
% %!

%% %

Contrasting Periods

Unambiguous Contrasting Period

The
rhythm
of
the
consequent
may
be
similar
or
even
identical:
!
% % % %
%

$, % % %
$
# "

%!

%% %%
'

%% %% !!

%% -'

%%

Contrasting Period with Rhythmic Similarity

$
$
#

%!

&
% %

%!

&
% %
!
%
.

%!

%% %% %%

%% !!!
%% !

% % % (- !

&
% %

! %! %
%
%!
%! % %
% % % % %& %

%% %%

Kuhlau

--

Johann Jakob de Neufville

%!

&
% (%

-!

Ambiguous Contrasting Period -- or Parallel by Contour Similarity?

% !!
$
#$ +

%
.

% !!

% % % % (% %

0% %

% % % % (% % %

Mozart

Unambiguous Contrasting Period

$ , %% %% %%
$
# "

%% !!

%% %%
'

%% %% !!

% % %! %

%! %

Ambiguity

%% -'

%%

%% %% %%

%%%

! %! % %
%
%!
%
%
%% %%
%!

Kuhlau

--

It's not always clear whether a period is contrasting or not. Is


Contrasting Period with Rhythmic Similarity
this a parallel period with contour similarity or a contrasting
Johann Jakob de Neufville
%
%
$ period?
&
&
&
!
The
overall
melodic
motion
is
the
same,
and
the
%
%
&
&
%
!
%
$
%
% % (- !
# %! % % %! % % % !
% % %! % (% - !
%% !! % %
consequent is sequential but rhythmically different.
!
%
.

Ambiguous Contrasting Period -- or Parallel by Contour Similarity?

% !!
$
#$ +

%
.

% !!

% % % % (% %

0% %

% % % % (% % %

Mozart