Sie sind auf Seite 1von 492

the watermark

Contributions to Tibetan Studies


Edited by David P. Jackson and Franz-Karl Ehrhard
Volume 7
WIESBADEN 2009
DR. LUDWIG REICHERT VERLAG
Redmda' ba
Buddhist Yogi-Scholar of the Fourteenth Century
The Forgotten Reviver of Madhyamaka Philosophy in Tibet
by
Carola Roloff
WIESBADEN 2009
DR. LUDWIG REICHERT VERLAG
Roloff
Redmda' ba
Gedruckt mit Unterstutzung des Tibetischen Zentrums e.v., Hamburg
Bibliografische Information der Deutschen N ationalbibliothek
Die Deutsche N ationalbibliothek verzeichnet diese Publikation in der Deutschen
Nationalbibliografie; detaillierte bibliografische Daten sind im Internet tiber
http://dnb.ddb.deabrufbar.
Gedruckt auf saurefreiem Papier
(alterungsbestandig - pH7, neutral)
2009 Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden
www.reichert-verlag.de
ISBN: 978-3-89500-693-7
Das Werk einschlieGlich aller seiner Teile ist urheberrechtlich geschutzt.
Jede Verwertung auBerhalb der engen Grenzen des Urheberrechtsgesetzes
ist ohne Zustimmung des Verlages unzulassig und strafuar. Das gilt insbe-
sondere fur Vervielfaltigungen, Dbersetzungen, Mikroverfilmungen und
die Einspeichemng und Verarbeitung in elektronischen Systemen.
Printed in Germany
In memory of
my teacher
Ven. Geshe Thubten Ngawang (1932-2003)
and my mother
Gerda Roloff (1934-2004)
Homage to Chos rje gZhon blo ba by rJe Tsong kha pa




Lord of stainless wisdom, MafijusrI,
Huge treasure of great objectless compassion, Avalokitesvara,
Crown ornament among scholars of the land of snow, Redmda' ba,
gZhon nu blo gros, I pay homage to you.
Contents
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
LIST OF TABLES
INTRODUCTION
purpose of the Study
Overview
Limiting of the Topic and Methodology
Modelling of Red mda' ba's Biography on the Biography of the Buddha
STATE OF RESEARCH
Red mda' ba's Impact on the History of Tibetan Buddhism
A Main Teacher of Tsong kha pa
His Role in the History ofMadhyamaka as the True Reviver ofthe Prasangika-Madhyamaka
Tradition
An Influential Early Opponent of the Jo nang Tradition and the Kalacakratantra
His Role within the Synthesis of the rNgog pa and Sa skya pa Scholastic Lineages
Red mda' ba's Tshad rna Studies in Sa skya
Red mda' ba's Phar phyin Studies
The Scholastic System of Teaching and Learning
HISTORICAL SOURCES ON RED MDA' BA'S LIFE
Biographies of Red mda' ba
Primary Sources
Secondary Sources
Modem Tibetan Secondary Literature
INTRODUCTION TO THE TEXT EDITION OF THE BIOGRAPHY BY SANGS RGYAS RTSE MO
The Two Primary Textual Witnesses
Manuscript A
Manuscript B
Secondary Textual Witnesses
The Minor Works of Red mda' ba
Ye shes rgyal mtshan
Zhalgdams
Aim of Editing
Methodology of Editing
Relationship Between the Two Surviving Primary Witnesses
Details of Editing
Peculiarities of Manuscripts A and B
Abbreviations in the Edition and Apparatus
Transliteration System
Lists of Abbreviations used in the Cursive Manuscripts
Shorthands for Monosyllabic Words (mgyogs bris)
Contractions (bsdu yig)
Elided Spelling (skung yig)
XI
XII
XII
I
2
7
8
9
13
14
15
16
25
28
29
32
33
37
37
37
39
42
43
43
44
45
46
46
47
48
48
49
50
53
55
55
56
57
57
58
60
TEXT EDITION
ENGLISH 'TRANSLATION
THE WRITINGS OF RED MDA' BA
The Minor Works of Red mda' ba
TABULAR CURRICULUM VITAE OF RED MDA' BA
CONCLUSIONS
ApPENDICES
Appendix A: Red mda' ba's Autobiography
Appendix B: Letter to the [Great] Teacher [Buddha Siikyamum]
ABBREVIATIONS
NOTES
BIBLIOGRAPHY
INDEX
67
197
267
272
289
297
303
303
307
315
319
435
457
Acknowledgements
This thesis is the result of a PhD research project carried out at the Department offudian and
Tibetan Studies of the Asia and Africa Institute at the University of Hamburg and in cooperation
with the Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies SamatbNaranasi. Both parties supported
me excellently in the course of the thesis: Above all, my sincere thanks go to Prof. Dr. David P.
Jackson for his support while supervising this thesis. His valuable remarks also significantly
contributed to this dissertation. It was Jackson who first introduced me as MA student in the
- iD.teresting period of Tibetan scholastiCism, where Red mda' ba and Tsong kha pa are the most
outstanding figures.
I would also like to thank the scholars and staff of the Central Institute of Higher Tibetan
. Studies for their support during my stays as researcher for altogether ten months in 2006 and
2007. My thanks go to the director, Prof. Geshe Ngawang Samten, and especially to Dr. Tashi
Tsering, Acarya Lobsang Norbu Siistri, Acarya JampaDhadak, TenzinLungtok Sastri, all of
_ whom made my stay more pleasant and fruitful. I also do not want to miss the opportunity to
thank the owners of the Agrawal Paying Guest House for taking so nicely care of me during
'both stays.
- Additionally, many thanks go to Prof. Dr. Michael Zimmermann, Prof Dr. Eva Neumaier, Prof
"Dr. Lambert Schmithausen, Prof. Dr. Harunaga Isaacson, PD Dr. Felix Erb, Dr. Dorji
--,\Yangchlik; Ven. Damcho Dianna Finnegan, Dr. Gene Smith, Prof. Dr. Franz-Karl Ehrhard, PD
. Dr. Karl-Heinz Everding, Prof Dr. Jens-Uwe Hartmann, PD Dr. AdelheidHermann-Pfandt, PD
Dr. Ulrike Roesler, Prof. Dr. Jan-Ulrich Sobisch, Prof Dr. JosefKeuffer (pedagogy), and Sera
Jhe Abbot Ven. Acarya Geshe Lobsang Palden, Geshe Sonam Rinchen, teacher at the Library
of Tibetan Works & Archives in Dharamsala as well as many other colleagues, especially
Alexander Schiller, Volker Caumans and Kazuo Kano for their support at various stages of the
project. I would also like to thank the Tara Foundation, Tibetan Centre Hamburg, especially
Beate Ludwig, Thorsten Grigat and Prof. Dr. Marlis Diirkop, as well as the Foundation for
Buddhist Studies for their timely financial support
Last but not least, I wish to thank my family and friends for their patience and understanding for
my being less available to them. My special thanks go to Irmtraut Wager, my sister Monika
Schiirzeberg and her family, Gabriele Kiistermann, Moni Kellermann, Dr. Thea Mohr, Dr.
Annette Kleinbrod, Christof Spitz, Dr. med. Wolfuanl Starke, Dr. med. Eva Kuczewski, and
Gabriela Reichert, not only for their inunense encouragement and moral support, but also for
practical help such as in getting texts from Nepal and Tibet, and technical support.
List of Illustrations
Number Page
1. Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros. Source: Red mda' ba's Minor Works. vii
2. Map of Tibet supplement
List of Tables
Number Page
1. Concordance: The Collected Works of Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros 270
2. Tabular Curriculum Vitae of Red mda' ba gZhon nu blogros 289
3. EX8I11pJes of Red mda' ba 'i m8I11 thar ngo mtshar nnad byung, Manuscripts A and B 479
Introduction
Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros (1348-1412Y is a crucial figure in the history of Tibetan Bud-
dhist scholasticism
2
. But in contrast to Tsong kha pa Blo bzang grags pa (1357-1419), whose
main teacher he was, Red mda' ba remains an obscure figure in Western scholarship to date. No
m9nograph has been devoted to him, and until very recently only one of his works was
translated into a Western language, namely Nag8rjuna ~ "Letter to a Friend" with a commentary
by the Venerable Rendawa, Zh6n-nu Lo-dr&. In 1997 Jfugen Sti:iter-Tillmann and Aciirya Tashi
Tsering began translating Red mda' ba' s three most important Madhyamaka commentaries into
English, and all three of them have now been published. For a long time they were regarded as
the earliest indigenous Tibetan Madhyamaka commentaries to have been composed or
available.
4
These are: 1. Rendawa Sh6nnu Lodr6's "Commentary on the 'Entry info the
Middle. ' Lamp which Elucidates ReaJiry-"(Cll:ITS 1997), 2. Rendawa Shonnu Lodro's Com-
mentary on Aryadeva ~ "Four Hundred Vemes "(Manjushri Publications 2004), and 3. Light of
Logic. Commentary on the 'Root of the Middle Way' by Rendawa Sh6nuLodr6. Translation of
the "Dbu ma rtsa bai 'grel pa 'thad pai snang ba "(IDA 2007). The first also provides the most
precise summary of Red mda' ba's biography thus far, drawing from the work of Khetsun
Sangpo (1979), who based his summary on Ye shes rgyal mtshan' s Lam rim bla ma brgyud pa 'i
mam thar, and the latter in turn partly on Las chen Kun dga rgyal mtshan's bKa'gdams chos
'byung gsaJ ba 'i sgron me. Sato (1983: 246) wrote that according to Ye shes rgyal mtshan, Red
mda' ba composed eighteen works. Of these eighteen, only three were known to Sato to have
been published, that is, Red mda'. ba's commentaries on Nagiirjuna's Suhrllekha, Aryadeva's
Catul;1sataka, and CandrakIrti's Madhyamakavatiira. At the same time he noted that Red mda'
ba's important Prasannapada synopsis
5
had not been published yet.
In previous traditional Tibetan scholarship, Red mda' ba's contributions seem to have not
.been much appreciated either, though he is said to have been responsible for the revival of the
Prllsangika Madhyamika tenet system, which was being largely neglected during his time but
which is now the leading philosophical view of Tibetan Buddhism. As this study will show, Red
mda' ba made great contributions to intensify the pure practice of view and conduct.
6
Although
he is referred to as the "great Red mda' ba" and considered to be one of the most prominent
scholars of Tibet, strangely enough there seem to be no commentaries to his writings. So far
only a few texts referring to his works have been identified, such as mKhas grub Nor bzang
rGyamtsho's Kiilacakra commentary Omament ofStainJessLight (Dri med 'odkyi rgyan), Go
rams pa's Distinguishing the li'iews (ITa baY shan 'byed), and writings of Tsong kha pa and .
mKhas grub rje on Guhyasamaja
8
, which criticize some of his views. Go rams pa reproaches
Red mda' ba for going too far in considering the adherents of Empty of other-nature (gzhan
stong) to be heretics (Phyi rol pa). This text by Go rams pa was recently printed together with
Red mda' ba's Madhyamakavatiiracommentary in one book (Beijing 2003) under the title dBu
mao No doubt there are other works dealing with some of Red mda' ba's theses, specially within
2 Chapter 1
the Kalacakra, 10 nang and gZhan stong literature. According to Cyrus Stearns' Buddha of
Dolpo, Red mda' ba is considered to be a "detennined enemy" of the 10 nang tradition and the
teachings of the Kalacakra (1999: 59).
On the other hand, some contemporary Sa skya scholars argue that Red mda' ba's writings
could be considered 'non-sectarian', because he only explains Indian root texts without citing
or refuting any Tibetan scholars. To verify this claim would require a full study of his works,
which falls beyond the scope of the present work. Rather my aim here is to lay the basis for such
studies by analyzing Red mda' ba's extensive biography, which was long lost.
Red mda' ba was the teacher of many famous scholars, and in particular he taught scholastic
philosophy to the three main founders of the Tibetan dGe lugs tradition: Tsong kha pa Blo
bzang grags pa, rGya1 tshab Dar ma rin chen (1364-1432) andmKhas grub dGe legs dpal bzang
(1385-1431\). This fact alone, which is hardly mentioned anywhere, justifies a detailed study of
this pivotal figure. Through his disciples, who founded a new tradition, he clearly had a formati-
ve, ifunderacknowledged, influence on the development of Tibetan Buddhism. By the end of
Red mda' ba's life, his instructions had been channeled into the foundation of the dGe lugs pa
tradition, and in consequence weakened not only the remaining branch of the Sa skya tradition,
but also the rNgog tradition of gSang phu. Despite his impact on his students, Red mda' ba
himself seems to have not become part ofthe new tradition, which is widely considered to have
been started with the foundation or inauguration of dGa' Idan monastery 140911 0 in dBus 9 just
three years before his death far off in Mang yul Gung thang.
IO
Subsequent dGe lugs pa ad-
herents tended to credit their three main founders as the creators of the new system, and it may
be precisely for this reason that Red mda' ba became a controversial figure and was no longer
favored or studied much by either subsequent Sa skya or dGe lugs scholars.
Purpose of the Study
The purpose of the present study is to close a gap in our knowledge ofthe nebulous figure Red
mda' ba by studying his 'large biography' (mam thar chen mo) and the short autobiography
(rang mam)that is included in it. This will help us better understand Red mda' ba's impact on
the development of Tibetan Buddhism during one of its crucial doctrinal transitions. Such an
analysis was not previously possible because no one had access to the texts concerned. Already
in the 19th century in Tibet, Red mda' ba's Large Biographywas listed as a rare scripture. For
a long time it was regarded as lost. Recently a few photocopies of a manuscript appeared, which
turned out to belong to a group oftexts which had probably been confiscated by the traditional
Tibetan government and moved to Drepung monastery, where according to Gene Smith they
became part of the library of the dGa' Idan Pho brangY
Also missing until recently were Red mda' ba's Minor Works (gSung thor bu), from which
parts of the biography stem, especially his autobiography. These Minor Works form the only
volume of his Collected Works (gSung 'bum)that we have so far. 12 According to Gene Smith
13
,
blockprints of most of the works collected in his gSung 'bum were never carved, and so it is
unlikely that they were ever banned as was the fate of many other controversial texts. Producing
blockprints of large works was expensive in the early period and could only be undertaken
Introduction
3
through the financing of a rich patron. Furthermore, as noted above, Red mda' ba had an
unusual and slightly controversial position because of his relationships with rJe Tsong kha pa
and his two spiritual sons (rJe yab sras gsum). In the end, Red mda' ba's Collected Workswere
never printed. 14
The biographies of the three above-mentioned disciples of Red mda' ba provide some
information that help understand the life of Red mda' ba. The biography of rGyal tshab rje
15
and
his Records of Teachings Received (gsan yig) unfortunately are not included in his Collected
Works. Dar ma rin chen, born in 1364, became one of the seven closest disciples of Red mda'
ba after becoming a novice with mKhan chen Rin chenrgyal mtshan at the age often in gNas
mying
16
He studied especially with Red mda' ba up to 1388. At the age of twenty-five he re-
ceived b h i k ~ u ordination from Red mda' ba. Dar ma rin chen was also the [lIst person who ob-
tained the academic title ofa 'Master of the Ten Scriptures' (bKa' bcu pa) in Sa skyamonastery
and other monastic centers. Only in summer of 1397 did he become one ofTsong kha pa' s main
disciples. Interestingly, Red mda' ba was also the teacher of 'Dul 'dzin Grags pa rgyal mtshan
(1374-1434)17, who was counted as one of the original group "Tsong kha pa and his two main
disciples" (rJe yab sras gsum), but is understood to have been later replaced by rnl<has grub rje
and seems not to have have enjoyed wide support thereafter. He also composed a biography of
Red mda' ba, which is still missing.
But luckily now, for the [lIst time, we have access to the Large Biography of Red mda' ba,
who was not only the teacher of these four prominent dGe lugs pa scholars, but also of such
illustrious figures as Bla ma rMi lam pa brTson ' grus seng ge (also known as Bla ma dBu rna
pa), and Thang stong rgyal po (136l-1485Y
s
.
For further studies of Red mda' ba, the contextual background of his biography can guide our
selection from among the available texts authored by him. At the beginning of my research into
the significance of Red mda' ba I had to rely on catalogs such as the Sa skya pa 'i dkar chag.
From these catalogs however I learnt about the main topics that were of concern to Red mda'
ba, and that many of his writings were missing. His works had been collected in twelve volu-
mes, which are no longer available as a complete set. As noted in the list oflocations given in
Ku se A pad Yon tan bzang po, et. al (Delhi 1987: 4Oy9 manuscript sets of the twelve volumes
20
of the gSung 'bum of Red mda' ba were located at such places as Sa skya, Ngor, 'Dar Grang mo
che, and Nyang stod rTse chen. In recent years, several of the works included in his gSung 'bum
became available again. For example, in 1999 the International Buddhist Academy (IBA) in
Kathmandu [lIst published two volumes of the Collected Works (gSung 'bum) of Red mda' ba,
which contain five of his major writings, including his commentaries on the Pramiipavarttika,
the Abhidhannasamuccaya, and the Millamadhyamakakiirikii. Furthermore large parts of his
Minor Works (gSung thor bu)have been published now.
21
Also another four works which have
not yet been officially released by the Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center (TBRC) have been
very kindly made available to be considered for this work. They may be published by Guru
Lama (Kathmandu) in the next few years. Thus the time seems ripe to turn our attention to the
life and works of Red mda' ba.
The Large Biography of Red mda' ba was composed by his direct disciple mNga' ris pa
Sangs rgyas rtse mo (b. 14th cent.Y2 in the [lIst half of the 15th century. The critical edition
4
Chapter 1
presented here has been drawn up on the basis of two dEli medmanuscripts, manuscripts A and
B. Manuscript A was frrst discovered by Leonard van der Kuijp in 1993 in the China Na-
tionalities Library of the Cultural Palace of Nationalities (CPN) in Beijing and numbers 39
folios. For some years, worldwide, only a few photocopies of ms. A were available. But in
March 2008 the text appeared in the TBRC archive?3 Manuscript B is a second exemplar, and
consits of 43 folios. It was also found in Beijing, and appeared in 2004 in the archive of the
TBRC in New York.
24
A few Western scholars have already referred to manuscript A, for
example Leonard van der Kuijp (1994a: 15), Cyrus Steams (1999: 292), and David Seyfort
Ruegg (2000: 61n13l). The only complete manuscript is manuscript A. Cyrus Steams had
received another photocopy of manuscript A from Leonard van der Kuijp in about 1993
25
,
which had been briefly discussed by van der Kuijp in an article published in 1994. However, the
exact location where manuscripts A and B are presently housed is unknown.
According to the shelf-numbers given on the front page of the negative microfrlm copies,
both manuscripts stem from the Drepung archive, but they are missing from the recently pub-
lished Drepung Catalog. However, a similar title does appear but is listed under a different
shelf-number. Thus far it has proven impossible to verify the contents of this work. According
to Gene Smith so far there seems to be no project to publish a collection of rare Sa skya texts as
was done for the bKa' gdams, rNgog, bKa' brgyud, and Jo nang texts, and it remains very diffi-
cult to obtain copies of them.
The microfrlm of manuscript B, of which the TBRC had copies (and of which I received
scans) was microfrlmed in Beijing before their return to the so-called Tibetan Autonomous Re-
gion (TAR). When the books were returned, none of them marked with the Drepung call
number were returned to Drepung, but rather were divided up by the TAR authorities and
distributed as they saw frt. Some went to Sera, some to Narthang, some to Zhwalu and still other
volumes went to individual scholars. There is a project headed by Zenkar Rinpoche to publish
a catalog of the books at Sera and Narthang. This will be arranged in the same way as the
Drepung Catalog and will include the old shelflistnumbers. We will then see what went where
and where it might now be found.
The central questions driving this research are: What role did Red mda' ba play at the turning
point from the pre-classical to the classical period of Tibetan Buddhist scholastics and what
stand did he take towards the most important philosophical questions of his times?
Our knowledge of the development of Tibetan scholasticism at the crucial time prior to the
formation of the dGe lugs school is very patchy. This thesis will make a contribution to this
freld of knowledge by examining the following issues: Red mda' ba's influence on the philo-
sophical curriculum and on the examination system in the Tibetan monasteries, by determining
his position in the lineages; the curriculum he himself went through; the places where he
obtained his training; identifying his teachers as well as his disciples, and the monasteries,
whose communities were influenced by his teachings. Thus a major gap in our knowledge of
medieval Tibet and of the development of Tibetan scholasticism will begin to be frlled.
To begin with, the study presents a critical edition of Red mda' ba's biography and its
English translation. It will be followed by Red mda' ba's contribution to the spiritual culture of
Buddhism, including his influence on an important reform of philosophical studies and dialec-
Introduction 5
tics, his restructuring and extending of the scholastic system of education and exams in the
monasteries and his decisive contribution to Tsongkha pa'sfounding of the dGe lugs pa school.
The primary purpose of the present project is to make this rare text available to the scholarly
public in order to broaden the textual basis for understanding the biography of Red mda' ba and
to throw light on his life story by providing what is the fIrst extensive exposition of his biogra-
phy by a Westerner.
Main thesis:
The rise ofPrasangika Madhyamaka in Tibet is commonly still mainly attributed to Tsong kha
pa and the dGe lugs pa (cf. Cabez6n and Dargyay 2007: 49; Dreyfus and McClintock, eds.
2003: 26, 85n8, 175,211,257/58). In shaping their own identity as a school (choslugs) distinct
from all others, the dGe lugs pa minimized their founder's, i.e., Tsong kha pa's, reliance on the
Madhyamaka teachings of others, in particular that of Red mda' ba. Although Red mda' ba is
mentioned in dGe lugs lists of important teachers, and was recognized as one ofTsong kha pa's
inain teachers, his Collected Works however were neither printed by the big monastic presses
nor were they part of the intellectual discourse oflater dGe lugs scholars. When nowadays, in
dGe lugs pa circles, Red mda' ba's name is mentioned, it is mainly in connection with the arisal
of the famous praise of Tsong kha pa as Maiijusrl and Avalokitesvara (dmigs brtse ma), which
originally was a praise of Red mda' ba by Tsong kha pa (cf. English translation of Sangs rgyas
rtse mo, chapter 6, section 2.1.3). Red mda' ba is said to have changed the one line that
mentions his name and changed it to a praise of Tsong kha pa, which down to the present day
is recited by dGe lugs pa adherents with great commitment.
26
From the time of the Fifth Dalai
Lama on Red mda' ba's main biography was listed as rare, which did not exactly correspond to
the factual reality. It seems that it was confIscated and thus removed from circulation. Also Red
mda' ba's Collected Works, although they are not considered to have been banned, are missing.
Only a few of Red mda' ba's works such as his commentary on NiigiiIjuna 's "Letter to a Friend"
remained continuously as independent works in circulate. For sure this can have different
reasons. However, only lately have many of his works gradually begun to appear amid various
Tibetan monasteries and research institutions.
The present work, based on an analysis of Red mda' ba's biography, will prove that Red mda'
ba gZhon nu blo gros played a crucial role in reintroducing the Prasangika Madhyamaka
thoughts into the scholastic debate of Tibet at the time of the transition from a pre-classical to
aclassical period. He has been largely overlooked, in part because he stood at the very begin-
ning of a new period but was eclipsed by his three famous disciples, the founders of the new
dGe lugs pa tradition. Furthermore, this study will shed some light on the influence Red mda' ba
had on Tsong kha pa and rGyal tshab rje in formulating the scholastic thinking and educational
system typical of the dGe lugs school. Thus it will revise our hitherto understanding of the
. origins of dGe lugs scholasticism.
In detail I want to provide evidence for the following theses:
1. Red mda' ba was the true reviver of the Prasangika Madhyamaka
27
tradition in Tibet. He
reintroduced the study of CandrakIrti's Madhyamakiivatiira and thus introduced the fIfth
6
Chapter 1
course of study of the so-called "Five Scriptures" (bKa' pod Inga) studies of the scholastic
tradition in medieval Tibet, which continues in the dGe lugs tradition in their dEu ma
studies. The previous studies of dEu ma topics in Tibet consisted of study ofthe Svatantrika
Madhyamaka view only, set within the framework of the Phar phyin studies.
2. Red mda' ba established the curriculum of a 'Master of the Ten Scriptures' (bKa' bcu pa).
His disciple rGyal tshab, successor of Tsong kha pa and first dGa' ldan throne holder (dGa'
ldan khri pa), achieved the academic title of a Master of the Ten Scriptures before Red mda'
ba sent him to Tsong kha pa and before he met Tsong kha pa nine years later and went on to
become his disciple.
3. Red mda' ba did not condemn the Jo nang pa's view and the Kalacakratantra wholesale.
Although he and his disciple Tsong kha pa initially studied these two traditions, later in their
lives they questioned and refuted some significant views related to them.
4. Philosophically Red mda' ba and Tsong kha pa's view of the Prasa.ngika Madhyamaka
doctrine did not differ essentially. Both agree that Candraklrti's Prasa.ngika is the only correct
interpretation ofNagfujuna and thus imperative to achieve a direct perception (mngon sum,'
emptiness (stong siinyatii).
5. Red mda' ba made great contribution to intensify the 'pure practice of view and conduct. '
6. The lineage of Sa skya as upheld by Red mda' ba mutated into a separate tradition, that is, the
dGe lugs tradition, and thus ceased to be transmitted as part of the Sa skya tradition. Another
stream of the Sa skya tradition, which still continues today, gained the upper hand over that
transmitted by Red mda' ba, namely that of his competitor g. Yag ston and his disciple Rong
ston, whose last students included Sakya mChog ldan and Go rams pa bSod nams seng ge,
the author of the compulsory scholastic textbooks (yig cha) that are mainly studied today
within the Sa skya tradition.
7. Many contemporaries of Red mda' ba and Tsong kha pa felt disturbed by their views. The
main topics of their debate are elucidated by means of Red mda' ba's biography compiled by
mNga' ris pa Sangs rgyas rtse mo.
8. Red mda' ba's influence on the dGe lugs tradition was far greater than is commonly assumed.
9. The reason why Red mda' ba appears to us as a rather obscure figure is that he comes to us
in fragments due to his partial disappearance from historical records. This resulted from
several factors, including: a) the fact that his large biography presented here was rare and for
a long time missing, b) that a second rare biography of his, composed by 'Dul 'dzin Grags pa
rgyal mtshan, is still missing, c) that his Collected Works and his Records of Teachings
Received (gSan yig) are still missing, d) that likewise the biography and the Records of
Teachings Received of rGyal mtshab Dar rna rin chen and parts of Tsong kha pa's Records
a/Teachings Receivedare missing, e) and that there are no sub-commentaries on Red mda'
ba's writings, and although some of his writings were once used as the scholastic textbooks,
they are no longer.
Introduction
7
Overview
The present study consists of nine main chapters followed by two appendices.
Chapter 1 provides a general introduction to the purpose and significance of the study as well as
this overview. The chapter concludes by limiting the topic and describing the methodology
applied.
Chapter 2 gives an outline of the present state of research exploring the major issues of this
thesis while providing a review of the literature on each topic, mainly taking up works of
European language sources. These will be considered here to the extent that they have not
Iilieady been mentioned in the introduction. The chapter deals with literature regarding Red mda'
bit's general role in Tibetan Buddhism as one of the main teachers ofTsong kha pa, as well as on
his role in the history of Madhyamaka, within the synthesis of the rNgog pa and Sa skya pa
lineages, his influence on the Jo nang tradition, and his attitude towards the Kala-
". crucratantra. Furthermore, research will be surveyed with regard to his influence on the Tibetan
. monastic education system and his impact on the Sa skya and dGe lugs traditions.
Chapter 3 discusses the primary historical sources on Red mda' ba's life.
Chapter4presents a detailed introduction to the text edition and an overview of the primary and
textual witnesses that have been considered here.
, Chapters 5 and 6 are the main part of this study. Chapter 5 presents a text edition of Red mda'
ba's Large Biography (rNam thar chen mo) by Sangs rgyas rtse mo. Chapter 6 contains a
complete annotated English translation.
'Chapter 7 gives an overview of Red mda' ba's writings with a table of concordance and a
." aetailed index of his Minor Works-in the dbu medmanuscript, vol. nga, of the twelve volumes
. of his Collected Works.
i::hapter 8is a summary of the life of Red mda' ba with a Tabular Curriculum Vitae of him.
Chapter 9provides the conclusions with regard to the main and secondary theses stated in the
introduction. It will show that more attention and research are needed, and that the basis for
. further research has been laid out herein.
'This will be followed by two appendices, including parts of Red mda' ba's autobiography (rang
!Dam) missing in Sangs rgyas rtse mo (Appendix A), Red mda' ba's polemic Letter to the
[Great] Teacher (i.e., to the Buddha), in 25 verses with English translation (Appendix B), and a
pibliography. The text is supplemented by an index that contains all the proper names
. in the biography, including variants of Tibetan names of persons and places as well
as various technical terms.
8
Chapter 1
Limiting of the Topic and Methodology
The present study seeks mainly to clarify Red mda' ba's role in the intellectual tradition of
Tibetan Buddhism as a whole and his formative impact on the development of the Tibetan
scholastics, including its curriculum and dialectics. In pursuit of that aim, this study also
presents particular philosophical debates recounted by mNga' ris pa Sarigs rgyas rtse mo, the
author of Red mda' ba's biography, translated here for the first time. As outlined above, the
main aim of this thesis is to explore Red mda' ba's important contributions during the crucial
transition from the pre-classical to the classical period of Tibetan Buddhist scholasticism.
An understanding of the text clearly requires a broad knowledge of its cultural, historical and
literary contexts, yet for the purposes of this study, I will only provide background material to
elucidate practices and conceptual categories that are not yet widely known within Tibetology.
For example, Red mda' ba's biographer mentions the traditional practice of completing scholas-
tic studies through going on a debate round (grwa skor) to other monasteries, often starting in
one's own monastery, the full significance of which has been overlooked by early studies such
as Kaschewsky (1971). I aim to contribute to our understanding of Red mda' ba and his impact,
as a neccessary foundation for a thorough future analysis of Red mda' ba's writings in compari-
sion with the related works by other scholars.
Other limits that had to be set to the scope of the present work included that I could not fully
trace all the numerous shorter and longer quotations from other texts in Red mda' ba's biogra-
phy. In most cases no precise sources are given. Although many could be identified, especially
the longer quotations, the source of several short citations remains still undisclosed. It will re-
quire a thorough study of all the writings of Red mda' ba, as well as of all the colophons of the
writings of his main disciples. Although a start has been made, such an exhaustive study
remains a desideratum.
Red mda' ba's lIdinor Works:, of which we have thus far a manuscript with 335 folios, contain
among other things at least fifty-five letters to disciples, sponsors and other persons. These have
not yet been studied in detail, but references have been provided in notes to the English trans-
lation of the biography, wherever some link exists between a person or topic mentioned in the
biography and the respective minor work. A list of contents of rJe btsun Red mda' ba' s Minor
Works together with his writings mentioned in his biography is provided in chapter 7.
Furthermore, Tsong kha pa's lIdinor Works contain several letters to or praises of Red mda'
ba. These need to be studied separately. As an aid to other scholars, my unpublished MA thesis
(2003: 125-27) identifies and lists the relevant sources.
28
In time, other references to Red mda' ba will be found in biographies of contemporaries. This
study was able to consider some details in biographies of rGyal tshab rje, mKhas grub rje, Sakya
mChog ldan, and Thang stong rgyal po, but leaves for the future the task of reviewing other
biographies.
Within these limits my methodology has been mainly historical and philological. I have
undertaken this academic project within the studies of Tibetan language with its literature,
taking into account the historical and cultural contexts, including the philosophy of Tibetan
Buddhism. This study should be understood as a work of textual philology and text editing
Introduction
9
using the basics of the method of textual criticism as laid down by Paul Maas (1957) and
Gerhard Jager 1990
29
, combined with the methods of historiography, using historical methods
as explained by Barzun and Graff in The Modem Researcher. I will explain in detail my method
of editing in the introduction to the edition below (chapter 4).
As will be further presented below in the discussion oftextual materials, we are dealing here
with narrative and literary sources, including biographies, among other genres. Our main source
is the biography of an ecclesiastical leader - a hagiographyO - written by a disciple, who con-
sidered the main figure to be a saint or holy person. In Tibetan, this genre is referred to as mam
thar, "[story of] complete liberation'!. There is no need to describe this genre in detail here,
since this has already been done very capably by scholars much more qualified than myself,
such as Gyatso (1998), Dargyay (1988), Vostrikov (1970: 180-98), and Kaschewsky (1971: 21-
35). Eva K. Dargyay (1988) has shown, King Srong btsan sgam po serving as an example, that
"Tibetanmam dJarrecords a person's way ofliberation, ornirvar;ta, and therefore secular events
are of subordinate importance," but this does not mean that we can relinquish important histori-
cal information included in this genre. Van der Kuijp (1996: 40) emphasizes, autobiographies
and biographies such as our text here must be included among Tibet's vast corpus of his to rio-
graphic literature, and "bear testimony to an approach to history that is different from the
Indian" one.
The Buddhist biography under study here is somewhat different from what Robinson descri-
bes as 'myth' (1996: 58) when studying the Caturasitisiddhapravrtti(Tib. Grub thob brgyad cu
tsa bzhi'i 10 rgyus), in English, The Lives of the Eighty-fOur Siddhas. He prefers to see these
accounts as "Buddhist myths," although he acknowledges that they do have some historical
dimension. While the siddhas "are not simply products of a religious or literary imagination"
and indeed have developed certain doctrines and practices, he describes them as "real characters
who perform seemingly unrealistic deeds" (1996: 63).
As will be discussed further below, Red mda' ba's biography contains both formalized
traditional hagiographical elements and personal biographical information of high historical
value.
The biography also incorporates parts of a short autobiography by Red mda' ba. Autobiogra-
phical passages that have been omitted by the Tibetan author have been identified in Red mda'
ba's Minor Works and are translated in Appendix A. The special genre of autobiography is
discussed in detail in Janet Gyatso's Appan'tions of the Se1f(1998). She mainly deals with a
specific "secret autobiography," but also describes the differences between biography and
autobiography in general (1998: 6, 101-23).
In short, there is no need to doubt the usefulness of this traditional biography for historical
studies, simply because the author, as a disciple of the main figure, has faith in Red mda' ba and
maintains a consistently positive attitude towards him.
Modelling of Red mda' ba's Biography on the Biography of the Buddha
One thing to note when reading this biography is that, similar to many Tibetan biographies, it is
pattemed after biographies of Buddha Sakyamuni.32 It includes such standard elements as
10
Chapter 1
accounts ofrniraculous signs at birth and death as well as other features that appear among the
four or twelve exalted deeds of the Buddha.
A similar pattern and feature are found, for example, in several biographies in Y ongs 'diin Ye
shes rgyal mtshan's collection Lam rim bla ma brgyud pa'i mam tharas well as in his des-
cription of the life of dGe slong rna dPal mo This model is also reflected in
biographies composed by other authors, for example, in several biographies of Tsong kha pa,
and in biographies of Indian masters such as Vasubandhu, Dignaga and so on.
33
The inclusion of such easily identifiable narrative motifs of Tibetan hagiographical writing
is a way of signaling the sanctity of the person, but is no reason to dismiss the remainder of the
work, which often include extensive historical data with no appreciable supernatural element.
As an aid to reading the following biography, it may be useful here to list the deeds of the
Buddha that we will fmd echoed in Red mda' ba's biography. There are various presentations of
the so-called "Twelve Deeds of the Buddha"34 in script and painting. Many of these "deeds" can
be found in Tibetan Buddhist biographies, usually at least the four main deeds (birth, en-
lightenment, turning the wheel of dharma, and passing into nirvfu).a), but also others among the
twelve. The following is a standard presentation from the MahiiyiinottaratantrasiistrEP:
1. Transmigration from [to this world] and Entering the Womb of the Mother
2. Taking Birth
3. Activities of Youth
4. Life in the Palace
5. Renouncing the World
6. Practicing Asceticism
7. Reaching Enlightenment by Overcoming Mara
8. Turning the Wheel of Dharma
9. Converting Tlrthika.Teachers and Devadatta
10. Performing Miracles
11. Passing into ParinirvaI).a
12. Continuing to be Present in the Eight Portions of Relics
One can fmd the following corresponding twelve episodes in the biography of Red mda' ba,
although partly in a different order:
1. Prophecy by the Buddha and Former Lives (see section 2.4) - comparable to the jiitakas.
2. Taking Birth (in a famous family, along with miraculous signs) (see section 2.5)
3. ActivitiesofYouth (childhood, education, entering the Dharma) (see section 2.5)
4. Living in the Palace (statement that he will become a great ruler of Sa skya or brighten the
Buddha's teaching) (see section 2.5)
5. Renouncing the World (taking the sriimar;tera vows to make his life meaningful) (see
section 2.5.3)
6.
7.
s:
Introduction
11
Practicing Asceticism (see section 2.9 ethics and especially section 2.9.1 his "Instruction
on the Conduct of a SramaJ:}.a," and section 2.9.2 Bodhisattva Ethics)
Reaching Enlightemnent by Overcoming Mara (see section 2.10: determination to go into
retreat and accomplishments of mahamudrii., and section 2.11 signs of meditative accom-
plishment, section 2.11.49 dream of attaining Buddbahood before Tsong khapa)
Turning the Wheel of Dharma (see section 2.7 gathering disciples and authoring books)
. '9. - Converting Trrthika Teachers and Devadatta (see section 2.6 defeating scholars who are
holding the wrong views of etemalism and nihilism, including section 2.6.3.2 failed
attempt on Redmda' ba's life)
) o. Performing Miracles (see section 2.11, such as section 2.11.9, interaction with a spirit, and
section 2.11.26, healing of an insane woman)
11. Passing into Parinirvfu].a (see sections 2.13-2.17)
12. ContinuingJo be Present in the Eight Portions of Relics (see sections 2.21-2.24)
"State of Research
'this section surveys our present knowledge of Red mda' ba and his position within Tibetan
sCholasticism excluding the information derived from his biography, which will be presented in
"the chapters 5 and 6. Although no other monograph has been devoted to Red mda' ba gZhon nu
,'blo gros in either Tibetan or any European language, he appears recurringly in historicai,
,biographical, and philosophical works. A good deal can be learned by extracting from those
which we may explore here as a foundation for the fuller picture that emerges from the
: biography.
'?LSnellgrove and Richardson (1986: 180) briefly note that Red mda' ba appears as one of the
"'teachers who most influenced Tsong kha pa. From Tsong kha pa's biography, given in great
detail in Kaschewsky (1971), we learn that Tsong 1a pa met Red mda' ba first in 1375 and
ifrtquently studied and met with him up to 1402. Two other disciples of Red mda' ba, rGyal
fshab rje (1364-1432) and mKhas grub rje (1385-1438), later became Tsong kha pa's main
and co-founders of his dGe lugs pa school. Kaschewsky (1971: 216, 217) gives short
;J>ibgraphies of both.
/Ji':We can glean from these sources about rGyal tshab that he first met Tsong kha pa in Rab
;'ong in gNyal stod in 1397. Earlier, among other teachers, he studied with Red mda' ba, who
'Was also one of his ordination masters when receiving ordination (cf. Kaschewsky 1971:
'216). Van der Kuijp's studies of the life and thought ofmKhas grub rje (1985b: 75-106) and
'Cabezon's introduction to mKhas grub's Dose ofEmptiness(1992: 14-16), together with some
:ofuer sources, give a partial picture of Red mda' ba's relationship with mKhas grub. In summa-
sources reveal that mKhas grub, born in gTsant6, spent his early years at places like
ring and Sa skya. He had been trained by Red mda' ba from the age of seven onwards. At
of twenty, in 1405, he received his :full ordination from Red mda' ba.
37
Afterwards, in the
1407, in his 23rd year oflife, he was sent by Red mda' ba to study with Tsong kha pa, who
at the time in Se ra chos sding.
38
4.,;-",.
Jackson (1985: 26, 31) and van derKuijp (1985c: 11-13) show which Madhya-
iiiiika transmissions came through Red mda' ba down to mKhas grub and the Fifth Dalai Lama
dbang Blo bzang rgya mtsho. Regarding the Prarnfu}.a transmissions that Red mda' ba
passed on, one needs to consider van der Kuijp (1983: 314) as well as Jackson (1987: 134, 141-
;(43,145).
In addition, other scholars have noted in passing some of Red mda' ba's impact on and
interactions with other scholars, most often in wOlks' focusing on the biography ofTsong kha pa .
.As early as 1882, Sarat Chandra Das mentions that after Tsong kha pa had been admitted to bDe
monastery in dBus, he took up his studies with such famous masters as Bla ma dBu ma
pa and Red mda' ba. As we will see from Sangs rgyas rtse mo' s biography of Red mda' ba, Bla
PladBumapa was one ofRedmda' ba's disciples (see chapter 6, section 2.7.6). Filchner(1933)
14
Chapter 2
mentions that Tsong kha pa received teachings from the "eminent scholar Red mda' ba Kumara-
mati" in Sa skya.
Other scholars have also noted Red mda' ba's impact, such as Obermiller (1935),'Tucci
(1949), Roerich (1949Y9, and Wylie (1962: 193n743). All of these have already been considered
in the extensive analysis of Tsong kha pa's biography Source of All Happiness (bDe legs kun
gyi 'byung gnas) composed by BIo bzang tshul khrims (1740-1810), translated by Kaschewsky
(1971), who also considers some additional sources. For our understanding of Red mda' ba's
life this study by Kaschewsky will be taken into account, as will that of Robert Thurman (1982),
who mentions events related to Red mda' ba several times in his summary of the Tsong kha pa
biography Ford to Faith (Dad pa 'i 'jug ngogs), composed by mKhas grub rje. Some other
Tibetan biographies will also be considered where appropriate, first of all Tsong kha pa's rNam
thar chen mo by 'Brug rGyal dbang Chos rje BIo bzang 'phrin las mam rgyal (b. 19th cent.).
Contemporary dGe lugs pa scholars consider this to be the most important of his biographies; it
has not yet been translated.
For interpreting the biography of Red mda' ba and gaining an understanding of his role in the
development of Tibetan Buddhism and the monastic education system, the more important
works are those of Sato (1983) van der Kuijp (1983), Jackson (1988), Onoda (1992), Jackson
(1994a), Tauscher (1995), Kapstein (1996), Dreyfus (1997), Kramer (1997), Everding (1998),
Naga (1999), Stearns (1999), and (Tauscher 1999). One should also note the more recent
contributions by Tarab Tulku (2000), Everding (2000), David Seyfort Ruegg (2000 and 2002),
Dreyfus (2003), Dreyfus and McClintock, eds. (2003). Ehrhard (2004), Cabezon and Dargyay
(2007), and Stearns (2008}
Red mda' ba's Impact on the History of Tibetan Buddhism
As indicated above, no scholarly work to date has specifically focused on Red mda' ba and his
contributions, although a number of his works have been translated and prefaced by
introductory biographical materiaL This lack of research calls into question our present state of
understanding of Tibetan intellectual history. Red mda' ba was listed among the eminent
scholars, but these references were not followed up with dedicated research. The Intemational
Encyclopaedia of Buddhism (Tibet, vol. 66) and Naga (1999: 708) show that sDe srid Sangs
rgyas rgya mtsho (1653-1705lo as well as A khu Shes rab rgya mtsho (1803-1875) name the
following eminent scholars as most important for the development of the monastic education
system:
1. rNgog Legs pa'i shes rab (11. cent.l
l
and his nephew
2. rNgog 10 tsa ba Blo ldan shes rab (1059-1109),
3. Phywa pa Chos kyi seng ge (1109-1169),
4. Sa skyaPal}.gita (1182-1251),
5. dU yug pa Rigs pa'i seng ge (d. 1253),
6. mChims 'Jampa'i dbyangs (b. 13th cent),
7. Kun mkhyen mTsho sna ba Shes rab bzang po (b. l3thcent.),

. 9."
. Tb.
State of Research
rJe btsun Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros (1348-1412),
Kun mkhyen Bu ston rin po che Rin chen grub 13 64)42,
'Jammgon Tsongkhapa chen po Blo bzang grags pa (1357-1419),
, :>r ,:
11. rGyal tshab Dar ma rin chen,
: "j. -
;17. mI(has grub dGe legs dpal bzang,
13. dGe 'dun grub, the First Dalai Lama,
.. 14. dGe 'dun rgya mtsho, the Second Dalai Lama,
is. the Eighth Karma pa Mi bskyod rdo rje, and many others.
15
Also as part of a short biography ofBla ma dam pa bSod nams rgyal mtshan (1312-13 75), in the
fourth list of his supreme disciples, Mang thos Klu sgrub rgya mtsho (1993: 189.5-10) gives the
:following names of eleven famous great scholars (yongs grags kyi mkhas pa bcu gcig):
[Sa bzang] Ma ti Pa!}. chen (1294-1376),
"2, Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros (1348-1412),
:}.,
:'5.
;rr;:"f;-.
Ne rings pa 'Jam dpal rdo rje,
Theg chen chos rje Kun dga' bkra shis (1349-1425),
gNyagphu ba bSodnams bzangpo (1341-1433),
;,6. rTog ge pa dKar po dPalldan bzang po,
;:7. sGrub chen Bud[d]ha sri (1339-1419),
Karma [pal Rol pa'i rdo rje (1340-1383),
sPos khang pa Rin chen rgyal mtshan
43
,
lHa btsun bSam yas pa, and
Shar Tsong kha paBlo bzang grags pa (1357-1419).
: Since Red mda' ba appears in both lists, he must have been a key figure in his time. We also can
,draw this conclusions from the fact that after Khrirgyal bSod nams Ide, King ofMang yul Gung
'thang, passed away in 1404, Redmda' ba became the main teacher of the queen, mNga' bdag
Chos skyong rgyal mo (reign 1404- ca. 1419), who by relying on Red mda' ba dissociated
',herself more and more from the political influence of Sa skya (Everding 2000: 501, 508).
'furthermore, as we will see from the present study, in 1408 Red mda' ba also received an invita-
';tion and gifts from the Chinese Emperor and the King ofGu ge (see chapter 6, sections 2.11.45
imd 2.12.6).
AMain Teacher of Tsong kha pa
fFurthermore, the present study will show that Tsong kha pa spent much time with his main
Red mda' ba, and received from him not only transmissions of the Abhidharmakosa,
?f!adhyamakiivafiira, Abhidharmasamuccaya, and Pramiipavarttika, but also of the Instruction on
l/hc V'icw ofthc Middle Way, the Mental Purification (bIo sbyong), and the Guhyasamajatantra.
16
Chapter 2
He also played an important role in the transmission ofthe Yamantaka tantra. In many texts Red
mda' ba is described as one of the four main teachers (rtsa ba'i bla ma) of Tsong kha pa, but
among those Red mda' ba was unquestionably his foremost. Kaschewsky (1971: 24) lists
fourteen important teachers ofT song kha pa. The Viiil;1iJrya list he gives of fourteen is in princi-
ple identical with the list in Blo bzang 'phrin las mam rgyal's list in Tsong kha pa 'i mam thar
chen mo (1981: 478.14-479.20). His source is the same, the dGa'ldan chos 'byung, known as
Vail;1f1rya ser po by Sangs rgyas rgya mtsho (1653-1705). Tsong kha pa'i mam thar chen mo
(1981: 476.17-478.14) summarizes from whom Tsong kha pa received which teachings and
fmally mentions the following four teachers to whom he was most indebted (478.20-479.2):
1. Chos rje Don grub rin chen (1309-1385),
2. rJe btsun Red mda' ba (1348-1412),
3. Grub chen dPa' bo rdo rje (b. 14th century),
4. Las kyi rdo rje (1324/26-1401)44.
In the Gmbmtha' shel gyi me long(1985: 306.12.4) we fmd anotherlist offour teachers with
whom he studied mainly:
1. dBu ma brTson 'grus seng ge (b. 14th cent.),
2. mKhan chen Nam mkha' rgya1 mtshan (1324/26-1401),
3. rJe btsun Red mda' ba (1348-1412),
4. Bra gor mKhan chen Chos skyabs bzang po (b. 13th cent.).
The latter list is identical with the one given by Kaschewsky (1971: 207):
1. dBu ma pa B1a ma brTson 'grus seng ge (b. 14th cent),
2. lHo brag Grub chen Nam mkha' rgya1 mtshan (1324/26-1401),
3. Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros (1348-1412),
4. Bra gor mKhan chen Chos skyab bzang po (b. 13th cent.).
But as mentioned above, Bla rna dBu ma pa was a disciple of Red mda' ba and in fact he acted
more as a kind of purported "translator" between Red mda' ba and MaiijusrI than as a teacher.
His Role in the History of Madhyamaka as the True Reviver of the Prasangika-
Madhyamaka Tradition
The biography will prove that Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros played a crucial role in reviving
the PrasangikaMadhyamaka view as part of the scholastic debate of Tibet at the time of the
transition from a pre-classical to a classical period. David Seyfort Ruegg stressed this point
already twice in the fIrst two volumes of his comprehensive studies ofMadhyamaka philosophy,
but still the rise of the Prasangika Madhyamaka in Tibet is commonly mainly attributed to
Tsong kha pa and the early dGe lugs masters, or better to say the dGa' Idan pa or dGe Idan pa.
45
State of Research
17
For example Cabez6n says in Cabez6n and Dargyay (2007: 49) that Go rams pa is reticent to
identify himself as exclusively Prasangika, since "fIrst, Tsong kha pa had already co-opted this
term." It is notable that the biography of Red mda' ba employs the Tibetan words for
svatantrika and Prasangika and gives valuable infonnation about Red mda' ba's role in the
process of reviving the Prasangika doctrine (see chapter 6, section 2.5.8). Later a controversy
arose among some passionate followers of the two famous teachers as to who had the more
correct Prasangika view, Red mda' ba or Tsong kha pa. Furthermore the biography conveys that
Red mda' ba referred to Gangs pa She'u, Khu mDo sde, 'Bar Pa tshabNyi rna grags, and ICe
sGom zhig po as "the great Madhyamikas in Tibet," (see section 2.8.1). This means that he
thought highly of those previous Tibetan masters who followed the dEu rna ThaI 'gyur ba
before him. Presumably when reviving Madhyamaka he sought out and carefillly studied their
writings. In this context, the Empty of self-nature (rang stong) and the Empty of other-nature
(gzhan stong) debate needs to be discussed, but the main purpose is to make clear the centrality
of Red mda' ba for the Prasangika Madhyamaka.
In his Three Studies in the History of Indian and Tibetan Madh yamaka Philosoph y(2000: 3-
7) Seyfort Ruegg divides the history of Tibetan Madhyamaka in Tibet into four periods and
again subdivides the third, described as the classical-systematic period - mainly the 14th to 16th
centuries - into four. The classical-systematic period was "the high point of Tibetan textual ex-
egesis, philosophical penetration and systematic hermeneutics. In this period there took place
the defInitive constitution as philosophical schools of the principal Tibetan orders (chos Jugs)."
These are:
1. rNying rna pa or rDzogs chen pa with Klong chen pa (1308-1363);
2. Sa skya pa with Madhyamaka masters claiming spiritual descent from Sa skya paJ;u;lita Kun
dga' rgyal mtshan such as Redmda' ba (1349-1412), Rong ston (1367-1449) and Go rams pa
(1429-1489);
3. dGa' ldan pa or dGe lugs pa with Tsong kha pa (1357-1419) and his disciples rGyal tshab
Dar rna rin chen (1364-1432), mKhas grub dGe legs dpal bzang (po) (1385-1438) and dGe
'dun grub (Dalai Lama I, 1391-1474);
4. bKa' brgyud pa with Kanna pa VIII Mi bskyod rdo rje (1507-1554) and 'Brug pa Padma
dkar po (1527-1592) - along with some smaller, but historically and doctrinally significant,
schools such as the Jo nang pa with Dol po pa (1292-1361).
Tauscher (1995: 10), adapting according to Seyfort-Ruegg (1980: 278) divides the development
of Tibetan Madhyamaka into two major historical periods: the early and later propagation, and
further subdivides the latter into three periods:
1. The "period ofreception" (end of 10th to 14th century), during which Tibetan scholars
reached a concept which was complete in itself through a process of gathering, systematizing
and interpretation of the Indian materials.
2. The "classical period" (14thto 16th century), which constitutes the peak and conclusion of
these earlier processes, and which ends with the full establishment of the religious, exegetical
18
Chapter 2
andhenneneutical traditions or rather "schools" (cJlOS JugS) of Tibetan Buddhism through the
fmal consolidation of the dGe lugs pa.
3. The "scholastic period" (16th century onwards), which is characterized by commentanal and
interpretative activity and takes place within the framework of the previously established
schools within their respective "curricula" (yig chaJ6.
Tauscher (1995: 13) places Red mda' ba's disciple Tsong kha pa Blo bzang grags pa (1357-
1419), posthumously considered to be the founder of the dGe lugs pa, at the end of the second
period (phyi dar), while at the same time he began the "classical period," i.e., the second of the
three periods of the later propagation. Furthennore Tauscher (1995: 33) detects that in the
second half of the 14th century there occurred a revival of the studies of the Prasangika
Madhyamaka, which had been neglected before. In his view this tendency had probably been set
off by Red mda' ba, but Tsong kha pa provided the decisive breakthrough.
Supposing this assumption to be correct and Tsong kha pa indeed introduced a classical
period of Tibetan Madhyamaka in the second half of the fourteenth century, then Red mda' ba
must be placed either at the end of the 'period of reception' or between the first and second
period, that is, at the turning point from the pre-classical to the classical period. This placement
in a liminal period would help explain why he was overlooked in favor of his three famous
disciples. Another possibility is that we place Red mda' ba as the actual reviver of the Pra-
sangika Madhyamaka at the very beginning of the classical period, before Tsong kha pa, and
thus give him the credit to which he is entitled, as becomes eminently clear from his biography.
Seyfort Ruegg (2002: 154) explains in the second part of his Studies in Indian and Tibetan
Madhyamaka Thoughtthat he had already described Red mda' ba's place in the history of the
Madhyamaka (Part 1, Section 1, 4.3), and that there he makes clear that Red mda' ba gZhonnu
blo gros
composed works which are of special importance for tracing the development of the Tibetan
Madhyamaka in the second half of the fourteenth century. ( ... ) And it is to him that is indeed
ascribed the re-establishment and explication of the Prasangika Madhyamaka after a period of
relative eclipse, this school being stated to have all but died out before him (Seyfort Ruegg
2000: 60-61).
Seyfort Ruegg (2000: 60-66) summarizes Red mda' ba's role in Madhyamaka to a great extent
and leaves us with no doubt as to his importance for Tibetan Madhyamaka. While this
assessment has not been rejected so far, there seems to be still a certain amount of incertitude
and reluctance to fully adopt this view. For example, Dreyfus and McClintock (2003: 26) state:
Of course, the extent to which Tsong kha pa's innovations are truly original remains difficult
to assess, given that we do not have an adequate understanding of the ideas of some his
important predecessors such as Bla rna dam pa bsod nams rgyal mtshan and his student Red
mda' ba.
As we willleam from Sangs rgyas rtse mo's biography of Red mda' ba, although he was a
student of Bla rna dam pa bSod nams rgyal mtshan and intended to receive Madhyamaka
teachings from him, this was not possible (see chapter 6, section 2.5.8). Instead he studied with
State of Research
19
,['he Dharma Lord Byang chub seng ge (b. 14th cent.), and the Instruction on the Wew [of the
.' ,Middle WayJhe received from mKhan chen lDog lhod pa l{.un dga'bzang po (section 2.5.7).
Details on Red mda' ba's Madhyamaka view, achieved during his five-year-retreat in Gangs bu
'ie;are given in section 2.10.3.
", In general Sa skya scholars like Mang thos KIu sgrub rgya mtsho call Red mda' ba a main
/lliscip1e of Ny a dbon Kun dga' dpal (1285-1379), who was probably the most important disciple
" of the Jo nang pa Dol po pa Shes rab rgyal mtshan (1292-1361).47 Although Nya dbon is
traditionally said to have been the fountainhead oflater Tibetan Tshad rna exposition and the
teacher of the most influential Tshad rna scholars, including g.Yag ston Sangs rgyas dpal
(1348-1414), Red mda' ba and Tsong kha pa, for sure his knowledge was not limited to Pra-
'Iriru;ta. He was also a master ofParamita, and - important in this context - served as abbot of Jo
Jiang monastery, defending the Empty of other-nature (gzhan stong)theory (Jackson 1994: 103).
'Nya dbon became very upset with his disciple Red mda' ba, after he had composed his famous
polemic Letter to the [Great] Teacher (i. e., to the Buddha), criticizing the Jo nang pa's view (see
;:,\ppendix B). This was between 1375 and 1379 and probably marks an elementary turning point
,hot only in Red mda' ba's mind set, but also for the development ofTibetan Buddhist scholasti-
in its whole, which finally ended in the dominance of the dGe lugs pa tradition and the
of the non-dGe lugs schools in the domain of philosophical-dialectical studies (Dreyfus
,:"1997: 3'8). It finally lead to a very strict delimitation of the various schools (chos lugs) from
other, especially with regard to the view on Madhyamaka (cf. chapter 6, section 2.8).
{WEckel (2003: 175) points out that without knowing much more about the centuries of Mad-
hyiunaka interpretation that intervened between the time ofBhavaviveka (6th cent.) and Tsong
,;khapa, without a thorough study of Red mda' ba andhis sources, it would be difficult to speak
;;With any confidence about Tsong kha pa' s originality, and how much of his apparent innovation
be attributed to Red mda' ba.
L,;: Cabez6n (2003: 289-315) differentiates between two views in fourteenth and fifteenth
[century Tibet, a "hard" and a "soft" approach to the doxographical categories ofSvatantrika and
':j:>riisatigika distinction.
48
In his view, the hard is represented by Tsong kha pa, founder of the
;1:lGe lugs pa, and his teacher Red mda' ba, while the soft is ascribed to Rong ston pa (1367-
'1449)49 and Go rams pa (1429-1489). The latter is supposed to take an intermediary position
Dol po pa and Tsong kha pa. Referring in more detail to Red mda' ba's commentary on
the Madhyamakiivatiira, Cabez6n (295/96) states that the fact that especially Red mda' ba and
:&I's6ng kha pa
;
] .. ,' ;viewed Candraldrti's Prasangika as the only vaiIaintexpretation of the Madhyamaka, and as
the true purport of the Buddha's teachings (gsung rab kyi dgongs pa) - a position that may
well go as far back as Jayananda and Pa tshab - leads to a hard Svatantrika-Prasai:tgika
. distinction.
He taIls both, Tsong kha pa and his teacher Red mda' ba, "hard doxographers." Although they
have quite different theories, both agree that "CandrakIrti' s Prasatigika is the only unequivocally
correct interpretation ofNagarjuna, making the Prasatigika school, and this school alone, the
.BUddha's true intention" (298):
20
Chapter 2
In Red mda' ba's words, "the text of the four schools of tenets are mutually contradictory ...
and only the Madhyamaka path ofthe freedom from extremes (mtha' bral dbu ma 'i lam) is the
true purport of all of the Tathagata's teachings .... All of the special beliefs (held by the
philosophers of the different schools) from the Vijiianavadins on down are not established
even as conventional truths .... The system of the Arya Nagarjuna is the only correct interpreta-
tion of the Tathagata's word."
Further Cabez6n (2003: 301-02) says that the goal of Go rams pa's lTa ba 'i shan 'byed is
to argue for the superiority of his interpretation of the Madhyamaka - which Go rams pa,
following Red mda' ba, Rong ston pa, and other earlier Sa skya pa figures, calls the "Freedom
from Proliferations" (spros bral) theory of the Madhyamaka - vis-it-vis two rival interpreta-
tions prevalent in his day, that of the founder of the Jo nang pa tradition, Dol po pa shes rab
rgyal mtshan (1292-1361), and that of Tsong kha pa.
This needs further investigation, since - as will be discussed in the present study (chapter 6, sec-
tion 2.6.1) - Go rams pa reproaches Red mda' ba in his lTa ba 'i shan 'byed for going too far in
considering the adherents of Empty of other-nature (gzhan stong) to be heretics (phyi rol pa). So
the question arises, on which points Go rams pa agrees or disagrees with Red mda' ba. Cabe-
zan's remark (2003: 309n19) seems important to me, namely that Red mda' ba states in his De
kho na nyid gsal sgron, p. 28 that he has written about the difference between the Svatantrika
and Prasangika elsewhere and therefore will not treat the issue here:
It is difficult to know precisely, therefore, how Red mda' ba elaborated this distinction,
although we have clues from other portions of the De kho na nyid gsal sgron (104-05). That
Red mda' ba takes a position that is more akin to that ofthe earlier tradition of Jayananda and
rMa bya pa, and different from that taken by Tsong kha pa and Rong ston pa is discussed in
Cabez6n (1997): 100.
M. Sato (Morioka) (1983)50 stresses that the problem of Madhyamaka philosophy from Red
mda' ba to Tsong kha pa is a central historical one, considering that Red mda' ba was the first of
six famous Sa skya commentators
51
on Candraklrti's Madhyamakiivatiira. He explains that in the
Sa skya school we find support for rang stong and gzhan stong as well as priismiga and
svatantra, while the Ge lugs school commits itself to rang stong and prasmiga only. Further-
more Sato states that Tsong kha pa is seen to have been even more determined, after having
taken over Red mda' ba's view on prasmiga and thus is said to have given impetus to later
attacks by Sa skya scholars. In short, Red mda' ba was pivotal for the understanding of
Madhyamaka in Tibet.
Sato then refers to the Sa skya chapter in Thu'u bkwan's Grub mtha' she! gyi me long, where
it is explained that there were three tendencies ofthinking within the Madhyamaka
ofthe Sa skya school: 1) Sa pal)., Rong ston and others, who wanted to prove emptiness through
deduction, 2) Red mda' ba, who only applied the prasmiga method, and 3) Sakya mchog ldan,
who studied first the Madhyamaka philosophy, then the Vijnanavada, and finally the Io nang pa
State of Research
21
philosophy.52 S.ato further that it is difficult. to ascertain Red mda' point
view. Considenng Candralmtl' s Madhyamaka philosophy the correct one, ill the epIlogue to hIS
Madhyamakiivatiira commentary Red mda' ba expresses his concern that his way of under-
standing does not fmd acceptance among Tibetan scholars. This become even more clear from
Sang
s
rgyas rtse mo's biography, where he reports 1hat Red mda' ba felt he had not been
understood, and that when he died, his Madhyamaka view would die with him (see chapter 6,
section 2.8).
Further on, Sato points out that in the preface to his Madhyamakiivatiira commentary Red
mda' ba distinguishes three different dharmacakra periods: 1. teaching the four truths in Vara-
nasi, 2. the Prajilaparamita teaching, and 3. the SaIpdhinirmocanasiitra, and that Red mda' ba
must have linked the third with Madhyamaka. From the dGe lugs pa point of view, the second
is considered to be linked with the Madhyamaka school, while the third is linked with the Citta-
.matra point of view. 53 This needs further investigation too. According to Sato, towards the end
ofhis life, Red mda' ba considered the Vijilanamatra teachings to be subject to interpretation
(drang don, neyiirtha). He received a Guhyasamaj a empowerment and stayed as a hermit in the
mountains up to his death. He did not consider the Kalacakratantra to be a pure Buddhist tantra.
Sato then refers to various differences he sees between rJe btsun Red mda' ba and rJe Tsong kha
pa.
Tauscher (1995: 17n34) thinks that Red mda' ba differs from Tsong kha pa on fundamental
questions such as whether the two truths are identical or different, or with regard to the meaning
'of "satya"in the context of saIpvrtisatya. But to assess possible connections in terms of content
.between the two, he considers a more detailed analysis of the system of Red mda' ba to be
necessary. Although he mainly analyses the two tru1hs in Tsong kha pa's Madhyamaka works,
he refers several times to Red mda' ba. But a thorough study of Red mda' ba's works failed to
appear.
Sato (1983:243) points out that Red mda' ba's Madhyamakiivatiira commentary was the first
by a Sa skya pa author, reinforcing our understanding of his position as a trailblazer in the area
ofMadhyamaka, and in the preface to a translation of rGyal tshab' s commentary on AIyadeva 's
j?our Hundred, Geshe SonamRinchen and Ruth Sonam (1994: 23-24) make a similar assertion.
According to their short evaluation of this text:
It is a lucid and concise commentary which omits Dharmadasa's analogies. Ren-da-wa does
not always qualify the object of refutation as clearly as does Gyel-tsap nor does he give as
great importance to the establishment of conventional truths. Since Ren-da-wa was Gyel-tsab' s
teacher, it is possible that Gyel-tsab had access to this commentary and chose to stress points
which he felt required more attention, at the same time presenting the material in a different
format. Ren-da-wa concentrates on the meaning of the text, closely following Candrakirti's
presentation. He is not as intent as Gyel-tsap on summarizing the arguments and formulating
them according to the dialectic code. There are instances where Ren-da-wa's interpretation is
at variance with Gyel-tsap's more usual version ofthe Prasangika system based on Candra-
kirti's works.
22 Chapter 2
Seyfort Ruegg (2000: 61) mentions that in addition to these two commentaries by Red mda' ba,
those on the Millamadhyamakakadkii and the Prasannapadii are noteworthy, as well as his guide
to meditative realization of the theory (Ita khrid) of the Madhyamaka.
Jinpa (2002: 18), who briefly explores the historical and intellectual context of Tsong kha
pa's Madhyamaka, remarks, without specifying to which of the important Madhyamaka works
of Red mda' ba he is referring:
There is also an extant Madhyamaka work by Rendawa Shanu Lodra (1349-1412), the noted
Sakya master and the foremost teacher of Tsongkhapa, that may help us to discern the points
of divergence in Tsongkhapa's thought in the later part of his life.
Probably Jinpa refers here to Tsong kha pa's dGongs parab gsa!, his famous commentary on the
Madhyamakiivatiira, which he composed at the end of his life, in 1418 in dGa' 1dan (see
Kaschewsky 1971: 198), while Red mda' ba - as we will see from this study - must have fin-
ished his commentary on the Madhyamakiivatiira by 13 7417 5. Nowadays many Tibetan scholars
may feel that there is nothing in Red mda' ba's commentary that we cannot find in a more
precise form in other later commentaries, but it may be worth taking the opposite approach and
find out, whether there is anything in Red mda' ba's writings, which he pronounced fIrst, and
may have become a matter of course in later commentaries.
rJe btsun Red mda' ba's position in the Madhyamaka lineages and his impact on later devel-
opments becomes clear from putting his biography into the larger context of historical changes.
VanderKuijp (1985c: 11-13) and Jackson (1985: 26,31) analyze Tibetan materials, such as the
gSan yigofmKhas grub rje and the Fifth Dalai Lama, to provide a clearer picture of how the
Madhyamaka view was transmitted by Red mda' ba. So far he is mentioned to have transmitted
the Millamadhyamakakiidkii, the Prasannapadff, the CatufJiataka, the Madhyamakiivatiira, the
Dharmadhiifustava and the SlJhrllekha. Regarding Red mda' ba's role in the transmission of the
dBu ma ita khddlineage, Kapstein (1996: 282) notes:
From the 'History of the Hundred and Eight Guidebooks': Concerning the dBu ma chen pO'i
khIid ['The Guidance on the Great Middle Way,]54: it was received by the bodhisattva Zla ba
rgyal mtshan from the Newa Pe nya pa, who belonged to the lineage ofNagarjuna, father and
son [i. e., Nagiiljuna and Aryadeva]. He taught it to rDzi lung pa 'Od zer grags pa, and he to
Gro ston, who propounded it widely. There are some who hold that this was the lineage of the
dBu ma Ita kb.rid['The Guidance on the View of the Middle Way'] that came to the venerable
Red mda' ba from mNga' ris, in West Tibet, but that is uncertain.
55
This is [also] called the
gZhung phyi mo'i dbu ma ['The Middle Way according to the Original Texts', i.e., of
Nagiiljuna and Aryadeva], and so is the ancient tradition, not yet divided into Priisangika and
Svatantrika. That which is distinguished as the special doctrine of Red mda' ba, however, is
the unblemished adherence to the Prasangika tradition, that follows the text of the glorious
Candraldrti.
Kapstein (1996: 285n19) further states:
State of Research
Jo nang rJe btsun Kun dga' grol mchog, Khdd brgya'i brgyudpa'i 10 rgyus, plates 320-321, in
DNgDz, vol. 12. Zla ba rgyal mtshan, from whose teaching this tradition is derived, is best
known among Tibetans for his contributions to the development of the traditions pertaining to
. the worship and meditation of the bodhisattva Avalokitesvara. Red mda' ba (1349-1412) was
a noted scholar of the Sa skya pa sect, who was among the foremost teachers ofrJe Tsong kha
pa, and whose insistence on the authority of the Prasangika school of the Madhyamaka
interpretation was sometimes regarded as standing in complete opposition to those traditions
that claimed adherence to the Great Middle Way.
23
Thus, while Sato (1983: 244) says that in the Sa skya school, because of having two main
streams of transmission, we fInd both terms rang stongand gzhan stongas well as prasanga and
svatantra, Jo nang rJe btsun Kun dga' grol mchog notes that the ancient tradition was not
divided into Prasangika and Svatantrika (K.apstein 1996: 282). Huntington (2003: 68) points out,
that
we will probably never know, who coined the enormously influential terms Rang rgyud pa
(*Svatantrika) and ThaI 'gyur ba. (*Prasangika), ( ... ) but it seems likely that it was the
translator Pa tshab nyi rna grags (I 055-1145?), who began to use them in conjunction with his
study of Candraklrti.
Also Yo shimizu (2003: 257) admits that the division between the two Madhyamaka systems
have been already acknowledged in Tibet at the time of Tsong kha pa, but explains, how he
introduced a new criterion for distinguishing between Svatantrika and Prasangika, an
ontological shift in the values of autonomous reasoning.
Tauscher (2003: 207-09) defInes that after Pa tshab had "invented" the division ofPrasailgika
and Svatantrika, Phywa pa did not deal with it directly, but only with the validity of the use of
prasanga and svatantra, and that likewise the Sa skya pa master Grags pa rgyal mtshan (1147-
1216) did not utilize this division when discussing the Madhyamaka school, but distinguished
between Prasangika and Svatantrika, when discussing the two realities in a tantric context.
Also Grags pa rgyal mtshan's nephew Sa skya PaJ.}.9ita used the terms for establishing
of the Madhyamaka school, but Tauscher (2003: 211) attaches only limited
.relevance to the usage of these categories in the early texts, and states that strictly speaking the
discussion is not about the distinction of subschools, but is "inseparably connected with the
issue of the use of reductio ad absurdum (prasanga) or the independent syllogism (svatantra)."
However, in many ways Phywa pa's view of the Svatantrika-Prasangika distinction seems to
differ signifIcantly from the "new" dGe lugs pa distinction.
Cabez6n (2003: 292) raises the concern that
although it is true that the Svatantrika-Prasangika distinction seems to be virtually unknown to
the Indian Madhyamaka tradition, ( ... ) it is worth mentioning that Jayananda's Madhyama-
kiivatiirafikii does use the word Svatantrika twice in contexts where it clearly refers to
advocates of a position that he sees Candraklrti as opposing. Nonetheless it is interesting, and
24
Chapter 2
significant, that he calls his own position simply "the Madhyamaka" (dbu ina), without speci-
fying it as Prasangika.
56
Dreyfus (2003b: 317-18; 344n1) refers in his essay on the Svatantrika-Prasarigika distinction for
a view of the history of Tibetan Madhyamaka to Seyfort-Ruegg (2000: 41-72), and agrees that
the Svatantrika-Prasarigika distinction and the superiority of the latter seems to have been frrst
asserted by Pa tshab, and states:
Klong chen rab 'byams pa (1308-1363), for instance, stressed the importance of Prasangika
view in the practice of the Great Perfection (rdzogs chen, lit., Great Completion), ( ... ). Thus by
Tsong kha pa's time, the preenrinence of the Prasangika view was already fmnly inscribed in
the rhetorical field of the Tibetan tradition.
Thus Dreyfus (2003b: 319-20) skips Red mda' ba, and points out that Tsong kha pa's "aggres-
sive promotion of Prasarigika as the supreme Madhyamaka view" led to a polarization of
Tibetan Madhyamaka between Tsong kha pa's followers, i.e., the dGe lugs pa school, and their
opponents, and thus reflected the political situation of the country.
However, Sangs rgyas rtse mo's biography shows that Red mda' ba was the driving force for
the revival of Madhyamaka studies, giving superiority to the Prasarigika Madhyamaka, while
the mainstream remained focused on the Svatantrika view (see chapter 6, section 2.5.8).
According to Obermiller (1935: 325) also mKhas grub rje says of Red mda' ba that he
revived the regular and critical studies on Madhyamaka and logic in the universities ofTibet.
57
And Seyfort Ruegg (2000: 65) makes clear that
in the Sa skya pa school, Red mda' ba's Prasangika interpretation of the Madhyamaka co-
existed with Rong ston's (allegedly) Svatantrika theory, and also to a degree with Siikya mchog
Idan's Madhyamaka doctrine that was partly combined with the gzhan stong theory.
The Empty of other-nature (gzhan stong) tradition came into prominence in Tibet at the begin-
ning of the later propagation (Phyi dar). It is a synthesizing movement harmonizing the Madhya-
maka and the Vijnapti philosophy (mam par ng pa) depending on the Ratnagotravibhiiga, and
is opposed to the Empty of self-nature (rang stong) theory of the other Madhyamaka schools
(Seyfort Ruegg 1980: 277; 2000: 19).58
According to Steams (1999: 41) little is known about the early Tibetan proponents of the
Empty of other-nature:
Taranatha traces a hansmission lineage for what he refers to as "the instructions on the view
of the Zhentong Middle Way," as well as a separate lineage for the transmission of the
Kalacakra teachings passed down in the Jonang tradition.
Seyfort Ruegg (2000: 79) explains that Tsong kha pa and his followers criticized the gzhan
stong in its Jo nang pa version as presented by Dol po pa, which the latter considered to be "in
harmony with the Kalacakra." We do not know about Red mda' ba's stance towards the
instructions on the view of the gZhan stong Middle Way. It would bear investigating to see
whether what Steams (1999: 88) calls the Instruction on the View of the Emptiness of Other
(gZhan stong gi ita khrid)and the Instruction on the View of the Middle Way (dEll ma ita khrid) .
State of Research
25
that came through Redmda' ba to Sakyamchog Idan (1428-1507), are the same (see chapter 6,
section 2.5.7). However, Seyfort Ruegg (2000: 80) points out that Red mda' ba like rNgog 10
and Dar ma rin chen belonged to the Empty of self-nature (rang stong) tradition of the
Madhyamaka in both its Svatantrika and Prasangika branches.
An Influential Early Opponent of the Jo nang Tradition and the KiUacakratantra
The protracted and bitter doctrinal feud that ensued between the Jo nang tradition and other
schools, particularly that of the dGe lugs, can be traced directly back to the interventions of Red
mda' ba. While this has been noted by other scholars to varying degrees, Red mda' ba's biogra-
phy will provide us with a far fuller picture of those interventions than has been available to
date.
Tucci (1949: 118) asked:
Is Tson k'a pa an innovator, or rather does he continue preceding h'ends? From his biogra-
phers' statements and from his disciples' allusions it appears that he developed and gave
greater depth to ideas already elaborated by a great master, at whose school he had his
training: gZon nu blo gros (Kumaramati) ofRe mda' [sic] (1349-1412), one of the greatest
men Lamaism has had between Buston and Tson k'a pa. He had been a disciple of the Na dpon
[sic!] Kun dga' dpal, he had .commented on the prajiiiiwith penetrating research, continuing a
tradition derived from the lotsava of rNog and his followers; then, after leaving his work as a
teacher to meditate in a hermitage, he had particularly studied 'Maitreya's five laws', laying
down, on the base of those texts, the principle that cosmic consciousness is the only reality,
and that, being inborn in each of us, it represents a necessary passport and the cause of that
return to the purity of 'the Buddha's essence' which is identified with nirviiI;a.
Fifty years later Jinpa (1999: 8) writes:
Tsongkhapa vehemently opposes what is known as the Shentong Madhyamaka as absolutist.
In doing so, Tsongkhapa is following in the footsteps of thinkers like Sakya Palfgita, Buton,
and Tsongkhapa's own teacher Rendawa.
The most detailed analysis with regard to Red mda' ba's position towards tathagatagarbha and
the Jo nang pa's view of Empty of other-nature (gzhan stong) has been undertaken by Stearns
(1999) in his historical survey of this view in Tibet, mainly based on Sangs rgyas rtse mo, and
Red mda' ba's writings. But some information is coming from different sources such as the
Claim that he had copies ofthe Vimalaprabhathrown into rivers. Stearns (1999: 56) states:
The best known and most influential early opponent of the J onang tradition was the Sakya
scholar Rendawa Zhonu Lodro (1348-1413). ( ... ) He became one of the most important
teachers of the great Tsongkhapa Lozang Trakpa (1357-1419), but was viewed by the Jonang
tradition as a vicious opponent of the teachings of definitive meaning (nitiirtha, nges don),
Which has been spread so successfully by Dolpopa.
26
Chapter 2
In short, Stearns (1999: 56-59) points out that there is a strong condemnation of Red mda' ba,
who opposed the doctrine of Buddha nature as the ultimate ground, denigrated the six-limbed
yoga as the ultimate path, criticized the KiiJacakramillatantra as well as the Condensed'KiiJa-
cakratantra and had copies of the VimaJaprabhiiilirown into rivers, Steams acknowledges that
there was a considerable degree of hysteria surrounding this matter, and that Red mda' ba's
main quarrel was not with the content of the Kalacakratantra itself, but with the prevalent prac-
tice of taking its meaning to be literal (sgraji bzhinpa)
Rendawa was indeed the most famous (or infamous) critic of the Kalacakra tradition in Tibet
But he had first studied with some of Dolpopa's greatest disciples, such as Nyaon Kunga Bal
and Mati Panchen'9, and had been extremely impressed with the Jonang philosophical system,
Seyfort Ruegg (1963: 75) points out that "only a few authorities, notably Red mda' ba (1349-
1412), actually opposed the Ka1acakra and the Sa<;langayoga (".) for introducing into the well
authenticated and in themselves complete methods ofthe great Buddhist masters extraneous and
not easily verifiable notions and terms,"
Red mda' ba's attitude towards the Kalacakra will be explored in chapter 6, section 2,6.3,1,
How can he be the most important critic of the Jo nang system, after he had been extremely
impressed with the Jo nang philosophical system? According to his biography, Red mda' ba first
wanted to establish this tenet system ofthe Jo nang pa in a deeply rooted way, but changed his
mind after investigating the respective scriptures three times (see chapter 6, section 2,6.1).
Steams (1999: 58) states:
In short, [Rendawa] does seem to have led a strong reactionary movement against the Jonang
philosophical system less than fifteen years after the death of Dolpopa. Nevertheless, it now
seems clear that Rendawa's attitude was considerably more ambivalent than the latter
historical sources would have us believe.
Indeed, mNga' ris pa Sangs rgyas rtse mo stresses in his biography on Red mda' ba, that he did
not categorically criticize theKalacakratantra, This agrees with Jinpa (2009: 319), who analyzes
the key qualms raised by Red mda' ba about Kalacakra, while noting at the same time that the
examination of the specifics of his qualms deserves a careful separate study. One of Red mda'
ba's central premises is that any system of thought or practice at odds with the four classical
Buddhist philosophical schools must lie outside the bounds of Buddhist thought, and that he
does not see the Kiilacakra to be acceptable, Jinpa (2009: 319-22) lists Red mda' ba's key
objections following sTag tshang Lo tsa ba (b. 1405) and points out that Red mda' ba "also
raises an interesting historical question pertaining to the tantra when he refers to a statement in
PUQ.<;larika's Stainless Lightthat the root tantra was composed in different languages in different
places, including in Tibetan in Tibet!"
He also asserts that the essential points of the six-limbed yoga of the Kalacakra completion
stage are in conflict with the Guhyasamaja. Comparing Kalacakra to the more established
tanh'as, such as Guhyasamaja, Hevajra, and CakrasaI)lVara, Rendawa asserts that these tantras
were brought to the world by great Mahasiddhas like Saraha, expounded by Nagarjuna and his
State of Research
sons, and produced masters who attained freedom on the basis of practicing their essential
points (Jinpa 2009: 321-22).
27
Jinpa (2009: 324) assumes that by the time Red mda' ba changed his views on this important
tantra and even does not rule out the possibilitiy ofTsong kha pa's being an important influence,
who never doubted the authenticity of Kiilacakra. Whether Red mda' ba's criticism at the
KRlacakra had an influence on the dGe lug pa's mininrizing Tsong kha pa's reliance on Red
mda' ba is difficult to judge at this stage of research. Jinpa (2009: 325-26) concludes:
Regardless of which standpoint Rendawa finally upheld with respect to Kalacakra, the probing
questions he raised appear to have enduring mark, at least in the way in which this important
Buddhist tantra has been expounded by Tsongkhapa. These questions not only helped to draw
'attention to the features that are unique to this system, but, and perhaps more importantly, they
have caused the Tibetans to appreciate more clearly the essential similarity of this tantra to other
well-known tantras of the highest yoga class.
However, Steams (1999: 65) is probably correct in arguing that due to the great influence ofthe
dGe lugs sect, also many mainstream Sa skya scholars distanced themselves from the Jo nang
school. According to him, many had been influenced by the "unique views" of Tsong kha pa.
This may have happened in large part because many Sa skya scholars following the time of
Rendawa had rejected the theories of Dolpopa, and perhaps gone to the other extreme had
allied themselves with the new Geluk school, founded by Rendawa's disciple Lord
Tsongkhapa, whose views were very questionable in light of the ancient teachings of the
original Sakya masters.
Go rarns pa's Distinguishing the VJ'ews (iTa ba 'j shan 'byed), which is ostensibly written as an
attack on the Madhyamaka views of Dol po pa
60
and Tsong kha pa, is one of the few works
known to us so far in which Red mda' ba is also criticized. This text by Go rams pa has been
edited and made available in an English translation in Cabez6n and Dargyay (2007). In the
introduction on p. 30 Cabez6n says:
Go rams pa mentions some of the critics of Dol po pa in Distinguishing the Views, among
them his own teacher, Rong ston Shes bya kun rig (1367-1450), and another great master of
the Sa skya school, Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros (1349-1412), who was also a teacher of
Tsong kha pa. And of course it is well-known that Tsong kha pa himself criticized the views
of Dol po pa in such works as The Essence of Eloquent Discourse (Legs bshad snying po).
Furthermore Cabez6n (2007: 47) remarks that Go rams pa employs arguments such as those
found used by Tsong kha pa against Dol po pa, arguments that Tsong kha pa may, in tum, have
borrowed from one of his Sa skya teachers, Red mda' ba. However, as Steams (1999: 59)
assesses, without a more careful study of Red mda' ba's works, it is very difficult to reach a
fmal conclusion as to his stand towards the view of Empty of other-nature (gzhan stong) in the
context of the Kiilacakra. It is noticeable that Kano (2006: 212-13) states in his analysis of
rNgog lo's impact on doctrinal developments from the 11 th through 14th centuries, alluding to
the Empty of other-nature Madhyarnaka doctrinal area:
28
Chapter 2
In a brief summary of the positions ofDol-po-pa and Bu-ston, Shakya-mchog-Idan summar-
izes Bu-ston's position as follows: Bu-ston's system of the Buddha nature is similar to Sa-pal),
and Bu-ston takes the Buddha nature as being of implicative meaning and judges a statement
in the Mahlfparinirviil}asiltra (which taught that the resultant Buddha nature actually abides' in
all sentient beings) to be not literal, for the RGV [i.e., Ratnagotravibhlfga] does not equate the
causal stained tathatlf with the resultant bodhi itself Furthermore, Shakya-mchog-ldan says
that Bu-ston explained the definitive meaning of tantric works in accordance with the gzhan
stong.
In note 139 Kano adds: "In another work, Shiikya-mchog-ldan says that Red-mda' -ba accorded
with Bu-ston's mDzes rgyan. See Shilkya-mchog-ldan, Mus rab byams pa 'i dds Ian, vol. 23,
407.1-2."61 Seyfort Ruegg (2000: 63, 64), referring to Deb ther sngon po and mKhas grub's
rGyud sde spyi mam points out that Red mda' ba is reported to have connected the
Ratnagotravibhaga with the Cittamatra system, though it is implied that he may have later
changed his opinion.
While this is not the main aim ofthe present study, we will examine some debates related to
the topic that are found in the biography, as well as some related texts, particularly Red mda'
ba's Letter to the [Great} Teacher (i.e., to the Buddha), which seems to have greatly upset Red
mda' ba's own teacher Nya dbon Kun dga' dpal (see Appendix B and chapter 6, section 2.6).
His Role within the Synthesis of the rNgog pa and Sa skya pa Scholastic
Lineages
Red mda' ba's role within the rNgog and Sa skya tradition is quite blurred, perhaps partly also
because the relationship between the two great learning centers Sa skya and gSang phu has not
yet been clarified. It seems that at the time of Red mda' ba there were Sa skya colleges within
the bKa' gdams monastery gSang phu.
62
To understand this development, we have to go back to
the year 1073. Kramer (1997: 1) notes in the introduction to his translation of the biography of
rNgog BIo 1dan shes rab (1059-1109) that in the same year 1073, when gSang phu was founded
in dBUS
63
by rNgog Legs pa'i shes rab, one of the main disciples of Atisa, Khon dKon mchog
rgyal po (1034-1102), founded Sa skya in gTsang. Jackson (1987: 155n52) points out:
gSang-phu ( ... ) was established by the famous bKa-gdams-pa master rNgog Legs-pa'i-shes-rab
(fl. early to late 11th century), whose nephew and successor on the abbot's chair, rNgog lo-tsii-
ba Blo-1dan-shes-rab (1059-1109, hereafter rNgog-lo), played a leading role in the transmis-
sion of some branches ofIndian Buddhist thought to Tibet.
Also Dreyfus (1997: 22) stresses that rNgog 10, despite belonging to the bKa' gdams school of
Atisa (982-1054) and 'Brom ston pa rGyal ba'i byung gnas (1005-1064), was deeply interested
in scholarly studies. Under his influence, Tibetan Buddhism became more philosophically
oriented. The rNgog tradition centered around the bKa' gdams monastery64 of gSang phu Ne'u
thog
65
, located about 25-30 km south or south-west of lHasa. It was the first seminary for dia-
lectics and other studies of the doctrine.
66
State of Research
29
But Red mda' ba's home monastery was not gSang phu. He belonged to Sa skya, located more
than 400 Ian westwards in gTsang. The question is whether the rNgog tradition had any impact
on the philosophical studies in Sa skya at Red mda' ba's time, and what kind of relationship the
two large centers oflearning had in the second half of the 14th century .
. Red mda' ba's Tshad ma Studies in Sa skya
As will be analyzed in detail (see chapter 6, section 2.5.4), Red mda' ba studied the PramiilJa-
with Nya dbon Kun dga' dpal, the greatest Tibetan scholar in this field, and another
great expert, mKhan chen Sangs rgyas 'phel. But when in Sa skya, he got stuck and failed in a
debate, started doubting about the teachings received from his teachers, and went into retreat,
making intensive self studies on Dharmaklrti's seven treatises on valid cognition supported by
commentaries in the tradition of Sa skya P3I.l9ita Kun dga' rgyal mtshan (1182-1251) and 'u
yug pa Rigs pa'i seng ge (d. 1253). Due to the previous teachings and these studies he attained
a deep understanding ofPrarniiI;.a and composed his own two commentaries.
Wayman (1999: 255) points out that Tsong kha pa mentions at the end of his Mun sel (a
guided tour through the books ofDharmaklrti) that it was exhorted by some notable of his day,
named Grags pa'i rgyal mtshan, but inside the text there is a passage naming Red mda' ba as the
source (cf. 1999: 294). Dreyfus (1997: 469n44) ascertains that rGyal tshab acknowledges his
debt to Red mda' ba, whose many teachings on Sa P3I.l'S Treasure have enabled him to write his
.. book, in the colophon of his Essence of Good Sayings, an Explanadon of [Sa palJ 'sJ Treasure on
Science of Valid Cognition.
Van der Kuijp (1994a: 5) states:
The earliest Tibetan scholar of the so-called later propagation of Buddhism in Central Tibet
known to have composed a good number of works on tshad ma is Rngog Lo tsa ba. In fact his
oeuvre may be said to have initiated in Tibet the so-called later phase of pre-classical tshad
ma.
Furthermore van der Kuijp (1987: 104) shows that up to the first half of the 13th century, the
best-known scholars of gSang phu monastery interacted in controversial and non-controversial
;.vays with their counterparts at the monastery of Sa skya:
Until Sa-skya PaQ.dita's days, it was only Gsang phu ne'u thog which had the sole reputation
of being a veritable fortress of the type of textual gzhung learning that belongs to the siltra-
class, in contrast to most of the other central Tibetan monastic establishments where the
importance of siltra-class studies was largely overshadowed by tantric study and practice.
Sakya mChog ldan later said that two systems oflearning appeared in the scholarship based on
authoritative texts (lung) and reasoning (rigs pa), known as the Sa skya pa and rNgog positions
(van der Kuijp 1983: 1). In 12th century gSang phumasters such as Phywa pa Chos kyi seng ge
(1109-1169), who was an expert in the fields ofPramfu].a and Madhyamaka, strictly followed as
aMadhyamika the Svatantrika tradition ofrNgog 10 tsa ba BIo ldan shes rab (1059-1109).
Phywa pa was a disciple of Gro lung pa BIo gros 'byung gnas, the chief disciple of rNgog 10,
30
Chapter 2
and ofrGya dmar pa Byang chub grags pa (Tauscher 1999: vii-xii). Sa chen Kun dga' snying po
(1092-1158), the fIrst of the fIve forefathers of the Sa skya tradition, and his successor bSod
nams rtse mo (1142-1182) studied many years under masters of gSang phu Ne'u thog (Jackson
1985: 20, 22; 1987: 24, 105-06). Phywa pa is known to have written refutations of the works of
Candrakrrti.67.
We need to understand, whether scholars of Sa skya monastery, to which Red mda' ba
belonged, continued to study and teach rNgog 10 's epistemological (tshad ma)tradition after the
time of Sa skyaPal).<,lita or whether they adhered only to the view of the latter. It is also possible
that in Sa skya various scholars took different views and co-existed, at least in the fIeld of
Buddhist epistemology. Jackson (l994a: 382-83) points out:
Much of Sa skya Pal).c.iita's epistemological writings, for instance, should be understood not
only in relation to Indian tradition, but also as a continuation of or a divergence from the
school founded by rNgog-lo and further developed by Phywa-pa. But for now it is enough to
notice in this biography [ofrNgog 10] signs of a significant new dialectical orientation at the
new beginning of Tibetan Buddhist scholasticism. From rNgog-lo's time onwards, and proba-
bly as one of his special legacies, Tshad-ma studies have come to occupy a very central
position.
Quoting Sakya mchog Idan, Jackson (1987: 134) includes Red mda' ba among the upholders of
Dharmaklrti's PramiiI;zaviirttika lineage. He also lists seminaries in dEus and gTsang where the
PramiiI;zaviirttika was studied according to the Sa skya tradition, and states that the Summaries
(bsDus pa)were maintained in accordance with the Treasure of Reasoning (Rigs gterj.
When Siikya mchog Idan was writing this account in 1495, some seven notable seminaries
were still at least nominal adherents of Pramfu)a traditions of the old school of rNgog and
Phywa pa, though the actual teaching lineages of the PVin [i.e., Pramiil}aviniscaya] and Bsdus
pa were then on the verge of dying out (Jackson 1987: 135),
Jackson also names monasteries in which Tsong kha pa and his disciples studied, among them
gSang phu monastery, and adds: "Any exposition of the PV [i.e., PramiiJ;1aviirttika] in these
seminaries must have originated from Sa-pal).'s lineage."
According to Dreyfus (1997: 26) many important Sa skya thinkers such as Nya dbon and Red
mda' ba are to be included in the list of epistemological thinkers attempting to reconcile the
rising Treasure of Reasoning of Sa pal). with the accepted views ofPhywa pa's tradition.
Therefore, at the end of the fourteenth and the beginning of the fifteenth centuries, a conflict
of interpretation opposed the partisans of Tibetan realism to those who followed Sa pal).' s
antirealism. Siikya Chok-den alluded to this situation when he complained about authors who,
although claiming to uphold the tradition of the Treasure, nevertheless made it the target of
their indirect criticism.
The terms "realism" and "antirealism" here refer to the two basic trends in Tibetan Buddhist
epistemology initiated by rNgog 10 and Sa pal)., which Sakya mchog Idan has referred to as the
rNgog tradition (rNgog lugs) and the Sa skya tradition (Sa lugs) (cf. van der Kuijp 1983: 5),
State of Research
31
both part of the period of "New epistemo10gy"68 in Tibet that mainly developed during the late
propagation (phyi dar), while the major. cornn:entaries to the works ofDignaga (480-540) and
Dhannaklrti (600-660) were translated mto TIbetan.
Dreyfus (1997: 21-27), emphasizing the work of Tibetan thinkers in the "classical period of
Tibetan Buddhism," i.e., between the end ofthefourteenth and the end of the fifteenth centuries,
this development in summary as follows: Sa Pal!, studying with the Indian pai)J,lit Siik:ya
Sribhadra, discovered that rNgog 10 and Phywa pa misinterpreted Dharmaklrti and composed
his masterpiece Treasure of Reasoning, which only received attention with g.Yag ston. g.Yag
ston criticized those, who followed Phywa pa's Summades, which supported a "realism re-
garding universals and commonsense objects" that corresponds neither to Dharmaklrti's ideas
nor to Sa Pal!'S explanations. A conflict of interpretations arose. The main critic of Sa Pal! was
Bo dong Phyogs las mam rgyal (1376-1451), who "followed the Zeitgeist in his attempt to es-
,tablish a synthesis between Sa-pal). and the realist interpretations dominant in his time," follow-
ingalsoRig pa'i ral gri (1250-1330). Others like Tsong kha pa, rGyal tshab rje andmKhas grub
rje did not agree with Sa Pal!' s interpretation that contradicts with the more realist interpretation
ofDharmaklrti. Thus they "interpreted" Sa Pal!'S views and tried to make them compatible with
'fuose ofPhywa pa. Thus Sa Pal! was made out a forerunner of Tsong kha pa, although their
:views on epistemology were quite different. Dreyfus (1997: 22-23) thinks that before introdu-
.$ing the dGe lugs tradition, the Sa skya tradition had been the great rival of the Sang phu tradi-
irian ofrNgog 10 and Phywa pa, and that Sa skya became a major scholarly tradition only during
the thirteenth century under Sa Pal!, who brought together monastic and tantric aspects. How-
as Dreyfus (1997: 30-32) stresses, Tsong kha pahad only a limited role in the elaboration
?f adGe lugs logico-epistemological tradition. There are two currents of exegesis in the dGe
epistemology tradition, usually associated willi rGyal tshab and mKhas grub, who, as the
present study will show, both studied Pramiil).a with Red mda' ba (see chapter 6, sections 2.5.4
rGyal tshab takes a more orthodox way of interpreting, closely connected to Phywa
,pa, while mKhas grub (similar to rGyal tshab's commentary on Sa pal). treasure, based on Red
ba) refutes several concepts introduced by Phywa pa (Dreyfus 1997: 32). Important seems
to be in this context the above mentioned remark that many important Sa skya thinkers such as
Nya dbon and Red mda' ba tried to reconcile Sa Pal!'S Treasure of Reasoning with the views of
Phywa pa. This needs further analysis by studying Red mda' ba's works. Dreyfus (1997: 441)
klsostates that dGe lugs thinkers and especially rGyal tshab strongly emphasized the religious
,*spect of Buddhist epistemology, and adds in note 46:
Although the significance of this [sotetiological] interpretation [of Buddhist epistemology] is
quite clear, its otigin is less obvious. Steinkellner speculates that the initiator of this religious
interpretation might have been Dzong-ka-ba's teacher, Ren-da-wa (E. Steinkellner, "Tshad
ma 'j skyes bu.') Van der Kuijp rejects this idea as lacking evidence. He finds it extraordinary
that Ren-da-wa would not be mentioned by Gyel-tsap or Kay_drup69.
Although it seems to be correct that Red mda' ba emphasized the study of Sa pal).'s text in
with 'u yug pa Rigs pa'i seng ge's commentary, I have found no evidence so far
tshab was trained in gSang phu monastery as Dreyfus (1997: 32, 34) claims.
32 Chapter 2
Red mda' ba 's Phar phyin Studies
From Sangs rgyas rtse mo's biography of Red mda' ba it becomes clear that he studied the
perfections (phar phyin) or Prajfiapiiramita, with the glorious Bla rna dam pa bSod nams rgyal
mtshan according to commentaries of 'Bre Shes rab 'bar and his disciple AI Byang chub ye
shes, both masters in the transmission lineage of the rNgog tradition (rNgog lugs) ofthe Prajnii-
piiramitii (see chapter 6, section 2.5.5). In his preface to the facsimile reproduction of the Rang
ston Phar phyin, Jackson (1988: I-II) explains the relationship and doctrinal competition
between the tradition of Red mda' ba and Tsong kha pa on the one hand and Rong ston on the
other. With regard to Rong ston, one ofthe early critics of Tsong kha pa, Jackson notes:
The importance of Rong-ston in the history of Tibetan scholasticism can hardly be over-
estimated. This goes without saying of the Sa-skya-pa tradition, where his students and their
pupils completely dominate later developments. But for the scholastic (mtshan nyid) traditions
of the Bka' -brgyud-pa and Rnying-ma too he is a very important figure because many if not
most of their scholastic lineages pass through him. Indeed even some of the great scholars
within the early-15th-century movement that under the inspiration of Tsong-kha-pa was
developing into the Dga' -Idan-pa (or Dge-Iugs-pa) school had also received some training
under Rong-ston during the years he was actively teaching at Gsang-phu. These included six
abbots of Ri-bo Dga'-ldan and 'Bras-spungs.
70
The later Dge-lugs-pa tradition stemming as it
does from Tsong-kha-pa Blo-bzang-grags-pa (l357-1419) and Red-mda'-ba Gzhon-nu-blo-
gros (1349-1412), represents a continuation of a different synthesis of the Rngog-pa and Sa-
skya-pa scholastic lineages, and it generally does not preserve glad memolies of Rong-ston.
Not only did Rong-ston and his teacher G.yag-ston represent the main alternative tradition
which could vie with it for authority, but also Rong-ston was the first great scholar openly to
question and criticize what he took to be novel doctrinal and philosophical interpretations on
the part of his older contemporary Tsong-kha-pa.
It is also important to note that the Blue Annals (Roerich 1949: 340) states that the original col-
lege of g.Yag ston, although he was a Sa skya scholar, was gSang phu Ne'u thog, not Sa skya,
and also that his spiritual son Rong ston s=a ba'i seng ge, came in his youth from rGyal mo
rong
7
! (Tsha rong) to study in gSang phu monastery. According to David Jackson72 both went
later and taught extensively at Sa skya during visits there. However, there is no evidence that
g.Yag ston, Red mda' ba's competitor, was in Sa skya at the time when from there a great
deferral of Red mda' ba's teachings and a revolt by his retinues in Bul rong occurred (ca. 1390).
This incident was soon followed by Red mda' ba's resignation from his teaching position in Sa
skya and his twelve-year-retreat in Bul rong (see chapter 6, sections 2.9.2.6 and 2.10.1). It is
important to note that Jackson (1989: 6) states:
In the general Mahayana scholasticism of Tibet in those days [i.e., the early fifteenth century],
Rong-ston together with g.Y ag-ston represented the main doctrinal alternative to the tradition
of Tsong-kha-pa (1357-1419) and his teacher Red-mda' -ba (1349-1412), though both pairs of
savants were basically offshoots from a common trunk ofthe gSang-phulSa-skya scholarly and
intellectual tradition. (He may also have influenced the thought of certain early dGa' -ldan-pas,
State of Research
for many masters who later became influential students ofTsong kha pa had also studied under
Rong-ston at some stage of their career.) In the later Sa-skya-pa dialectic or scholastic tradi-
tions, his influence predominated almost completely. Nearly all such traditions surviving in the
Sa-skya-pa pass down through.him.
33
This shoWS that a comparative study of the works byRedmda' ba, Tsong kha pa, and Rong ston
would be extremely helpful. Unfortunately Red mda' ba' sPhar phyin commentary (see chapter
. 7, text no. 4) is still missing, but since it is listed in Orags pa (1985) as well as in a list from
Mongolia, there is some hope that sooner or later it will come to light again. For an adequate
understanding of the intellectual developments of ftlls period more information about the
relationship between Sa skya, gSang phu and the early dOe lugs pa monasteries is desirable too.
The Scholastic System of Teaching and Learning
.Dreyfus (2003: 144) indicates that the gradual institutionalization of scholastic learning can also
be traced in the development of monastic degrees. One of the many peculiarities ofSangs rgyas
rtse mo's biography is that it lists the very many disciples of Red mda' ba (see chapter 6,
sections 2.7.1 to 2.7.8) according to their scholastic degrees. Analyzing these sections, and .
considering that Red mda' ba, while teaching in Sa skya, had been asked by his students to
establish a scriptural tradition through monastic textbooks (yig cha) on Madhyamaka, it will be
shown that Red mda' ba introduced the fifth course of study of the so-called 'Five Scriptures'
. (bKa' pod lnga) studies of the scholastic tradition, which continues in the dOe lugs tradition in
their dEu rna studies, as well as the curriculum ofa 'Master of the Ten Scriptures' (bKa' bcu
pa). The previous studies of dEu rna topics in Tibet consisted of study of the Svatantrika
Madhyamaka view only, set within the framework of the Phar phyin studies. While Red mda'
ba's main disciple rOyal tshab, successor of Tsong kha pa, achieved the academic title of a
Master of the Ten Scriptures, Tsong kha pa, probably similar to Red mda' ba himself, obtained
only the title ofa 'Master of the Four Scriptures' (bKa' bzhi pa). We do not know much about
the early education system in Tibet, especially about the curriculum in Sa skya, from the
thirteenth century onwards, when under Sa pat}. it had developed a major scholarly tradition. For
gSang phu Ne'u thog we have some information. Van der Kuijp (1987:104) points out that
anyone wishing to study the basic philosophical texts of Buddhism, including of course
Dharmaklrti's PramiiJ;aviniscaya, during the twelfth and the beginning of the thirteenth centu-
ries, had to go to Gsang-phu ne'u thog for such training.
Jackson (1988, I) makes clear that in the early time in gSang phu Ne'u thog a unit of three
subjects was studied:
Since the time of Rngog lo-tsa-ba Blo-Idan-shes-rab (1059-1109), the Prajiiaparamita philoso-
phy expounded in the AbhisamaylBIpkiira and its main commentaries such as Haribhadra's
had been a fundamental topic for Tibetan scholars of Mahayana philosophy. Its study, together
with the study of elementary dialectics (bsdus grwa) and Buddhist logic-epistemology (Prama-
I).a, especially Dharmaklrti's PramiiJ;aviniscaya), was considered in the tradition of Rngog's
seminary Gsang-phu Ne'u-thog to be one of the three prerequisite subjects for Buddhist
34
Chapter 2
scholarship - this triad being sometimes referred to as phar tshad bsdus gsum
73
The funda-
mental importance of these subjects remains more or less unchanged today in the main
surviving offshoot of that tradition - i. e. modern Dge-lugs-pa scholasticism.
Furthermore van der Kuijp (1987: 111) describes in the curriculum at the time ofPhywa pa, the
sixth abbot of gSang phu Ne'u thog, a configuration of four teachers, who taught in four
teaching quarters the following topics: 1. Phywa pa taught on the eastern side of the rNgog 10 tsii
ba's mausoleum logic and epistemology, 2. rGya mching ru ba on the southern side the Maitre-
ya[natha] texts, 3. Rin chen tshul khrims on the western side Abhidharma, and 4. Yon tan shes
rab on the northern side Vinaya. As my present study shows, what is nowadays in the dGe lugs
pa studies referred to as dBu rna studies, based on the Madhyamakavatfira was established by
Red mda' ba in Sa skya. Other teachers like g.Yag ston followed his example.
Jackson (2007: 348) points out that it was Red mda' ba's main contribution to revive Mad-
hyamaka studies and raise them to new prominence, but Madhyamaka was not counted as one
of the core subjects of gSang phu Ne'u thog and its branches before Rong ston Shes byakun rig
(1367-1449), and that the basic curriculum often scriptures under Red mda' ba may be hinted
at in a verse by Red mda' ba quoted by A khu Shes rab rgya mtsho.
Details on Red mda' ba's Abhidharma and Vinaya studies and his lineages are given too (see
chapter 6, sections 2.5.6, 2.5.7). How studies ofPharphyin (including Svatantrika Madhyamaka
studies), Tshad rna and dBu rna can intertwine becomes clear, when studying Cabez6n (2003:
296-98). He describes, why Tsong kha pa dedicates so much energy to elaborating the
Svatantrika-Prasangika distinction. He positions Red mda' ba possibly close to J ayananda, while
Tsong kha pa and Red mda' ba are said to have had quite different theories of the Madhyamaka,
although both agree that CandraJdrti' s Priisangika is the only correct interpretation ofNagarjuna.
From the viewpoint of Tshad rna Dreyfus (1997: 5) states that most Sa skya and dGe lugs
thinkers describe themselves as Madhyamika.Although Dharmaklrti is considered as Y ogacarin
they use his thought in the domains of logic, epistemology, and philosophy of language. They
do so because, in a tradition in which philosophy is commentarial, a philosophical point canoot
be made without being properly grounded in a previous tradition. In the logico-epistemological
domain, Dharrnaklrti provides this authoritative grounding.
Such an approach of combining Tshad rna and dBu rna seems to find its parallels in the Indian
tradition. As Dreyfus (1997: 19) points out, already Bhavya (500-70) reconsidered Madhyamaka
doctrine in the light of Dignaga's logical system.
Jnanagarbha (700-760) offers the example of a Madhyamika who has adopted many of the key
Dharrnaklrtian epistemological concepts we examine here. His works mark a strong shift
toward epistemology within the Madhyamaka tradition. c. .. ) Not all Madhyamikas, however,
agreed on this use of Buddhist logic and epistemology. Candraklrti (540-600) in particular saw
this use of Dignaga's system ( ... ) as contradicting the Madhyamaka rejection of essentialism.
So the question arises which stance Red mda' ba took as Prasangika towards the use of the
thoughts ofDignaga and DharmakIrti. Cabez6n (2003: 297) explains that svatantras need to be
State of Research
35
rejected by Madhyamikas, because their positing requires not only the acceptance of theses, but
also, their epistemological grounding in valid cognition: "This or a version of it, would seem to
be the position ofJayananda, and possibly that of Red mda' ba." This needs further investi-
gation.
74
Historical Sources on Red mda' ba's Life
'From the viewpoint of historiography, the present work tries to base itself, as much as possible,
'6rl. primary sources, or in other words, original sources. But there are also secondary sources,
re., later Tibetan histories that repeat the original sources, which will also be considered.
iithough Red mda' ba was one of the key figures in the history of Tibetan Buddhist scholasti-
E1sm, extensive accounts of his life or mentions of his accomplishments are found in few places
Tibetan literature. Thus it may be worthwhile to list here the main sources on his life.
mus list contains all biographies of Red mda' ba known so far, but it does not claim to be ex-

Biograpbies of Red mda' ba

1.iTimary Sources
;k}ir,' "
IThree biographies of Red mda' ba are known, though only two are now extant. Of these two,
is listed in at least two traditional Tibetan lists of biographies: One such list was compiled
1'fu 1865 by dKon mchog bstan pa rab rgyas (b. 18.0 1) and is to be found in the history mDo smad
;rehos 'byung(1977: 26). He enumerates two biographies ofRedmda' ba: one bymNga' ris pa
rtse mo and another by 'Du1 'dzin Grags pa rgyal mtshan?6 The first citation is partly
The author's name is not mNga' ris pa bSod nams rtse mo, but mNga' ris pa Sangs
rtgyas rtse mo (see chapter 6, sections 1.8 verse 36 and 2.26 verse 36).
In the second traditional list, the List of Some Rare Tibetan Books Transmitted (dPe rgyun
t?kon pa 'ga shig gi tho yigp by the famous A khu Shes rab rgya mtsho, we find only one entry,
!J1'kely in the section 'Histories (chos-/;1bymi), biographies (roam-thar},jiitakas, etc.:' "10957
:.>'"
tIRed mda' pa 'i roam thar mnga ' ris pa bsod nams rtse mos mdzad pa." Just as his contemporary
mchog bstan pa rab rgyas, so too A khu Rin po che wrongly names mNga' ris pa bSod
rtse mo as the author. The three biographies of Red mda' ba known to us, are as follows:

,8,angs rgyas rtse mo
,
mNga' ris pa(b. 14thcent.). dPaiidanredmda' ba chenpo'iroam tharngo
rmtshar lII1ad byung. There are two manuscripts (A and B), of which TBRC holds digitally
microfilm images, tiffs and pdf files, and a computer-input offset print of manuscript A.
Manuscript [A], 39 fols., TBRC code W1CZ1885, discovered in Beijing: Nationalities Library
Cultural Palace of Nationalities.
[B], 43 fols., TBRC code W18649.
';2003. Sa skya rgyal yongs gsung rab slob gnyer khang (IBA), ed. Sa skya pa 'i bia ma kha shas
'kyi roam thar (Biographies of Some Sa-skya-pa Masters), pp. 265-352. Part of a collection of
38
Chapter 3
ten biographies. A copy of the template used for printing has been received from IBA. !tis just
another negative microfilm copy of manuscript A, and thus not really significant as a "textual
witness." In the text edition I will only occasionally refer to it in the critical apparatus.
78

This main source for the present study, of which we have two manuscripts, will be discussed
in detail in the next chapter. The work was created by an authoritative source with a good
knowledge of the events being described, even being an eyewitness to some of them. The source
is therefore close to the origin of the information under study, and can thus provide us with
valuable information about Red mda' ba. The work seems to have been written or collected soon
after his death. It contains original research andhad been forgotten or lost for a long time. Thus
this work is the oldest extant source of information on the life ofRedmda' ba to which we now
have access. It may therefore allow us to draw new historical conclusions to outstanding
questions surrounding the development of Tibetan Buddhism in the time period in question. It
speaks for itself in ways that cannot be captured through the filter oflater Tibetan histories and
deserves our full attention.
The source is a hagiography, a geme which has also come to be referred to pejoratively by
critics, who hold them to be uncritical and devotional in style and content. But as we shall see,
this present source contains not only traditional hagiographical elements, but also purely bio-
graphical information, whose historical value is enhanced by the fact that it covers an entire life-
time. This can be clarified by consulting other contemporaneous historical documents that also
refer to the events described in the biography, such as letters, other writings, and their colo-
phons, and parallel sources such as biographies of the main figures' contemporaries. Because
this present work does not belong entirely either to the category of fiction or to that of straight
history, it can be used selectively for the purposes of both, religious and historical inquiry.
'Dul ' dzin Grags pa rgyal mtshan
The biography mentioned in the mDo smad Chos 'byunglist, composed by 'Dul ' dzin Grags pa
rgyal mtshan (l374-1434?9, the direct disciple of Tsong kha pa, would b ~ indeed of great
interest too, but unfortunately it is still lost. Despite all efforts it could not be located thus far,
neither in international manuscript catalogs nor in the main libraries of Tibetans in exile nor in
Tibet itself. In Tibet searches have been undertaken in Derge as well as in several other places
which for understandable reasons will not be mentioned here. In Indian exile an inquiry to the
Office of H.H. the Dalai Lama was met with the response that it is neither in His Holiness'
private library nor in the Library of Tibetan Work and Archives. Furthermore searches have
been made in the Tibet House New Delhi, in the libraries of Sera, Drepung and Ganden, in Sa
skya monastery CBylakuppe, South India), in H.B. Sakya Trizin's private library in Dehradun
and in the Shantarakshita Library ofthe Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies in Samath-
Varanasi. Further searches in the private libraries of high-ranking dGe lugs pa lamas may lead
to success.
Historical Sources on Red mda' ba's Life
39
RatnasaI11bhava
FromKhenpo Gyats0
80
the information was received that several other biographies on Red mda'
ba are available such as the one by RatnasaI11bhava, of which I later also obtained a blockprint
and an dbu medmanuscript. It was published as a clearly legible computer-input offset print,
together with the biography composed by mNga' ris pa Sangs rgyas rtse mo.
RatnasaI11bhava. Red mda' ba gzhon nu blo gros kyi mam thar, dBu med manuscript, 17
fols., dbu can version published in: Sa skya pa 'i bla ma kha shas kyi mam thar, Tibetan-style
book (dpe cha), 1 vol., published in Kathmandu 2003 by Sakya International Buddhist Academy
(Sa skyargyal yongs gsung rab slob gnyerkhang), pp. 241-64. Place ofwriting:dPe dmar, the
. main seat (gdan sa) of sTag 10 [tsa ba]81.
RatnasaI11bhava is probably the Sanskritized form of Tibetan Rin chen 'byung ldan or Rin
chen 'byung gnas. According to the colophon, p. l7b3-5 it has been composed by "Ratna-
saI11bhava, 'who has attained little faith,82 in the Lama [Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros]." The
author carefully studied Red mda' ba's Minor Works-and then developed the wish to compose
this biography. The text does not contain many biographical datas, but concentrates more on
Buddhist practice and view. It has sixteen sections, and mainly follows the order of Sangs rgyas
rtse mo. Sometimes the author refers to different parts of Red mda' ba's writings than Sangs
rgyas rtse mo.
Despite many efforts, it has not yet been possible to determine the identity of the author.
83
l'his biography is not mentioned in the lists of rare books. A preliminary perusal of this work
points at a later date of composition and does not significantly add to our understanding of this
. important figure.
Secondary Sources
There are a number of other biographies of Red mda' ba, not the least of which are contempo-
rary short biographies, which are worthwhile to be mentioned, although they have not been fully
considered when making the critical edition ofSangs rgyas rtse mo. Occasionally they served as
source of additional information for the present work. Surely many other biographies could be
added:
Las chen
Bla ma rje btsun red mda' ba zhes snyan par grags de ni, in Las chen Kun dga' rgyal mtshan
(1432-1506), bKa' gdams kyi mam par thar pa bka' gdams chos 'byung gsaJ ba 'i sgron me zhes
bya ba (Biographies of the bKa' gdams pa [Masters). 'The Clear L i g h t ~ A History of the bKa'
gdams [School). A Detailed Account of the Spread of the bKa' gdarns school in Tibet and a
collection of more than 200 biographies ofbKa' gdams pa masters, given in the chapters 4-10.
At present we have access to three different editions of this work:
1) 1972.2 vols. New Delhi: B. Jamyang Norbu vol. 2., 630 ff.
2) 19- . Blockprint, no place, no publisher, scarmed by Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center, vol.
no. 2593, work number (W) 23748, 832 pp., 417 fols. Kaschewsky (1982: 22 no. 2) notes that
40 Chapter 3
a xerox copy is with the library of the Indo10gisches Seminar at Bonn university (formerly
Zentralasiatisches Seminar, now Abteilung Zentra1asienkunde), and the original with L.S.
Dagyab, Bonn.
3) 2003. Modem offset book print, Lhasa, Bod 1jongs mi dmangs dpe slcrun khang, 830 p., 7-
223-01568-3.
Other mentions of Las chen occur in:
Vostrikov (1970: 172-73) mentions according to edition no. 2) that the text was written in 1494 .
. Same in Martin (1997: 81, no. 148).
However in the colophon of Las chen (19-: 417a) it is said that the work was compiled 3631
years after the teaching or rather after the Nirvfu;ta of the victorious Buddha, i.e., in 1498 (see
also 1972: vol. 2, 315a.4-6; 2003: 829.21-830.3).
Kaschewsky, R. (1969). "Bericht tiber eine literarische und buddho10gische Samme1arbeit in
Nepal 1968/69" Zentraiasiatische Studien3, pp. 289 ff. '
Precise reference to the section on the biography of Red mda' ba: Las chen, chap. 9: 1972: vol.
2, 155a.4-173a.2; 19-: 309a.2-320b.5; 2003: 611.19-634.20. Note that the summary of Sangs
rgyas rtse mo ends 2003: 617.5. In that part the author mainly su=arizes the sections 2.5, 2.7,
2.9,2.10,2.13,2.14,2.17, and 2.19 of Sangs rgyas rtse mo, followed by his conclusion as to
who Red mda' ba's chief disciples were, a detailed account on various transmissions of Mental
Purification (blo sbyong), and explanations on the deity of compassion (snying rje 'j lha), i.e.,
A valokiteSvara, as well as on the being that has gained highest siddhis, dGe slong ma dPal mo
and her main followers.
84
Whether there is a direct relationship between Red
mda' ba and the dPal mo tradition (dpal molugs)is not mentioned.
At the begiuning of Las chen's biography on Red mda' ba he agrees clearly with manuscript B,
but later also summarizes part 2.17, which is missing in manuscript B.
Mangthos
mNyam med red mda 'pa chen po 'j mam thar, in Mang thos KIu sgrub rgya mtsho (1523-1596).
1993. bsTan rtsis gsal ba'j nyin byed, tha snyad rig gnas Jnga 'j byung tshU] blo gsal mgrin
rgyan. Hsi Ning (Zi ling) (province Qinghai): Bod ljongs mi dmangs dpe skrun khang (people's
Publishing House of the ART), pp. 194.10-197.14.
Date of Writing: 1564-1566. Cf. Martin (1997: 94, no. 181): finally completed in 1587 only.
Mang thos klu sgrub rgya mtsho briefly su=arizes Sangs rgyas rtse mo in a paraphrasing style.
His reading could be decided to follow six times the reading of manuscript B, three times
manuscript A, and seven times neither of the two. Therefore this text can be neglected for
drawing up the critical edition.
Ngor Chos 'byung
mKhaspag.yag gzhongnyi}S kyi lorgyusni, inNgordKonmchog lhungrub (1497-1557): A
History of Buddhism being the text of Dam pa 'j chos kyi byung tshU] legs par bshad pa bstan pa
rgya mtshor 'jug pa''j gru chen zhes bya ba rtsom 'phro kha skong bcas. Short title: Ngor Chos
Historical Sources on Red mda' ba's Life
41
'byung. Begun by Ngor chen dKon mchog 1hun grub and completed [in 1692] by Ngor chen
Sangs rgyas phun tshogs (1649-1705). Reproduced from a rare xy10graphic print from the 1705
Sde-dge blocks from the library of Bunni ok Athing. New Delhi: Ngawang Topgay 1973, 345.6-
.' 347.2 (together with the biography of g.Yag phrug Sangs rgyas dpal); states like Sangs rgyas
!hse mo that Red mda' ba passed away at the age of65, that means in his 65th year oflife, on the
29th day of the 10th month in the year of the water-dragon [1412]). .
For more details on Ngor Chos 'byung see Martin (1997: 112) no. 233 .
. y ~ shes rgyal mtshan
-iJe btsun red mda' ba gzhon nu bio gras ni, in Ye shes rgyal mtshan, Tshe mchog gling Yongs
.,dzin (1713-1793). 1990. Byang chub lam gyi dmpa'i bia ma brgyudpa'iroampar thar pa
rgyaJ bstan mdzes pa 'i rgyan mchog phul byung nor bu 'i phreng ba, pp. 891.27-905.23. With a
"preface by Blo bzang Tshe ring. Hsi Ning (Zi ling), Province Qinghai: Bod ljongs rni dmangs
dpe skrun khang (People's Publishing House of the Tibet Autonomous Region). This text has
occasionally been used for editing the biography ofSangs rgyas rtse mo. It will be described in
-more detail in chapter 4.
"\
'Shes bya 'i gter mdzod
iJTsom pa po 'i 10 rgyus nyung bsdusin Shes bya 'i gter mdzod, Beijing 1997, vol. 3 (smad cha),
316-18. Contains also a short biography of Red mda' ba in Chinese (pp. 318-19) and an index
:.6fthe so-called Red mda ' ba gzhon nu bio gros kyi gsung 'bum (pp. 311-16) which is actually
. only an index of one volume of the gSung 'bum, the Minor Works'. Accordingly, at the end of
fue biography (p. 318.6), the editors say that they are holding the composition of Red mda' ba' s
Minor WorkS'which consists of one volume in the Nationalities Library (bka' rtsomyang nged
Tni rigs dpe mdzod khang du gsung thor bu pod gcig bzhugs yod). The biography is a summary
ofSangs rgyas rtse mo. It follows almost literally the reading of manuscript A, while alternately
~ o m e words are replaced by Modern Tibetan. Only in one place does this short biography dis-
agree with manuscript A: At the beginning it starts by dating the year of birth to 1349 and thus
matches Las chen and Ye shes rgyal mtshan. But with regard to the age at death "65 [in 1412]"
and the month of death "10th month" Shes bya'igtermdzodagrees with Sangs rgyas rtse mo,
.and disagrees with Las chen and Ye shes rgyal mtshan. Note that this text agrees almost word-
for-word with Red mda' ba gzhon nu bio gros kyi roam thar mdor bsdus, in Mi nyag mGon po.
J,996. Gangs can mkhas dbang rim byon gyi roam thar mdor bsdus, bdud rtsi'i thigs phreng,
106-14.
42
Chapter 3
Modem Tibetan Secondary Literature
Biographies based on Ye shes rgyal mtshan
Red mda' ba gzhon nu blo gros ni, in T. G. Dhongthog Rinpoche: Byang phyogs thub pa 'irgyal
tshab dpalldan sa skya pa 'i bstan pa lin po che ji ltar byung ba 'i 10 rgyus rab 'byams zhing du
snyanpa'i sgra dbyangs. New Delhi: T. G. Dhongthog Rinpoche 1977: 112b3-113b5 (follows
literally Ngor Chos 'byung, but states at the end, similarly to Ye shes rgya1 mtshan and Las
chen, that Red mda' ba passed away at the age of 64 on the 29th day of the 12th month in the
water-dragon-year [1412] of the 7th 60-year-cycle. In the beginning the text agrees almost
literally with Ye shes rgyal mtshan and gives similarly the earth-ox-year [1349] as his year of
birth.
rJe btsun red mda' ba gzhon nu bio gros m; in Khetsun Sangpo, The Biographical Dictionmy of
Tibet and TIbetan Buddhism. Dharamsala: Library of Tibetan Works & Archives (1979: vol. XI,
351-67). This biography is based on Ye shes rgyal mtshan (see foreword to Khetsun Sangpo
1979: vol. XI).
Red mda' ba gzhon nu blo groB, in Ko zhul Grags pa 'byung gnas, and rGyal ba Blo bzang
mkhas grub: Gangs can mkhas grub rim byon ming mdzod Lan Chou: Kan su'u mi rigs dpe
skrun khang (Nationalities Publishing House Province Gansu) 1992, 1619.6-1620.19. States the
dates of birth and death of Red mda' ba 1349-1412 and the name of his mother dBang phyug
skyid. Thus the text agrees with Ye shes rgyal mtshan. The authors add rab byung bdun pato the
year of birth and death.
Biography based on Mang thos and Ye shes rgyal mtshan
rJe btsun Red mda' ba gzhon nu blo groB, in Don rdor, and bsTan 'dzin chos grags, ed., Gangs
ljongs 10 rgyus thog gi grags can mi sna. Hsi Ning (Zi ling) Province Qinghai: Bod Ijongs mi
dmangs dpe skrun khang (People's Publishing House of the ART) 1993: 420-2-422.12. The
author follows clearly Mang thos Klu sgrub. Only with regard to the year of birth and the age at
death does the text match Las chen or rather Ye shes rgyal mtshan.
Biography based on Khetsun Sangpo
rJe btsun red mda' pa gzllOn nu blo gros ni, in Red mda' ba gzhon nu blo gros. 1995. dBu ma la
j'ug pa 'i mam bshad de kho na nyid gsal ba 'i sgron me. Samath, Varanasi: dPal sa skya'i slob
gnyer Ihan tshogs. Sakyapa's Students' Union, Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies. Post
Graduate Teaching and Research. ka-tsa, pp. 15-31. According to Dr. Tashi Tsering, CIHTS,
who was responsible for this publication, the introductory biography on Red mda' ba is a sum-
mary of that by Khetsun Sangpo (see above). English translation in: Stiiter -Tillmann, Jiirgen and
Tsering, Tashi (1997: ix-xviii).
Introduction to the Text Edition of the Biography by Sangs rgyas
rtse mo
The Two Primary Textual Witnesses
The edited text presented here is mainly drawn from two sources (manuscripts A and B), and for
a few passages from a third related but different source, Red mda'ba' s Minor Works (M). Rea-
dings from two and in some cases from three sources are combined in a single edition. The
underlying original text is the Large Biography (rNarn thar chen rna) of Red mda' ba gZhon nu
blo gros (1348-1412) composed by mNga' ris pa Sangs rgyas rtse mo (b. 14th cent.), a disciple
of Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros. Little else is known about this author. Whatever we know
about him so far comes from this biography that he composed. At present we have access to only
two witnesses, here called manuscripts A and B, which will be described in detail below. One
manuscript is or was in the possession of the Library of the CPN in Beijing, and a copy of the
other manuscript was made available from the Tibetan Buddhist Resource Center, New York.
Now copies of both manuscripts are held by TBRC. However, it deserves mention that David
Jackson was so kind as to entrust me with a copy of manuscript A, which he himself had re-
ceived from Leonard van der Kuijp. Later, I kindly received a copy of the manuscript B and a
rare manuscript copy of Red mda' ba's Minor Works from Gene Smith.
The dates as well as the biographical details of the author are unknown. We can only say that
most likely the biography was composed shortly after the death of Red mda' ba, which took
place in 1412. Both from the fact that his passing away is described in great detail at the end of
the biography and from the way in which the verses oflamentation testify to the grief that Sangs
rgyas rtse mo felt, we can speculate that it may have been composed in 1412/13. As we can see
from the biography and the colophon, Sangs rgyas rtse mo not only met Red mda' ba, but fre-
quently mentions having been an eyewitness to certain events, at least from ca. 1401 onwards.
On ten separate occasions, he writes: "I heard," "I requested," "I went to Drung pa and asked
him," "When I told him," and soon. In the colophon he says that although what he reports
comes directly from his teacher, Red mda' ba did not intentionally tell it to him as his biogra-
pher, and that furthermore he could not check details later with anyone who was familiar with
Red mda' ba's life based on having attended him regularly as a personal servant. Sangs rgyas
rtse mo does not specify why he was unable to ask anybody, although we may assume that it was
because he wrote the biography in a hermitage in the mountainous region ofMang yul Gung
thang in mNga' ris smad. The author was clearly a direct disciple of Red mda' ba, and most
probably one of his senior disciples. Therefore the biography must have been composed within
his life span and thus not later than 1450. In any case, we can say with certainty that the text was
known at the end of the 15th century, because Las chen Kun dga' rgyal mtshan (1432-1506)86
44 Chapter 4
summarizes mNga' ris pa sangs rgyas rtse mos mdzad pa 'i red mda' ba gzhon nu blo gros kyi
rnam thaI' ngo mtshar rmad byung (Sangs rgyas rtse mo) in his bKa' gdams chos 'byung gsal
ba 'i sgron me, which he fmished writing in the year 1498. This is the earliest text we have so far
that refers to Sangs rgyas rtse mo. Also Mang thos Klu sgrub rgya mtsho (1523-1596)87
summarizes it
88
in his bsTan rtsis gsal ba'i nyin byed (1993: 194.10-197.14)89, completed in
1587. Furthermore it is also summarized in the Ngor Chos 'byung, begun by Ngor dKon mchog
lhun grub (1497-1557) and completed in 1692 by Ngor chen Sangs rgyas phun tshogs (1649-
1705).
About the history of the text we know no more than stated here. Sangs rgyas rtse mo drew not
only on information he had observed directly as an eyewitness, but he also gathered further
details from interviews with others or learnt from Red mda' ba's writings, not least of all Red
mda' ba's short autobiography which is to be found in his Minor Works (M).
According to Ven. Lobsang Dorjee, CmTS (Sarnath), wordings such as Ye shes rgyal mtshan
894.7 "nyid kyi zhal nas" imply that the author of the biography is quoting from Red mda' ba's
rang rnam (autobiography). But in Ku se A pad, et. al. 1987. Sa skya pa 'i dkar chag, no. 13, p.
41, red' da' ba rang gis rnam thar zhal gsungs las, followed by the famous verse in which Red
mda' ba's main writings are summarized, "rang gis rnam thar" refers not to Red mda' ba's
autobiography but to Sangs rgyas rtse mo. Thus further analysis shows that rang rnam can also
just mean "his own biography." Also in Ye shes rgyal mtshan the quotes refer to the biography
of Red mda' ba composed bySangs rgyas rtse mo, and not to Red mda' ba's autobiography
itself, which is to be found in his Minor Works (see p. 46, and Appendix A, p. 303).
The two manuscripts the critical edition is drawn from are as follows:
Manuscript A
A: dbu med manuscript
90
in cursive script ('khyug bris or 'khyug yig!91. Original filmed by
Leonard van der Kuijp in 1993 in Beijing (VR China), see van der Kuijp (1994: 30):
fols. 44-82, CPN [Minzu wenhua gong Zhongguo minzu tushuguan = China Nationalities
Library of the Cultural Palace of Nationalities (also known as: China Minorities or Ethnic
Library)]92 no. 002802(5); indigenous catalogue no. of the monastic library which had
originally housed this manuscript above the title of the title page as
phyi
ra
85
93
This text no. 85 is missing in the Drepung Catalog.
Van der Kuijp (1994: 2) explains the meaning ofphyi as follows:
The phyi, "external," implies that it was "in circulation;" other manuscripts of the CPN col1ec-
tion sometimes have nang, "internal," as part of their catalogue number, which would indicate
that these were not for the consumption of the respective monastic community at large.
As we know now from the introduction to the Catalog of the Drepung Library (Beijing 2004),
vol. T, pp. 7-16, phyi ra 85 is the shelf mark of a book that belongs to the Drepung Library. The
Introduction to the Text Edition
45
letter ra refers to the genre chos 'byung 10 rgyus. With regard to phyi and nang Gene Smith
gives the following c1arification:
94
The Drepung Library shelflist n ~ longer survives, but the structure is clear. Phyi seems to refer
to the fact that the books bearing this letter were brought from outside. Most of these were
confiscated fi'om the Depa Tsangpa library or from some other collection. They were moved
to Drepung and became the library of the dGa' ldan Pho brang. The ones that have nang seem
to have been the original library collection ofDrepung.
TBRC code: WI CZ1885. Other mentions ofSangs rgyasrtse mo occur in: SeyfortRuegg (2000:
61n131) and Steams (1999: 292).
Unlike manuscript B: no extra top page with CPN no. is included, and the numbering does not
start with page 1, so it must be a part of a larger work. The left margin gives the vol. no. nga.
Title: dPalldan red mda ' ba chen po 'i mamthar ngo mtshar nnad byung zhes bya ba bzhugs
pa 'i dbu lags so (The Amazingly Marvelous Biography of the Great Glorious Red mda' ba).
On p. 82a, this work is said to be 'a summary of Red mda' ba's writings and statements' (red
mda' pa 'i gsung sgros
5
mdor bsdus pa).
Size: 77 pages (39 folia:;); 37 x 5,7 cm; folio 44b-8 lb: 7 lines; folio 82a: 3 lines.
Manuscript B
B: dbu medmanuscript ('jib, also: jib or dpe tshugSJ6 received from Gene Smith, TBRC code
W18649 (4142),1 vol. (scan of photocopies).
Top page: CPN no. 002781 (6f7, short title in dbu can: Red mda' ba 'i mam thar, in Chinese:
Ren da wazhuan, i.e. BiographyofRendawa.
First page: stamp on the right side not legible; indigenous catalog no. of the monastic library
which had originally housed this manuscript above the title of the title page as
phyi
ra
10
This text no. lOis also from the Drepung Library, but missing in the Drepung Catalog.
Title in dbu med' de btsun thams cad mkhyen pa ku mii ra ma ti 'i mam thar ngo mtshar nnad
byung zhes bya ba bzhugs so (The Amazingly Marvelous Biography of the Omniscient Kumiira-
mati de btsun Red mda' ba).
Size: 85 pages (43 folios) top page not included; folio 1 b: 4 lines; folio 2a: 5 lines; folio 2b-42b:
6 lines; folio 43a: 4 lines. This text is about 20-25% shorter than manuscript A. Although it has
more pages, the lines per page are fewer and the length of each line is shorter. Note that this
manuscript includes parts that are missing from manuscript A, but also omits parts that are
included in manuscript A. On p. 40b2 the scribe of manuscript B states that the template he is
working from omits here two sheets (folios): bar'dir dpe cha 'i shog bu gnyis ma [shang. This
part is preserved. in manuscript A, pp. 77b3-80a2.
46 Chapter 4
Secondary Textual Witnesses
In summary the edited text presented here draws mainly from two sources (mss. A and B), 'and
for a few passages from a third related, but separate source, Red mda' ba's Minor Works (M).
Only in a few places have variants from two further secondary textual witnesses been used, Ye
shes rgyal mtshan (Y) and Zhal gdams (R), namely to wit
- a variant being favored,
- as proof for emendation,
to demonstrate that manuscripts A and B sometimes differ commonly from Zhal gdams
and sometimes also from Zhal gdams and Ye shes rgyal mtshan
- to show that Ye shes rgyal mtshan and Zhal gdams sometimes differ from each other,
- to "have another source to collate with, in case text passages were only attested by one
witness (manuscript A or B).
These three witnesses proved to be very helpful, and will be described in the following:
The Minor Works of Red mda ' ba
This text or a copy of it turned out to have been one of the main sources for the author.
M: dbu med manuscript (khams yig) received from Gene Smith, TBRC code W1CZ1871 1 vol.
(scanned from original microfilm copy). Cf. van der Kuijp (1994a: 15-16).98
Top page: CPN no. 004546, short title in dbu can: Red mda' ba 'i gsung (Red mda' ba 's Wri-
tings).
First page: 1a title page (with Chinese stamp) not legible, except an arabic number 1, and next
to it: (7).
Size: 670 pages (335 folios; incomplete from 33 5b onwards) top page not inc1uded;folios 1 b-7a:
dKar chag;folio 1 b: 7 lines, 2 illustrations: left side: Ma ti P ~ chen la na mo, right side: Lo tsii.
ba Byang chub rtse mo Ia na mo;folios 2a-6b: 7 lines each;folio 7a: 5 lines, two illustrations:
left side: Chos Jje dByig pa Ia na mo, right side: Chos rje gZhon b10 pa Ia na mo, last word on
p. 7a: subham; fresh start of pagination: 1a-2b missing;folio 3a: 7 lines, left side: arabic number
2 (277), right side stamp: Min zu wen hua gong tu shu guan cang (Held by the Library of the
Palace of National Minorities), the front half of the first three lines are not legible, because they
have been pasted over with a piece of paper on which it says in cursive script ('khyug yig): r Je
btsun red mda' pa gzhon nu blo gros kyi gsung thor bu ba. Altogether about 102 texts. For
detailed dKar chag of the whole Minor Works see Shes bya'i gter mdzod, vol. 3, no. 006117
(note that the manuscript M available to us does not match the dKar chag given in the Shes bya'i
gter mdzod in all places) and chapter 7.
Among other important writings Red mda' ba's Minor Works contain also the autobiography of
Redmda' ba:
Minor Works, manuscript M, 006
99
: p. 2b5-2b7:
dKar chag of the autobiography (rang rnam) which follows in detail below as texts no. 8,9 and
10 (six lines, nine syllables each):
rang nyid dam pa'i tshul dang mthun byas nasI
Introduction to the Text Edition
skalldan gzhan la' ang , di bzhin ' doms so zhesl
roam thar mdo tsam ston byed ' di dag gol I
. dge sbyong tshulla gdams pa'i t s ~ i g s bcad dangl
. rang nyid ' gyod med gdeng Idan ' gyur rna dangl
rten 'breI de kho na nyid rab byed doll
47
Minor Works, manuscript M, 031, p. 10a6-7 clearly states at the end of these three texts that they
make up his brief (auto )biography:
rje btS1ID dam pa red mda' pa'i gsung 'bum thor bu ba las rang nyid dam pa'i tshul dang mthun
par byas nas gzhan la' ang , di bzhin ' dams soIl zhes mam thar mdo tsam ston pa'i skor gnyis
pa'oll
Minor Works, manuscript M, 029-030, p. 9a4-9b6, CPN, no. 006117 (13? pp. 6):
(8) dge sbyong gi tshulla gdams pa
mdzad pa po Siikya'i dge slong gZhonnu blo gros
Minor Works, manuscript M, 0030-0031: pp. 9b6-10a6, CPN, no. 006117 refers at the end to
004546 (7 pp. 1):
(9) 'gyod med gdeng brod kyi 'gyur rna
(10) rten 'brei gyi de kho na nyid bsdus pa'i rab tu byed pa
mdzad pa po Siikya'i dge slong gZhon nu blo gros
For a detailed catalog of the Minor Works see chapter 7.
Ye shes rgyal mtshan
rJe btsun red mda' ba gzhon nu blo gros ni in Ye shes rgyal mtshan, Tshe mchog gling Yongs
'dzin (1713-1793): Byang chub lam gyi rim pa 'i bla ma brgyud pa'i mam par thar pa rgyal
bstan mdzes pa 'i rgyan mchog phul byung nor bu 'i phreng ba (Short title: Lam rim bla ma
brgyud pa 'i mam thar). With a foreword by Blo bzang Tshe ring. Hsi Ning (Zi ling) (province
Qinghai): Bod Ijongs mi dmangs dpe skrun khang (people's Publishing House of the ART)
1990: 891.27-905.23.
For more details on this work see also Martin (1997: 141, no. 325).
Particularly in the beginning, this text specially reports a large part of Las chen almost verbatim.
In-between it summarizes and adds further passages from Sangs rgyas rtse mo. Quotations are
not marked as such, except verses. While Ye she rgyal mtshan agrees mainly with manuscript
B, it contains also parts that are missing in manuscript B such as chapter 5, section 2.17.1.
Sometimes Ye shes rgyal mtshan agrees with manuscript A or both manuscripts, but it mainly
agrees with the reading of manuscript B. For example, Ye shes rgyal mtshan gives the name of
Red mda' ba's mother dBang phyug skyid, which we only find in manuscript B, or reads sangs
rgyas kyi bstan pa nyin mo ltar, while A reads: bstan pa nyi mo ltar. B reads lung rigs smra ba
seng ge mkhan chen sangs rgyas 'phel, or dkon mchog la gsol ba btab, while A reads: lung rigs
smra ba dbang po mkhan chen sangs rgyas 'phel, and dkon mchog gsum la gsol ba btab.
48 Chapter 4
Towards the end of the biography, while A reads abbr. dge 'dun brgya phrag 1, and B abbr.
brgyaphragphyed 2, Ye shes rgyal mtshanreads similar to B: dge 'dun brgya dang lnga beu.
Further, as in manuscript B, Ye shes rgyal mtshan quotes four of Red mda' ba's Verses on'the
Disadvantages of Desire (see chapter 5, section 2.10.1), which are not contained in A. In many
places Ye shesrgyal mtshan skips verses quoted in Sangs rgyas rtse mo and concentrates on the
descriptions in prose, while in other places Ye shes rgya1 mtshan must have identified the
sources as Red mda' ba's or Tsong kha pa's writings and completes those quotations. Ye shes
rgyal mtshan carries a series of verses, i.e., Red mda' ba's Joyful Songof Assurance of No Re-
gret (chapter 5, section 2.17.1) which is only contained in manuscript A (part of the text where
manuscript B is missing some folios). Ye shes rgyal mtshan gives all the eight verses that stem
from Red mda' ba's Minor Works, while A omits two of them. Thus it is likely that Ye shes
rgyal mtshan had not only access to Red mda' ba's Minor Works and to Las chen, but also to
manuscripts A and B or a third manuscript of Sangs rgyas rtse mo. Ye shes rgyal mtshan also
agrees very often with Zhal gdams. It is noteworthy, if not surprising that neither Sangs rgyas
rtse mo nor Las chen include the very interesting part on hermitages in Mang yul Gung thang
quoted and translated by Ehrhard (2004: 405n168), also contained in my unpublishedMA thesis
(2003: 171, 190), see Ye shes rgyal mtshan 1990: 897.14-898.2. The source has not been
identified yet. However, the parts of Sangs rgyas rtse mo summarized in Ye shes rgyal mtshan
are not sufficient to consider Ye shes rgyal mtshan throughout the critical edition of Sangs rgyas
rtse mo, but it is occasionally referred to.
Zhalgdams
Red mda' ba'i gsung thor bu las zhal gdams 'ga' zhig zur du bkol ba, in sDe gzhung sprul sku
rin po ehe 'jam dbyangs kun dga' bstan pa'i rgyal mtshan la sags pa 'i zhal gdams khag,
Kathmandu: IBA 2003, pp. 53-59. The small brochure has no preface and gives no source. Jre-
ceived it from David Jackson together with the print of Sangs rgyas rtse mo (IBA 2003). All
texts given here - as far as identified - agree with Red mda' ba's Minor Works (manuscript).
One series of nine verses has not been identified in the Minor Works yet (see Zhal gdams 54.13-
55.15). It is contained in manuscripts A and B (see section 2.9.2.1 of the text edition ofSangs
rgyas rtse mo). Zhal gdams has been fully considered in drawing up the critical edition.
Aim of Editing
The aim of the present work is the production of a critical edition by collating two manuscripts
(A and B) and to present the text as a standardized edition. One goal of philology is to identify
and correct mistakes in the received textual tradition. Due to the lac:k of further primary textual
witnesses rather than reconstruct to what was the original text of the author, I have chosen to
correct misspellings according to standards of orthography as represented by dictionaries such
as the Mahavyutpatti Index (1926), Jiischke' s Tibetan-English Dictionary (1881), Sarat Chandra
Das (1902), the Tshig mdzod ehen mo (1984), Goldstein 2001, and in certain cases Illuminator
(2006Yoo. In the event that there was evidence of a rare, archaic reading marked by the indication
Introduction to the Text Edition
49
that it is rnying such readings are favored. In two cases I refer to Dan Martin's Tibetan Vo"
cabulary (2007).101 At times I also refer to the Nitartha Tibetan-English Electronic Dictionary
(1998).102 In the critical edition the reader will find a blending of the two available manuscripts.
In the case of differences, mainly deviations of spelling or grammar, I chose that reading which
follows what is generally accepted as standard Tibetan. For details of editing see below. The
translation is based on this critical edition and the reading chosen.
Methodology of Editing
There does not appear to have emerged a decisive standard for the preparation of critical editions
within the field of Tibetology as yet. As such it may be useful to layout clearly the principles
that this present work follows.
As required the edition is accompanied by a critical apparatus that presents the evidence
considered here, an analysis of that evidence, and a record of rejected variants. The number of
primary textual witnesses transmitted from which the best variants could have been selected was
only two. When I started at the time of my masters' thesis in 2002 with what later turned out to
be one of the basic preparations for the present work, there was only the negative microfilm
copy of one dbu med manuscript (manuscript A) available, which I had transcribed by hand into
dbu can by a group of monks from Sera The monastery (Bylakuppe) under the guidance of the
present Sera The abbot Geshe Lobsang Palden.
After having received the handwritten dbu can rendition drawn up by eleven monks, each of
whom had transcribed about ten pages (5 folios), I started entering that text into the computer.
Initially I was comparing it word by word to the dbu med manuscript, but then discovered soon
that this was much too extensive an undertaking to be handled properly in the frame of my
masters' thesis. Since that project was limited in time and scope, at the time I was unable to
consult it as much as I would have liked, especially because the text contains many abbrevia-
tions, i.e. shorthands for monosyllables (mgyogs bris), abbreviations of c.ompound words and
phrases or contractions (bsdus yig), and elided spelling (skung yig). For lists of abbreviations,
see below (p. 57). Furthermore the Sera transcript contained several copyists mistakes from
manuscript A, and thus a thorough revision was required. Through personal conversation with
the respective monks in Sera, I learnt that they had also faced many difficulties in deciphering
the text. Sometimes they approached monks from a nearby small Sa skya monastery hoping to
get help from them with regard to some perhaps Sa skya specific terms. As a result,. the word-by-
word comparison to the dbu med manuscript in its whole had to be postponed. Instead, at that
time I simply entered the Sera dbu can transcript as it was and then compared only those parts
to the dbu med manuscript that were to be quoted in my masters' thesis.
Later the next year, in 2003, after having finished my masters' thesis and the entering of the
dbu can letter transcript, my supervisor Davidlackson brought a Tibetan-style book (dpe cha)
from Kathmandu containing a collection of biographies that rnA Kathmandu had just published
in a limited edition and that to my surprise, among others contained 'my' text. In 2004 through
extensive personal communication I fmally got hold of a copy of the manuscript they had used
as template for producing a computer-input offset print. It turned out to be a copy of exactly the
50
Chapter 4
same manuscript A.
ID3
Therefore in the text edition and in the rest of the present work the print
is referred to as A' (eliminatio codicum), or Sangs rgyas rtse mo (IBA 2003).
In 2004, I started entering the cursive manuscript A in the computer checking against the 'text
already entered, comparing it carefully, word by word, to manuscript A. Since from the philolo-
gical point of view Sangs rgyas rtse mo (IBA 2003) did not need to be considered, I only
consulted it when there seemed to be a deviation between the Sera transcript (already entered in
the computer) and my own reading of manuscript A. Whenever! had doubts whether manuscript
A had been correctly transcribed by the Sera monks, I checked with the IBA print. Thus it
became evident that in most of the cases the print carried the same wrong reading as the Sera
rendition. They seemed to have largely accepted the Sera transcript and only corrected it in a few
places. To See, whether my suspicions were correct, in April 2008 I checked it with Sera The
Khen Rinpoche Geshe Lobsang Palden. He confinned that he had given a copy of their transcript
to the Sa skya monastery in Bylakuppe. Most likely it had been forwarded to IBA then. Alt-
hough the print was thus not of great benefit for drawing up the critical edition, it was extremely
helpful when consulting Tibetan scholars to discuss certain questions with .them.
In January 2005 thanks to Gene Smith a second edition of the same work unexpectedly came
into my hands, this one an dbu med manuscript (B). Checking five pages as samples from the
beginning and end of manuscript B, especially the colophon, it became clear that it is without a
doubt the same text, but with variant readings, a different title, different number of pages and
different type of dbu med script, and most important, with a remark by the scribe on p. 40b that
in his pattern two folios were missing. Thus manuscript A is the only complete manuscript we
have. According to TBRC's website they had been holding these digitally scanned microfilm
images, tiffs and pdf files only for a short time then.
This second manuscript was of great value, but at the same time at this stage of the project its
discovery led to a lot of additional work and fmally made the prolongation of this project
necessary. Supposing that only one witness (codex unicus) existed, I had already started drawing
up a 'diplomatic edition', dissolving abbreviations and correcting misspellings. The goal was to
show every orthographic feature of the text. But now, being confronted with another edition of
the same text, with its orthographical or grammatical variants and sometimes also variants in
terms of content required me to go for a further time through the whole text and to draw up a
critical edition.
Relationship Between the Two Surviving Primary Witnesses
Right from the outset of studying these manuscripts, the question arose as to what the relation-
ship is between the two surviving witnesses. Which is closer to the archetype? Orcould one
even be the original, the autograph? From the viewpoint of preservation it would be a possibility,
since the earliest Tibetan manuscripts are dated pre-millennial, and the climatical conditions in
Tibet are very conducive to conservation. However our witnesses do not belong to the corpus of
"Old Tibetan Manuscripts."ID4
The process of cO.Q.structing the stemma was started by analyzing the two manuscripts A and
B accordingly, following the principle that "community of error implies community of origin."
Introduction to the Text Edition
51
That is, -if two witnesses have a number of errors in common, it may be presumed that they were
derived from a common source (archetype) or a common intermediate source (hyparchetype). In
the process of collation - as the critical apparatus will show - the two witnesses show several
errors in common (Leitfehler or Bindefehler), which indicate that they have a common source.
But they have also several disconnecting errors (Trennfehler), that is, the two witnesses have
deviations that make it likely that they developed separately and are not directly related. But as
we will see below in the section on peculiarities in the manuscripts A and B (see p. 55), in
manuscript A on several occasions ligatures are marked with dots on top, that means that they
are to be deleted. It is noticeable that letters or words marked in manuscript A are omitted in
manuscript B. At the same time contamination could be assumed for manuscript B, since it
contains parts that are not included in manuscript A. But these other source( s) could also be Red
mda' ba's or Tsong kha pa' s Minor Works and not a second predecessor. Whether contamjnation
of the core text has taken place can neither be proven nor excluded due to the lack of further
independent primary textual witnesses.
It is also possible that errors or alternations were made by scribes, who copied the manu-
scripts by hand. When comparing the two documents or witnesses of this single text, it is not
apparent which variants might better represent the author's original work and which entered the
text secondarily, as accidental or intentional changes introduced by persons other than the
author, as could easily have happened during the work's transmission. Furthermore two man-
uscripts are not nearly sufficient to reconstruct the text of the archetypus. According to Paul
Maas (1957: 6) for its reconstruction the main splitting needs to be at least triple. Ideally, one
would consider a far greater number of texts before making such assertions. Such work may be
possible at a later point of time. Recently nine further folios of the texts were listed in the
Catalog oJOld Books in Drepung Monastery.IOS All attempts to get a copy failed.
However, when comparing manuscripts A and B, it is evident that many of the emendations
that I had made in the beginning when working with manuscript A alone, were attested by the
variant presented in manuscript B. This means that the orthography of manuscript B is more
standardized and has fewer grammatical errors. According to standard orthography in more than
twice as many cases as in manuscript A, manuscript B is correct. Furthermore it is conspicuous
that manuscript B, unlike manuscript A, contains hardly any text that was crossed out by the
scribe to make corrections or deletions, nor does it have many visible insertions. As such, it
looks more tidy. Many of the passages and terms that are visible corrections and insertions to be
found in manuscript A appear as the final reading presented in manuscript B. In other places, the
reading of manuscript A is more correct according to standard orthography, specially when it
comes to rarer terms. At times manuscript B offers more precise statements. When for example
A reads go rims, while B reads go rim, I follow the standard orthography go rim as mentioned
above. Even, ifboth manuscripts read nyams thag pa (cf. chapter 5, note 18), which according
to Goldstein 2001 is a non-standard spelling sm. to nyam thag (cf. Mvy, S.v. 7334 nyam thag pa
-artha, Jaschke 1881: nyam(s), nyams thagpa'i skad or sgra), I have emended to the standard
spelling nyam thag pa, since I could not fmd any evidence that nyams thag pa is an old spelling.
Rather several Tibetan dictionaries explicitly consider nyam thag pa the "correct spelling" (cf.
bSam gtan, et a1. bDag yig gsar bsgrigs 1973; Brag g.yab Blo Idan shes rab, Bod brda'i tshig
52 Chapter 4
mdzod. 1989; Bod gzhung shes rig dpar khang, Dag yig rna nor lam bzang 1995; Negi, J. S.
1993-2005. Tibetan Sanskrit Dictionary. vol. 4). And even if both manuscripts and the Minor
Works read sdzogs instead of rdzogs as for example in bsnyen sdzogs, the critical edition'will
read bsnyen rdzogs, especially because this meets the standard already laid down early in the
Mvy, and there is no evidence for a later revision of this standard known to me. According to
Szerb (1990: XVIln47) "there is no rdz- in dbu med." I could not find this confirmed with
Tibetan language teachers at CIHTS. Some suppose that super-fixed ra (ra mgo) does exist and
that this super-fixed letter may just look like super-fixed sa (sa mgo) when in combination with
other basic letters (ming gzhi), while others suppose that ra mgo does exist and looks different,
but could not find any example in other dbu med scripts. However, the scholars had no doubt
that rdzogs is the correct standard spelling.
With regard to content, from a historical point of view, it is important to note that manuscript
B carries several passages that are not to be found in manuscript A. Sometimes only a few words
appear additionally, sometimes a few lines. These are - as far as possible - all kept and marked
in the main text or clearly marked in the text edition. For example, the name of the mother of
Red mda' ba is only given in manuscript B. Further, while in manuscript A a one-line praise by
Tsong kha pa is given, in manuscript B we frod a four-line praise instead of that line. In such
cases the respective passage appears in square brackets with the respective siglum, such as [B:
.,. 1 together with an explanatory footnote. But sometimes manuscript B is also missing parts to
be found in manuscript A. For example in manuscript A we frod four verses taken from Red
mda' ba's Letter to Tsong kha pa about the Decline of the Doctrine, which are to be found in
Red mda' ba's Minor Works. They are missing in manuscript B, against which elsewhere four
verses from Red mda' ba's Verses on Disadvantages of Desire, which are also from his Minor
Works, are only to be found in manuscript B, but not in manuscript A. Most important, as
mentioned above, is to note that on p. 40b2 the scribe of manuscript B states that the template he
is working from omits "here" two sheets (folios). This part is only preserved in manuscript A,
pp. 77b3-80a2. This needs to be considered a disconnecting error, that clearly shows that our
witnesses A and the template of manuscript B from a certain point onwards have developed
separately and were no longer directly related. On the other hand manuscript A is missing the
third line in the last verse, the "chos praise," at the end of chapter 5, section 2.5.10. This line is
preserved in manuscript B, p. 12a, line 2. This could be considered another disconnecting error,
but could be also an addition from an independent source or a scribal error.
Due to the paucity of primary textual witnesses, as mentioned above, it is not possible to
complete a stemma. Nor is it possible to take the next step of selection or selectio, wherein "the
text of the archetype is determined by examining variants from the closest hyparchetypes to the
archetype and selecting the best ones," due again to the shortage of suitable witnesses. When no
source preserves the correct standard reading and I have no evidence that at least one of two
alternative readings can be considered an old spelling, it has been emended as clearly documen-
ted in the critical apparatus.
Introduction to the Text Edition
53
Details of Editing
When starting with the present critical edition, models had been: Jackson (1987: vol. 1,229 ff.),
Szerb (1990: XI-XX), and Everding (2000: 18-39). Although dealing with canonical literature,
Iwas also inspired by the models of Zimmermann (2002) and Harrison (1992). With regard to
abbreviations I especially considered Bacot (1912), Eimer (1992: 54 ff.), and Szerb (L990: 123-
24). I also considered the works by Maas (1957) and Jager (1990). But fmal1y, due to the
peculiarity of the present work, it turned out that here a different approach will be required, since
we do not have enough textual witnesses to compare with and cannot decide which of the two
manuscripts is closer to the archetype as well as to preserve the differences in content in the
main text. At least in such cases the classical philological method used for Greek manuscripts
only works to a certain extent.
I06
The details of the principles of editing adopted here are as
follows:
Although there are no chapter divisions in any of the two manuscripts A or B, and no dKar
chag or table of contents has been drawn up for the only available print of Sangs rgyas rtse mo
(IDA 2003), the Tibetan text oftlle text edition has been separated into paragraphs and divided
into chapters for ease of handling. Sometimes the chapters have been further subdivided into
sections, depending on length and content. As far as possible the chapter breaks coincide with
natural breaks in the text, such as a division into part I (Introductory Verses) and part II (Verse-
by-Verse Commentary) that is to be found in manuscript A only. Furthe=ore paragraphs have
been made wherever there is a completing particle (rdzogs tshig), and at the beginning of a new
introductory verse which is usually followed by a kind of commentary in prose on the verse.
These sections vary in length. Unlike in the Tibetan text, verses are marked off from prose and
always kept together, regardless oflength of the verse passages, since ease of reference is readily
maintained by the numbering of verses.
The biography contains verses of two sorts: the introductory verses, composed by the author
and commented on as part of the biography, and those he is simply citing. The fo=er appear in
square brackets and in Part II in bold, while the latter appear within round brackets. Often for the
verses cited, no source is given. Many could be identified, although several still require identifi-
cation.
The main text has been printed in Roman script system provided with a critical apparatus.
For both of them Turrell Wylie's 'Standard System of Tibetan Transcription' is used.
I07
In the
critical apparatus Sanskrit terms that were transliterated into Tibetan script as well as ab-
breviations are as far as possible depicted according to the rules for the 'Extended Wylie
Transliteration Scheme' (for details, see p. 56). However, in the main text these appear with
diacritics for better legibility and optical reasons. For Chinese terms Pinyin transliteration has
been used.
Since scans of both manuscripts are held by the TBRC, thus far unknown abbreviations that
are typical in the two manuscripts A and B can be reflected more accurately by consulting the
scans. To give an overview, common lists of abbreviations for the two manuscripts have been
drawn up. The abbreviations to be found in both manuscripts are almost the same.
54
Chapter 4
The critical apparatus contains variant readings as well as other important notes. To avoid
redundancy and for the purpose of clarity and uniformity, word explanations are given most of
the time in the notes of the English translation, unless they are not ofimportance there. Thus also
most of the archaic terms favored are discussed in the annotations to the translation. In most
cases the variants are easily accounted for as coincidental scribal lapses, intended
'improvements', or old spellings. As a rule, abbreviations have been tacitly completed and listed
in the lists of abbreviations
l08
(see p. 57). But in the event that they occur as part of the variants,
they have been left in their place and are transliterated according to the schemes mentioned
above. Sometimes they are given to demonstrate how manuscripts A and B match. Partly the
apparatus also contains single readings, i.e., variants attested by only one witness. When we had
secondary textual witnesses as described above, they have been consulted to secure my reading.
In order to keep the apparatus as concise as possible, only the Tibetan morphem concerned
has been taken as the unit of reference. Thus when manuscript A wrongly reads khor med, while
manuscript Breads 'khor med, "'khar B : khor A." suffices to indicate the variants. To reduce
the number of footnotes, but also for some other reasons such as insertions by the scribes or
deviations in many successive syllables, in one footnote several syllables may appear together,
although they are not directly related to each other but belong to separate words. For example:
"zhes pa ni bdag B : ces <pa ni bdag> A." Or: "khar gsal em. : khar bsal A: kar gsal B." (from
the context: mar me 'chi khar gsal ba !tar). If both variants have been considered to be wrong
and are in need of emendation, this is indicated following the example: "rigs em. : rig AB." To
avoid ambiguity as to whether one or more syllables are referred to in case of omission, both
variants are given "phyag gis A : om. B," or "om. B : pa 'i A."
As regards the manuscripts A and B, variants are generally not noted in the following instances:
1. Punctuation: Following the example ofSzerb (1990: XVI, no. 1), apart from a few examples,
the differences in the usage of the shad are not indicated. In most cases the placement of the
shad follows manuscript A. In case they are indicated, they appear in the critical apparatus
as comma, while in the main text as slash.
2. When the Tibetan text contains a reversed -d (= D) it is transliterated -gs or sometimes -g
(and in the latter case additionally listed in the lists of abbreviations). When the Tibetan text
contains an anusviira (= M), this is written as m, unless the abbreviation occurs in a
documented variant or in some examples in the critical apparatus.
3. When digits or parts of words are given in numerals such as for example 3 for gsum or 4n for
bzhin, unless the abbreviation occurs in a documented variant or in some examples on the
first pages of the critical edition.
lo9
4. When abbreviations of compound words and phrases are used, they are listed once in the lists
of abbreviations, unless they occur in a documented variant or once as an example. In the
main text the expansions of such abbreviations are spelled out and not marked out by round
brackets.
5. When rdz-looks like sdz-, I always transliterate rdz- since the latter seems to be the standard
in dbu med as explained above.
Introduction to the Text Edition
55
6. When about 40 times throughout the text the word lugs is abbreviated IuD in manuscript B,
while manuscript A reads lug, omitting suffix -s, unless it occurs as part of another documen-
ted variant The same goes for rtogs compi. : rtoD B : rtog A (about 22 times), rigs compi. :
riD B : rig A (about 30 times),.and legs compi. : leD B : leg A (about 10 times).
Peculiarities of Manuscripts A and B
Noticeable are the following orthographical peculiarities: Both manuscripts contain many abbre-
viations, i.e. shorthands for monosyllables (mgyogs bris), abbreviations of compound words and
plu:ases or contractions (bsdu yig), and elided spelling (skung yig). For lists of abbreviations, see
p. 57. Especially conspicuous is the use of more uncommon shorthands such as ch+ ya = chags,
thya(s) = thugs, gz+yi(s) = gzigs, gsh+yes = gshegs, (g)s+ya = gsungs, and elided spellings
such as th+ye = thugs rje, gz+ya = gzugs, and l+yaudng= long spyod.
Furthermore, more often in manuscript B than in manuscript A, we fmd elided spellings such as
mkhas'i for mkhas pa 'i, mkhyen 'i for mkhyen pa 'i, mchod'i for mchod pa 'i and so on, which in
the critical edition and the lists of abbreviations are also only listed in the beginning for a few
times as an example, but are not indicated in the apparatus throughout the whole edition.
Most important is: In manuscript A on several occasions single letters or ligatures are marked
with dots on top, which means that they are to be deleted. The letters or words marked are
omitted in manuscriptB. See notes 1318, 1339, 1412,1521,1585,1701,1714,1742,1758,
2110,2389,2499,2685,2710,2841,2878, 1985,2018,2057,2057, 1758,2110,2389,2499,
2685,2710,2841,2878. There are only two exceptions (see note 1592, and note 1472).
Abbreviations in the Edition and Apparatus
Most abbreviations used are based on Jager (1990: 56), West (1973: 80-81), and Lexikon der
alten Welt (2001: 3023), but occasionally deviate. They are used as follows:
A, B capital letters of the Latin alphabet are used as sigla for individual extant manuscripts
M here a rare manuscript copy of Red mda' ba's Minor Works
abbr. abbreviation, i.e., shorthands (mgyogs bris), contractions (bsdu yig), 'elided spelling'
(skung yig) are listed below and only mentioned in the apparatus in case of special
reason
cf. confer
compi. completion, i.e., the full form of standard contraction (since one cannot consider it as
emendation)
em. emendavit, emendaverunt
id. idem, same
italic technical or specialist terms and title of scriptures
56 Chapter 4
ms. manuscript
mss. manuscripts
om. omisit, omiserunt
( ) round brackets mark ordinary parentheses, the numbering of cited verses and expan-
sions of abbreviations (mainly listed in the lists of abbreviations ?elow), or two
possible variants -
< > angle brackets enclose letters, words or passages added to the text by the scribe
[ ] square brackets are commonly used for editorial deletions or to mark off parts of the
text lost through physical damage to the extant source, but here they are used to mark
parts of the text added such as headlines, numbering, and to mark parts whiclJ. are only
part of one of the two manuscripts the critical edition is based on, e. g. [A: ... ] or [B:
... ], or parts added from the Minor Works [M: ... J.
{} braces are used as the sign of deletion by the scribe or later editors. When the letters
deleted, are still legible, they are given in braces
illegible letters (hyphens in braces indicate the corresponding estimated number of
letters deleted, {---}
(43 a) pagination of the Tibetan manuscripts A and B; the siglaA and B are only mentioned
once at the very beginning of the edition, because the page numbers do not intersect; A
starts with 44a and ends with 82a, B starts with la and ends with 43a
(S267) pagination of Sangs rgyas rtse mo (lBA 2003), kept for the convenience of the reader
Transliteration System
Turrell Wylie. 1959. "A Standard System ofTibetan Transcription," Harvard Journal of Asiatic
Studies 22, pp. 261-267.
Extended Wylie Transliteration Scheme by Nathaniel Garson and David Germano, Tibetan &
Himalaya Digital Library, University of Virginia 11/26/2001.
Tibetan & Himalaya Digital Library: Rules Extended Wylie Transliteration Scheme,
www.thdl.org (status: October 19, 2005).
Alexandru Anton-Luca: Teaching THDL Extended Wylie, www.thdl.org (status: October 19,
2005).
Introduction to the Text Edition 57
Lists of Abbreviations used in the Cursive Manuscripts
The lists of abbreviations given here, are divided into shorthands for monosyllabic words
(mgyogs brisy 10, abbreviations of compound words and phrases, i.e., contractions (bsdu yig), and
elided spelling (skung yig). Shorthands which are in general well known such as anusviira for m
and reversed d for fmal -gs are not all listed here. I am only giving some examples. They occur
in many words, i.e., in khaMs for khams, 'jaM for 'jam, mnyaM for mnyam, gdaMs for gdams,
'doMs for 'doms, etc., or in rtaD for rtags, rtoD for rtogs, thiD for thigs, thuD for thugs, thoD
for thogs, etc. The same goes for elided spellings which we fmd only in manuscript B such as
mkhas'i for mkhas pa 'i, mkhyen'i for mkhyen pa 'i, mchod'i for mchod pa 'i, and so on.
Shorthands for Monosyllabic Words (mgyogs bris)
Abbr.
Unabridged Form
3
gsum or sum (as in mngon sum)
4n
bzhin (as in rang bzhin)
bkaD bkag
gal+te
gal te
bsgoM
bsgom
ch+ya
chags
mchoD mchog
nyaMs
nyams (as in nyams thag)
gtaM
gtam
rt+ya
rtags
theD
theg (as in thegpa)
th+ya thugs
th+yas
thugs
th+yas daM thugs dam
th+yasu
th(u)gs su
'duD 'dug
sdoM sdom
maMs mams (as in bsod nams)
buM bum (as in bumpa)
'byaMs 'byams (as in rab 'byams)
m+yin mea) yin
tshoD tshogs
gz+yi gzigs
gz+yis gzigs
y+ni yin
Bacot no. Scan
679
076
58 Chapter 4
riD rigs
r+se res
laswo pa la sogs pa
leDs legs (as in dge legs)
IuD lugs
l+yes legs
gsh+yes
lll
gshegs
bsh+yas bshags
saskya sa skya
seMs sems 631
soD sogs
swo sogs
s+ya gsungs
gs+ya gsungs
bsaMs bsams
bsaM+s bsams
Contractions (bsdu yig)
skabsu skabs (s)u 27
skaldan skal (l)dan
mkha'gro mkha' C)gro
gisung gi (g)sung (as in drung gi gsung)
gurM gur (gu)m 79
gyuraM gyurram
gragsog grags so(gs)
'gyedang 'gyed (d)ang (as in 'gyed dang bcas pa)
rgyugsung rgyugs (gs )ung
sgrog+s sgrogs (as inyis sgrags)
brgyadgos brgyad (b )gos (as in cha brgyad bgos pa)
ceso ces (s)o
choskyong chos (s)kyong
chosde chos (s)de (as in chas sde snad)
mchogi Il?-chog (g)i
'jigsu 'jigs (s)u
Introduction to the Text Edition
59
Ijesu
rjes (s)u
nyamsu
nyams (s)u
ruyedang
ruyed(d)ang
brtenas
ll2
brten (n)as
bstanas
bstan (n)as
dagi
dag (g)i (as in de dag gi)
deg
de (da)g 295
drengs
dr(a)ng (ng)es
bdagir
bdag (g)ir
'dugaM
'dug (g)am
nadang
nad (d)ang
namkha' nam(m)kha'

naMkha' nam(m)kha' ,,j)(,,,,.
gnadu
gnad(d)u
pad+makar po padma (d)kar po

pas+gribs pas (s )gribs (as in mui't pas sgrib)
dpal+dan dpal O)dan 378
spangste
spangs te 113


babsu
babs (s)u
byonas
byon (n)as
blozang blo (b)zang
'brugi 'brug (g)i
'brus 'br(a)s (b)u 462
'brelr 'breI (ba)r
migis mig (g)is
mig+si mig (g)is

minga' mi (m)nga' (as in mi mnga' ba)
mithun mi (m)thun
mod m(a)d (d)o
m+tego me tog 481

tsan+dan tsan dan

btsuen btsun (n)e

tshigi tshig (g)i
tshigsal tshig (g)sal
'tshalo 'tshal 0)0 (as inphyag 'tshallo)

60
Chapter 4
mdzod mdz(a)d (d)o
zhal+ta zhal ta
zhalog zhallog
zhigis zhig gis (as in 'ga' zhig gis)
zheso zhes (s)o
gzhonu gzhon (n)u 563
zins zin (n)as
yino yin (n)o
yuMb y(a)b (y)um
593
y+ton+yi yo(n) t(a)n (g)yi
604
rai'i re (r)e'i
......... ,t\.
l.,,!'II.l,
lagsaM lags (s)am
lagso
lags (s)o
lags+Do lags (s)ogs
saskya sa skya

srasu sras (s)u
Elided Spelling (skung yig)
kuen
ku(n mkhy)en 4
kuob ku(nrdz)ob 3

kuob[tsa rtags]114
ku(n r)dzob (tsa rtags on b)

kun+yis kun (g)yis

klrub kl(u sg)rub
..
dkaug 3 dko(n mch)og gsum

dkaugi dko(n mch)og (g)i cf.15
dkaugsuM dko(n mch)og (g)sum
cf.14
dkyior dkyi(l 'kh)or
18
bkris
bkr(a sh)is 25
skued sku (mch)ed
khau
l15
kho (b)o
khyadar khyad (p)ar
46

khyed khy(adm)ed

khyod+yi khyod(k)yi

mkhas'i mkhas (pa)'i
Introduction to the Text Edition
61
rokhen
mkh(an ch)en
mkbro
mkh(a' 'g)ro

mkbro'
mkh(a)' Cg)ro 61
: ....
rokhyen'i mkhyen (pa)'i
'khaur
'khor (1)0
gyuig
gyu(r c)ig

gruob
gru(b th)ob 88
dgeun
dge Cd)un 97
dgreub
dge Cd)u(n gru)b
..
dgain
dge (bsny)en

dgais
dge (bsh)es
99 o).li ...
dgeong dge (sby)ong
--=-..
l,g)I.'
dgel[tsa rtags] dge tshul 1\3'N\,
dgleong dge (s)long
dgroM
dgr(a bc)om 104
mgaun'i mgon (P)o'i cf.107 ...
'ga'phangs 'ga(1) 'phangs

'gig
'g(a' zh)ig "'--
.("0,"""0::"'\\
'giD
'g(a' zh)ig
rgy[tsa rtags]o rgy(a m)tsho (tsa rtags on rgy) 120
rgyan[ tsa rtags] rgya(l m)tshan (tsa rtags on n) cf. 128

!ff?,'
rgyun[tsartags] rgyumtshan
ngaus ngo (b)os
ngor[tsa rtags] ngo (m)tshar 138
nw
dng+roub dngo(s g)rub 141
mngounM mngon(s)um 143


-=->
cungd cung (za)d
cf, 150

ces+ya ces (gsun)gs

bcuig bcu (gc)ig 155
bcuis bcu (gny)is 156
bcuM bcu(gsu)m 157
bc+rug bc(u d)rug 160
bc+yod bco (brg)y(a)d 162

bc+doMs bcom (l)d(an 'da)s 163
..L..
o..v4\
..,-
cheno
chen (P)o cf,179
62 Chapter 4
che no'i chen (P)o'i
chenogrig chen (P)o (na)g rig

chenor chen (p)or

mchod'i mchod (pa)'i

chon cho(s ca)n (as in shes bya chos can)
chos+yi chos (k)yi


choes chos (rj)e

mch+toen mcho(d) (r)ten 194

mchoen mcho(d rt)en 194
____
jau jo (b)o 200
j+tir ji (l)t(a)r 198
'jaMI 'jam (dp)al 202
'jien 'ji(g rt)en
206

ny+li nyi (z)l(a) 213

nyiu nyi (sh)u 214
nyes'i nyes (pa)'i
nyos ny(an th)os

nyaungs nyo(n m)ongs
219
snyiong snying (P)o 231
tingin ting (' dz)in
tingni ting (' dz)in

tingni[tsa rtags] ting ('dz)in 235

tingeni[ tsa rtags] ting (ng)e (,dz)in 235

rtrel rt( en 'b )rel

rtrail rte(n 'b )rel 243
.....

ltu It(a b)u
ltu'i !t(a b)u'i
ltur It(a b)ur
ltus It(a b )us
ston'i ston (pa)'i
bstan'i bstan (pa)'i
bstin[ tsa rtags] bst(a)n ['dzin] 247
: ..
bstodr bstod (pa)r
bstos bc)os 246
thaMd tham(s ca)d 251
Introduction to the Text Edition 63
thaJ.\tfdang
tham(s ca)d (d)ang
thaig
theg (ch)e(n)
cf. 264
thieg
thig Ie
253
-------
thueD
thugs (rj)e
cf.255

thugs aM
thugs (bs)am
thugskye
thugs (bs )kyed
thuong
thu(nm)ong
261

thuoMng
thu(n) mong

theoM
the (ts)om
cf. 262
::::::2
f1lg,
th+ye[tsa rtags]
th(u)gs (rj)e
cf.255
%'
mthag
mthaC da)g
mthaso
mthaC ya)s (s)o
cf.271 .
mthong'i
mthong (ba)'i
mthrug
mth(a)r (th)ug
cf.275

dong
d(a)ngp(o)
--..
, W'
dangor
dang (p)or

duor
dues 'kh)or :3<..
deg
de (da)g
295
don+rub
don Cg)rub
296
drin+yi bdain
drin (g)yi bde (ch)en
gdul+ya
gdul (b)ya
312
bdain
bde (ch)en
322
bdid
bd(ag ny)id
315
q}\ .
bduid[ tsa rtags]
bdud (rts)i
cf.320

bdego
bde (mch)og

-41: ",,-,.
=-- .
bdeom
bde m( ch)o(g)
Q)Q\.'
bded
bd(ag m)ed
cf.316
4V";
bdaiD snyingo
bde (bzh)egs snying po
cf. 323
Fu)l.'1.W
mdoe
mdo (sd)e
'dod'i 'dod (pa)'i
rdoe
rdo (rj)e
331
rdoeng
rdo (rj)e ('cha)ng
332
rdor dril
rdo rUe) (dang) dril (bu)

Idanr
Idan (pa)r
'l!,"\t,.
bsdul sdu(g) b( snga)l 336
64 Chapter 4
nos no(d na)s
maMg mam(da)g 359
maMr mam (pa)r (as in rnam par dag pa 'i)

maMs+yang mams (k)yang

maMs+yi mams kyis

moMg mams rtog 361
mor m( al 'by)or 368
piri p(a')i (phy)ir

spr+rol spro( s bra)l
cf.394
... ,
phunM phun (su)m


phuog[tsa rtags] phu(n) tshog(s) (tsa rtags on g)

pher ph(al ch)er
phol ph(a r)ol
cf. 396
I:ii'l-u.,.
phrog phr(ag d)og
cf.415

phy[tsa rtags]alo phya(g 'tsha) 10
cf.407


phy[tsa rtags]al phya(g'tsha)l cf. 407

phiol phyi (r)ol cf.411
phris phri(n la)s
416

'phris 'phri(n la)s
....
'phrins 'phrin (la)s

biri ba'i phyir (as in bral ba'i phyir)

bued bu(dm)ed
cf. 420
......

byang sesM byang sems
12t\\it'i\,
byin+labs byin (r)labs byin (gyis) (r)labs 434
.. \
byin+yis brlabs byin (g)yis brlabs cf.433
.. .

byub by(ang ch)ub 431
byed'i byed (pa)'i
byesM by(ang s)ems
byengMs by(a)ng (s)ems

bral'i bral (ba)'i
blaus blo (gr)os
446
dbyugi db(ang ph)yug (g)i
cf.454

manE tsa rtags] m(tsh)an

m+ngag m(a.J?) ngag cf.469
"<><t"'"
mueD mu (st)egs 477
3{'
Introduction to the Text Edition
65
dmiD'i
dmigs (pa)'i
.... "
J"'l.'"
rmiM
rmi (la)m 495
smonaM
smon (la)m 498

gtsau
gtso (b)o
503

gtsaur
gtso (b)or cf.502

brts+rous
brtso(n 'g)rus 517
.....:L- '

tshruirn
tshu(l kh)rirn(s)

tshruisM
tshu(l kh )rirns 521
.."
mdzod
mdz( a)d (d)o
, in[ tsa rtags] 'dzin (as in 'dzin pa) 542

idzu1
rdzu ('phru)l (looks like sdzul) cf.544

zhuig
zhu(y)ig
552
zhes+ya
zhes (gsun)gs
zhes+ya ba
zhes bya ba
zhesungs zhes (gs )ungs

gz+ya gz(u)gs
bzodr bzod (pa)r
y+lag ya(n) lag cf.591

yangg yang (da)g cf.588
.... , .... '
yais ye (sh)es
600
yier yi (g)er
cf.494

yine yin (t)e
yul yun yul yu(l ca)n
rangni rang (bzh)in cf. 612
4.i
rine rinchen
cf.625

rinoe rinpo che
cf. 626

rino che rin (P)o che

.. .. ,,!
rai'i re (r)e'i

legr leges pa)r
leDr legs (pa)r
loD l(a s)ogs (pa)
l+yaudng long (sp)yod cf.639

shinu shin (t)u cf. 646

sheb she(s ra)b 648

sher
she(s) r(ab)
,.

66
shes+ya shes (b)ya
cf.647
E\V:
sh+yeon sh(es) (b)y(a ch)o(s ca)n
'-s..-

sh+yes chon shes (b )y(a) cho(s ca)n

bshain bshe(s) (gny)en 652
sar+yas sa(ngs) r(g)yas 655
senge seng (g)e

saing seng (g)e ..
seMda' sem(s) d(p)a' cf.657
,,-...=- ,
'"'1<\"
seMn sem(s ca)n
659

sesM sems (as in byang sems) 656
-.
lil'L\\
sau'i so (s)o'i cf. 664
saur so sor 665
saung so(ng s)ong
slaun slo(b dp)on
673
slaun chenG slo(b dp )on chen (p )0


slaub slob (dp )o(n)

gsalr gsal (ba)r
gsal+yed gsal (b)yed
bstaMn bsam (g)t(a)n 682 09,.".
bsodMs bsod (na)ms 684
lhrub lh(un g)rub 698

Text Edition
[0 Title]
A44a dPalldan
l
red mda' ba
2
chen po'i mam thar ngo mtshar rmad
3
byung zhes bya ba bzhugs
SO/4
A44b / BIb / 8266
[1 Part I]
[1.1]
[1.2 Verse 1]
[1] bden gnyis gnas lugs
8
don rtogs mkhyen pa rgyas/
dpalldan compI. : abbr. dpaJ+dan A; see chap. 4, "Lists of Abbreviations used in the dEu medManu-
scripts." Apart from some exru:nples, abbreviations have been tacitly dissolved and listed in that list,
unless there are deviations from the abbreviations used in the dbu med manuscripts. In this case they are
noted once.
2 ba em. : pa A. Regarding both attested spellings Red mda' balpa see chap. 6, English translation.
3 nnadem.: smad A; cf. 45a2, first cluster: nnad(corresponds to p. 70, verse 11). See also notes 151, 1696.
4 so em. : pa'j dbu lags+Do (read: lags sags) A; cf. A' (Sangs rgyas rtse mo 2003: 265): bzhugs so. The
idiom dbu lags so means there are at least two parts dbu and zhabs = stod and smad, and this is part one,
i.e. the introductory verses opposite to the following parts or here the second part (i.e., the verse by verse
commentary, seenote 159). The tile of manuscript B reads slightly different: BO: redmda'pa(read: ba'l)
mam thar. Bla: de btsun thams cad mkhyen pa ku ma (read: mA) ra ma ti'j mam thar ngo mtshar nnad
byung zhes bya ba bzhugs so.
S mA em.: maAB.
, ma tayeem.: <ma>ti laA: ma tiyeB (prob. failed Skt. dative matiyeof matif.).
7 namaHB: na moA. Final-aHbecomes only -0 before voiced consonants, h-and a- (sandhi rule), but not
at the end of a sentence. Skt. guru kumiira mataye namafJ corresponds to Tib. bla ma gzhon nu blo gras la
phyag 'tshallo.
, lugs compi. : abbr. IuD B : lug A. Note: Where ms. A often omits the post-suffix (yang 'jug) -s, ms. B
reads often -r;! (Tib. da log; see Jottotshang 1975, 76), here transliterated D. See for example notes 8, 10,
30. In ms. A sometimes Dis -g. See for example notes 1191, 1371. In the view of Prof. Ngawang Samten,
CIHTS (personal communication Feb. 24, 2008) Tibetan da log can be used for suffix (des 'jug) -g as
well as for -gs. According to Tashi Tsering (personal comunication Dec. 2006) in Situ Rinpoche'
grammar, which CIHTS and all Tibetan schools in exile rely on, for example "lung dgs' needs suffix -so
But in Norbu Tenzin's grammar (from Khams), suffix -sis left out in several cases, for example lung dg
instead of lung dgs. In practice this difference among two different grammatical rules led to much
confusion among authors, scribes and editors, adding and deleting this suffix throughout the texts. Here,
in this critical edition, apart from listing of a few first examples and documentation of deviations, as a rule
-D is tacitly transliterated -gs depending on the context and today's standards of orthography. If it stands
for final -g, it is documented in the critical appartus or the respective word is listed in the lists of ab-
68
Chapter 5
byang chub
9
thugs
lO
gnyis
ll
'byongs pa'i thugs rje canl
mkhyen rab thugs rje 'gran zla ma mchis pa'i/
dpalldan bla ma'i zhabs la phyag 'tshallo
12
//
[1.3 Verses 2-4]
[2] 'od srung13 nye bar
l4
'khor dang kun dga' bos
iS
/
dgra bcom
l6
lnga brgya'i bla gos khri steng
l7
nasi
nyam
l8
thag dbyangs kyis 'di skad bdag thos zhes/
ston pa'i mdzad tshul gus pas brjod pa bzhin
l9
/
[3] bka' drin 'khoro med chos rje rin po chef
l
mthong ba'i skaf2 med dran pa'i yul du gyur/
nyin mtshan bsams
23
kyang yon tan mtha' ma rtogs/
cha y?4 cha tsam gus pas brjod bgyid
25
nal
[4] thub bstan nub khar
6
dar zhes gsungs
27
pa'i doni
bstan pa'i mjui
8
'dir skyes chen khyod
29
byon nasi
breviations.
byang chub compI. : abbr. byubAB.
10 thugscompI.: abbr. thuDB : thug A; cf. Jiischke 1881: byang chub mehog tu sems(orresp. thugs) skyed
pa.
il gnYlscompI.: abbr. 2AB.
12 phyag 'tshallo compI. : abbr. phyag 'tshalo A : abbr. phyalo B.
13 snmgem.: bsnmgs A: bsnmgB; cf. Panglung (1981: 281): 'od srung(kiisyapa); Zimmermann 226: 'od
snmg; Mvy, s.v. 3545, 3706, 9079 verifies four spellings: 'od snmg(s), 'od bsrung(s).
14 barem.: ba AB; cf. Mvy, s.v. 1062: nye bar 'khor- upiili
15 boscompl.: abbr. b+so A: bo B. Note that Jjod pa is transitive and therefore requires an agentive particle.
Note also that ms. A subscribes suffix (Jjes Jug) -sto save space (cf. Eimer 1992: 61). Mvy, s.v. 3609:
kun dga' bo - iinanda.
16 beom compI. : abbr. beoM AB (syllable-closing m like Indian anusviira), cf. Eimer (1992: 56nl). From
here onwards tacitly written out, unless it occurs as part ofa variant. See also Szerb (1990: XVI, no. 1).
17 steng B : stengs A.
IS llyam em. : llyaMS AB; cf. Jaschke 1881: nyam(s), nyams thag pa'i skad or sgra; Goldstein 2001, s.v.
nyams thag- a non-standard spelling sm. to nyam thag; Mvy, s.v. 7334 nyam thag pa - iirtha.
19 bzhin A : abbr. 4n B.
20 'khorB: khorA. Cf. p. 79, verse 3: 'khormed AB.
21 nn po che A : abbr. nlloe B.
22 skal B: skabs A; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.v. skal med - abbr. skal ba med pa - 1. having bad! negative/
unmeritorious kanna.
23 bsams compI. : abbr. bsaM+s A: abbr. bsaMs B.
24 ehayiB: eha'iA. Because of metre. Note deviationp. 79: 'chi baA: ehayiB.
25 bgyidem.: bgyisAB; cf. p. 79, verse 3. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. bgyidpa- (td.) bgyispa, bgyi ba, gyis
- byedpa.
26 kharA: karB.
27 zhes gsungs A : abbr. zhesungs B. On June 13, 2008 Ulrike Roesler mentioned during a lecture at
Hamburg university that she noted with regard to a certain text that there gsungs referred to canonical
texts and gsungto personal sayings. It seems that in this text gsungs is either perfect tense of gsung ba or
refers to quotations from canonical as well as other texts, while gsungrefers to oral statements.
2S mjug A : abbr. Jug B.
29 khyod em. : khyed AB; cf. p. 80, verse 4.
Text Edition
Ita spyod nyams len mam dag spella dgongsl
(20) rgyal bas lung (8267) bstan khyod la phyag 'tshalloll
[1.4 Verses 5-22]
[5] bsams bzbin srid bzhes ehos ldan su 'khrungs I
bstan pa'i sgor zhugs yongs 'dzin mkhas mang bsten
31
I
sdom
32
pa gsum
33
blangs srog las
34
gees par bzunt5 I
thub pa'i ring lugs
36
khyod la phyag 'tshall0
37
11
[6]mdo rgyud bstan beos kun la sbyangs nasi
-rtag chad mthar Ita'i grub mtha' ma Ius pal
mam dag lunt
9
dang dngos stobs rigs
40
pas bshig
log smra tshar geod khyod la phyag 'tshallol I
[7] lung rtogs yon tan thabs mkhas thugs Ije
41
yisl
gdul bya'i khams dang bsam pa bag la nyall
ji bzbin mkhyen pa ehos kyi42 'khor 10 bskor
43
I
skalldan
44
Ijes ' dzin khyod la phyag 'tshallo/I
[8] bdag med gnas lugs rtOgS pa'i shes rab
45
kyisl
kun rdzob rten 'bre1
46
sgyu ma Ita bur
47
gzigs
48
1
30 rigscompL: riDB: rigA.
31 bsten em. : brten A : sten B.
32 sdam compL : abbr.: sdaM AB.
69
33 gsum compL : abbr. 3 AB. From here onwards numerals are always tacitly written out, unless they occur
as (part of) the variants.
,. lasem. :pasAB.
35 bzrmg B : gzrmgs A.
,6 ring lugscompL : ring luDB : rig lugsA. Cf. Iiischke 1881: ring lugs,-Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. ring
fugs 1) ring du gnas pa 'i lugs srollam ring nas chags pa 'i lugs sroL
,7 phyag 'tshalla compL : abbr. phy[tsa rtags]ala AB.
38 legs compL : leD B : abbr. leDs A.
,9 lungB: {-} iungA.
'0 rigsem.: rigAB.
'1 thugs IjecompL: abbr. thueDA: abbr. th+ye[tsartags]B.
'2 chos kyi A : abbr. chos+yiB.
., 'khor 10 bskorcompL : abbr. 'khaur bskor A: abbr. 'khaur skorB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. skor ba
- I. (td.) bskor ba, bskar ba, skoT.
44 skalldan compI. : abbr. skaldan A : abbr. bskaldan B; Mvy, s.v. skalldan - bhagya or bhavya. Eimer
(1992: 58) mentions that he could only find one example for this contraction (bsdu yig).
's shes Tab compL : abbr. sher A : abbr. sheb B.
46 rten 'brei compL : abbr. rtrel A : abbr. rtrailB.
.7 Ita bur A : abbr. ltur B.
48 gzigscompL: abbr. gz+yisA: abbr. gziDB; cf. note 8; gzigs(h) mthongba dang Ita ba;similar ligatures
see Krasser, p. 1, no. 4, abbr. gz+ya = gzugs; Eimer (1992: 56nl) gshye = gshegs.
70
Chapter 5
don dam chos dbyings nam mkha,49 Ita bur rtogs/
Ita ba mam datO khyod la phyag 'tshallo//
[9] bshes gnyen dul ba
5
! zhi ba
52
nyer zhi bal
sdoms pa kun
53
ldan nyes ltung dri rna bral/
sgo gsum rna bcos !hug pa'i ngang la bzhugs
54
/
spyod pa mam dag khyod la phyag 'tshallo/ /
[10] tshe 'di bIos btang Sgrub
55
pa snying pormdzadl
bden bzhi rten 'breI (450) phyin drug rim gnyis bsgoms
56
/
phyag rgya chen po (2b) mchog gi dngos grub bmyes/
nyams len mam dag khyod la phyag 'tshallo//
[11] thugs dam
57
zab mo gnad dusnun
58
pa'i rtags/
bla rna yi dam mkha' 'gr059 chos skyong sogs60/
rgyun du gzigs kyang rang rgyal brtul zhugs bstenf!
ngo mtshar rmad byung khyod la phyag 'tshallo//
[12] gangs ri'i khrod kyi che btsun 'byor ldan gyis/
(8268) gus pas spyan drangs myed dang bkur stis
62
mchodl
dbang bskur sems bskyed
63
gdams
64
pa mang du zhus/
kun gyis65 mchod ' OS66 khyod la phyag 'tshallo//
49 nam mkha' compl. : abbr. namkha' A : abbr. naMkha'B.
50 mam dagcompl. : abbr. maMgB : abbr. maM<g>A (-ginserted in reduced size -dotted line from -gto
tsheg).
51 Jiischke 1881: prop. pf. of 'du! ba.
52 baA: zhingB.
53 kun A : gSUln B. LN: gsum is clearer, but we are following here the technique lectio ditJiciiior potior"the
harder reading is stronger," that means the more difficult or more unspecific is more likely the initial
form.
5. bzhugsem.: <b>zhug A: abbr. zhuDB; cf. p: 130, verse 9.
55 sgrubB: bsgrubA; cf. p. 138, verse 10. Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.v. sgrubpa- (td.) bsgrubspa, bsgrub pa,
sgrubs.
56 bsgoms em. : <b>sgoM A : sgom B. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sgom pa - (td.) bsgoms pa, bsgom pa,
sgoms.
57 thugs dam compl. : thugs daM A : thuD daMB.
5. snunB: <b>snunA; cf. p.142, verse 11.
59 mkha' lIrocompl.: abbr. mkhroA: abbr. mkhro'B.
60 sags compl. : abbr. soD B : abbr. swo A, i.e. so with subscribed wa zurfor final -gs; cf. Krasser, p. 1, no.
4, abbr. gzugs sags. From here onwards tacitly written out.
6l zhugs bsten compl. : zhuD bsten B : shug brten A.
62 stisA: bstisB.
63 bskyedB: <b>skyed A.
64 gdams compl. : gdaMs B : gdaM A; cf. Jiischke 1881: gdam pa - to advice, gdams pa sbst. advice etc.
65 kun gyis A : kun+yis B.
66 'osB :paA; cf. p.176, verse 12.
Text Edition
[13] 'brug gi
67
10 la myangan 'da,68 dgongs nasi
go rtogs
69
nyams su myong ba'i zab don mamsl
ston pas bstan pa gtod pa ji bzhin duJ
chos 'khor nan ' doms khyod la phyag 'tshallol I
[14] 'khor 'das chos kun skye ba med bstan nasi
de nyid ngang la my a ngan ' da' bzhed na' ang I
gus pas gsol btab
70
ngo ru zhag bdun barf
sku tshe byin brlabs
7
! khyod la phyag 'tshalloll
[15] 'chi ba 'od gsallus la brten mi srid!
Ius sems bral nas mam shes stong par zhugs
72
1
dbyings rig dbyer med ' od gsal yin no zhesl
yang yang gsungs pa
73
khyod la phyag 'tshalloll
[16] sngar bsgoms
74
'pho ba'i man ngag
75
gsal btab nasi
rtags 76 mams rna Ijed dga' spros77 , od gsal 'jug
'gog las ldang
78
zhing sngon gyi 'phen pas 'phol
gsung bzhin mdzad pa khyod la phyag 'tshalloll
[17] sku tshe 'di yi79 dngos kyi gdul bya
80
lal
zab rgyas chos kyi 'khor 10 bskor zin nas'!
, chi ba ' od gsa! skabs su gzhan don gshegs
82
1
skye 'chi dbang thob khyod la phyag 'tshallol I
[18] (3.) sgyu Ius kun rdzob bden pa mam par dag
, od gsal don dam bden pa mngon du gyurl
67 'brag gi compl. : abbr. 'bragi AB.
68 'da'B: 'dasA; cf. p. 179, verse 13.
69 Cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. go rtogs -go don rtogs pa.
70 btab B : tab A.
71
71 byin brlabs compl. : abbr. byin+Iabs A : byin riabs B; cf. p. 182, verse 14. Different from the use as noun.
See also note 91: byingyisrlabs;cf. Jiischke 1881: byin2. byingyisrIobpa, pf. brlabs, ft. brIab, imp.
riobsto bless, to create, to change into; byin rIabsblessing. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. byin gyis brlabs
pa;Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. byin riabs.
72 zhugscompl.: abbr. zhuDB: (b}zhuDA.
73 gsungspaem.: gsungbaAB; cf. note 2637.
74 bsgoms compI. : bsgoMs A : sgom B.
75 man ngag A : abbr. m+ngag B.
76 rtags B : rtag<s> A.
77 sprosA: sproB; cf.p.183, verse 16.
78 'gog las Idangcompl. : 'goD las Idang A: 'gog las 'dangB; cf. p. 183, verse 16. See Illuminator, s.v. II.
v. i.Idangs pa, Idang ba, ldang ba- 2i) to arise from ... (in the case of meditation).
7, 'di yiB: 'di'i A (metre).
80 gdul byacompI.: abbr. gdul+yaAB; Jiischke 1881: gdulv. 'dul ba.
S! zin nas compl. : abbr. zins AB.
82 gshegscompI.: abbr. gsh+yesA: abbr. gsheDB; cf. note 48.
72
Chapter 5
zung 'jug rdo rje 'chang
83
gi go 'phailg
84
bmyes
85
1
'phrin las lhun grub
86
khyod la phyag 'tshalloll
[19] zhing gzhan gshegs tshe sa chen rab tu g.yosl
dpa' bo mkha' 'gro
87
lha mams 'dus gyur nasi
phyi dang nang dang gsang ba de kho nas
88
1
mchod nas spyan drangs (8269) khyod la phyag 'tshalloll
[20] ye shes
89
me yis khyod sku bzhu ba'i tshel
mkha' la sprin med bar snang rlung yang zhi/
sa la drod rgyas (45b) bzhin byin gyis brlabs
91
1
rten 'breI dbang thob khyod la phyag 'tshalloll
[21] ston pa'i sku gdung cha brgyad bgos
92
pa bzhinl
khyod gdung dad ldan lha rni grangs med kyis93 I
phyogs bcur spyan drangs mchod pa'i
94
rten du gyurl
sku gdung rgyas mdzad khyod la phyag 'tshallol I
[22] mthong thos dran reg gtam du brjod mams kyisl
'di phyi bar do'i mgon skyabs dpung gnyen mdzadl
bslu med skyabs gnas dpal
95
ldan red mda' ba9
6
1
, dren mchoi
7
dam pa khyod la phyag 'tshalloll
83 rdo Ije 'changcompl. : abbr. rdoe 'chang A : abbr. rdoeng B.
84 'phangB: 'phangsA. cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. go 'phang;Jascbke 1881: go, compo go 'phang(s).
8S bmyes A : myes B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. bmyes pa (tmd.) go 'phang bmyes pa.
86 'phrin las lhun grub compl. : abbr. 'phris lhrub A : abbr. phris lhrub B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. 1.
phrin las, 2. 'phrin las. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v.Ihun grub 1) lhun gyis grub pa ste 'bad med rang bzhin
gyis grub pa.
87 mkha' ;g.rvcompl.: abbr. mkhroA: abbr. mkhro'B.
88 LN: de kho na is an uncommon abbreviation of de kho na nyid; here perh. due to meter.
89 yeshescompl. :yaisAB.
90 dbyarB: g.yarA; cf. p. 189, verse 20.
91 byin gyis brlabs B : abbr. byin+yis briabs A; cf. note 71.
92 brgyad bgos compl. : abbr. brgyadgos A : brgyad bsgos (sic) B; cf. Jascbke 1881: bgos pf., imp. of bgod
pa - to divide, to distribute.
93 kyis A : kyiB; 'dren pa is transitive and therefore demands agentive particle
94 mchod pa'j A: abbr. mchod'iB.
95 dpalidan compl. : dpal+dan B : d{-JI+dan A.
96 red mda' ba em. : re mda ' pa A : red mda' pa B; cf. note 2.
97 mchog B : A .
Text Edition
[1.5 Verses 23-33]
[23] kye rna kye hud bstan pa'i srog'8 shing chag
bstan 'dzin dge 'dun
99
phyogs bcur 'thor
100
lags solllOl
[24] kye rna kye hud thar pa'i rgyal rntshan
102
'gyel/
thar ' dod marns kyi thar lam stor lags soil
[25] kye rna kye
103
hud legs bshad dga' ston nyarnsl
blo gsal marns kyi re thag chad10
4
lags soil
[26] kye rna kye hud lta ba'i nyi rna nubl
klu sgrub
105
yab sras lugs bzang su yis
106
ston
107
1
[27] kye rna kye
108
hud dam chos rgya rntsho skarns
109
1
thogsllO rned sku rnched bshad srol su yis
111
skyong1l21
[28] (3b) kye rna kye
113
hud lung rigs114 rnche sder 'thor
l15
I
phyogs1l6 glang chos grags rigs tshul su yis1l7 spell
[29] kye rna kye hud tshul khrims
118
bum pa zhig
yon sak
119
mam gnyis sdorn brgyud
120
su yis121 'dzin!
"
99
srogB : srogsA; cf. Jaschke 1881: srog, camp. srog shing.
dge 'dunA: abbr. dgeunB.
'thor B : mthor A; cf. Jiischke 1881: 'thor ba.
73
100
101
lags so campI. : abbr. lagsoA: abbr. laD so B; one of the eleven concluding words in Tibetan Gram-
mar.
102
103
10'
105
106
107
108
109
1I0
111
112
1I3
114
115
116
1I7
1I8
1I9
120
121
rgyal mtshan campI. : abbr. rgyan[tsa nags] AB; cf. Bacot no. 128.
kyeA:kyiB.
ehadB : bead A.
kfu sgrub B : kfu grub A; cf. Jiischke 1881: kfu (Skt. niiga), kfu sgrllb, prop. n., Niigarjuna.
yisB :yiA.
ston B : bston A; Jiischke 1881: stonpa 1. vb., pf. and fut. bstan; Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. stonpa
- 1. (td.) bstan pa, bstan pa, stan.
kye B : <kye> A.
skams B : skam+s A; cf. bSam gtan, et ai. bDag yig gsar bsgrigs: skams alternative for skam.
thogscompI.: thoDB: thogA.
yis em. : yi AB.
skyongAB; cf. p. 73, verse 27.
kyeA: kyiB.
Cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. lung rigs: dpe eha 'i lung dang nag dpyod kyi rigs pa, lung rigs gnyis
kyi sgo nas sgrub pa.
'thor B : mthor A; cf. note 100.
phyogsB :phyogA.
yiscompi. : yi<s> B : yi A.
tshul khrims campI. : abbr. tshruisMB : abbr. tshruim A.
shAkem.: shakB: shagA.
brgyudem.: rgyudAB.
YlsB :yiA; cf. p.l92, verse 29.
74 Chapter 5
[30] kye rna kye hud spangs
l22
rtogs go rirn
l23
'tshol
l24
j
'phags
l25
seng gnyisl26 kyil27 legs bshad
l28
su yis sgrogsl29j
[31] kye rna kye hud nyarns rtogs130 byin rlabs13 I yall
ti13210 na
l33
ro'i man ngag su la zhuj
[32] kye rna (8270) kye hud phan bde'i
134
pad tshal zuml
bshad sgrub
135
bstan pa gcig car
B6
nub lags sol37j/
[33] kye rna kye hud nyarn
138
thag yi re rnug
139
khyod
140
sku mig gis141 rnthong ba'i skal bas dben/
[1.6 Verse 34]
[34] khyod gsung ma
142
bas thos pa'i bsod narns rned!
khyod thugs
143
gang na bzhugs kyang byin gyis rlobs
l44
j
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
spangsB : spang A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. spangs rtogs - dri ma bral zhing yon tan khongdu
chud pa ste, sgnb gnyis bagchags dang bcas pa thams cad byang ba dang,ji Itaji snyed kyi mkhyen
pa mngon du bmyes pa ni bde bar gshegs pa 'i spangs rtogs kyi yon tan phun sum tshogs pa '0.
rim B: rims A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. go rim; l1ischke 1881: go rim.
'tshol ba sm. to Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'khmg pa 1. (tmd.) 'khmgs pa, 'khrug pa 1) go rim 'tshol
ba 'am nor ba.
'phagscompl.: 'phaDB: 'phagA.
gnyiscompl.: abbr. 2AB.
kyiB :gyiA.
legs bshadB: lung rig A; cf. p. 192; yerse 30.
sgrogscompl.: sgrog+sA: sgroDB.
Cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. nyams rtogs; laschke 1881: nyam(s)rtogs.
byin rlabsem. : abbr. byin+labA: abbr.: byiblabsB; cf. note 91 and p. 192, verse 31.
tiB: teA.
nAB: naA.
bde'iB : bde A; cf. p. 192, verse 32.
sgmb B : bsgmbs A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. bshad sgnlb - chos 'chad pa dang nyams su len pa.
gcig car em. : abbr. 1 char AB; cf. laschke 1881: gcig, gcigchar- single, only. Tshig mdzod chen mo,
s.v. cigcar-lhan cig gam dusmnyam. See also p. 192, verse 32. See also Negi vol. 3.
l1ischke 1881: lags pa - resp. and e1eg. saying for yin pa and 'gyur ba, to be; lags so like yin.
nyamem.: nyamsAB; cf. note 18.
mug B : muD A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. yi re mug - yi mug pa dang don gcig, yi mug pa-
sems sdug pa 'am sems pham pa.
khyodB : khyed A.
mig giscompl.: abbr. migisB: mig+siA.
maA: snaB.
thugscompl.: abbr. th+yaAB.
byin gyis rlobsem.: byin gyis brlobsA: abbr. byin+yis brlobsB; imp., cf. n. 71.
Text Edition
75
[1.7 Verse 35]
[35] dge legs yon tan chu gter chen po lasl
chu thigs tsam zhigl"45 blangs la
l46
nyes pa'i tshogs/
147
ji snyed mchis pa thams cad mthoi 10
148
bshags
l49
I
zhabs 'bring gnyug ma'i tshogs la bzod par
l50
gsol/
[1.8 Verse 36]
[36] bla ma'i mam thar ngo mtshar rmad
l51
byung 'di!
bshes gnyen (46a) bsod nams grags sogsl52 bkas bskul nasi
grangs med gdul bya'i tha shal
153
mnga' ris pal
.. mi phyed dad thob sangs rgyas
l54
rtse mos sbyar
[1.9 Verse 37]
[37] dge ba 'di dang dge ba'i rtsa ba gzhan/
ma Ius blo yis gcig tu bsdoms
l55
byas nasi
bla rna mchog
l56
1a gus pas phul ba yisl
bla ma dam pa'i thugs dgongs yongs rdzogs nasi
.. dpalldan bla ma'i mam thar 'khyong ba
l57
yi/
sku gsung thugs kyis byin gyis brlab tu
l58
gsol [A: !]159
145
146
147
14'
149
ISO
lSI
152
153
154
ISS
156
157
IS'
1S9
tsamzhigB: <gciD>tsamA. LN: tsamzhig, cf. liischke 1881: tsam-also emphat.: chosde tsamzhig
bshadnas.
Sobisch (2005: 113): 1a after perfect stem: close chronological sequence; (2005: 120) 1a as copula be-
tween verbal actions.
nyespa'itshogscompl.: abbr. nyespa'itshoDsA: abbr. nyes'itshoDB.
mtho11ocompl.: abbr. mtho1oB: mtho1oA; cf. Tshigmdzod chen mo, s.y. mtho1 ba-l.(trod.) sgrog
pa 'am, mi gsang bar smra ba, 2. nyes ltung byung ba roams pa gsang med par bshad pa stc, ltung ba
phyir bcos kyi nang gses shig.
bshags compl. : abbr. bshy{i}as A: bshaDB. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'chags pa - (td.) bshags pa,
bshag pa, bshogs - rang skyon mi gsang bar shod pa 'am Ijod pa, ... rang skyon 'chad pa,. .. sdig pa
bshags pa, .. .ltung ba bshags pa.
bzodparA: abbr. bzodrB.
nnadB : sniadA; cf. note 3; liischke 1881: nnadpaorratherusually: nnaddu byungba, nnad byung.
grags sogs compl. : abbr. graD soD B : abbr. gragsog A.
tha shalB : tha bshal A; cf. Jiischke 1881, Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. thashal.
sangs rgyas compl. : abbr. sar+yas AB, cf. Bacot 655.
bsdoms em. : abbr. sdoMs AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sdom pa 1. (td.) 2. bsdoms pa, bsdom
pa, sdoms - sdudpa.
mchog B : mchoD A.
'khyong ba em. : 'khyong pa A: 'khyongs pa B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'khyong ba - (trod.)
'khyongs pa, 'khyong ba - mu mthud pa'am 'khyo1 ba;Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'khyo1 ba - (trod.)
mthar phyin pa.
byin gyis br1ab tu em. : byin+yis rlab tuB : abbr. byin+yis br1abs su A; fut. see note 71.
Here in IDS. A a 'snake stroke' (sbruJ shalljmarks the end ofa section oftext (don tshan);cf. Extented
Wylie Transliteration Scheme, University of Virgin a, 11/2610LSeealsonote 4 ofthis text.
76
Chapter 5
[2 Part ll]
[2.1 Verse 1]
[1] bden gnyis gnas lugs don rtogs
160
mkhyen pa rgyas/
byang chub thugs
161
gnyis 'byongs
162
pa'i thugs rje can!
mkhyen rab thugs rje 'gran zla ma mchis pa'il
(4a) dpa11dan b1a ma'i zhabs la phyag 'tshallo/
zhes pa 'ni
163
mi 'phrog
l64
pa'i mkhyen rab dang thugs rje dpag tu med pa mnga' ba'i bdag
nyid
165
mkhas pa'i
l66
dbang po dpalldan red mda' ba
167
zhes/
[2.1.1]
mtshan yongs su grags pa de nyid kyis168 kun rdzob kyi bden pa gzugs169 nas mam mkhyen gyi
bar gyi chos thams cad/
170
spyi mtshan rang gi ngo bOS
17l
stong par thugs su (8271) chud cing /
rang mtshan lag mthil gyi skyu172 ru ra ltar gzigs pa ji snyed pa mkhyen pa dang / don dam
pa'i
l73
bdenpa 'khor 'das kyi chos thams cad kyi gnas lugs spros pa'i mtha' thams cad dang
174
bral bar thugs su chud pa ji Ita bal75 bzhin
176
mkhyen pa'i ye shes mnga' bas na mkhyen pa'i ye
shes rgyas177 pa'o//
[2.1.2]
'gro ba mtha' dag
178
'khor ba sdug bsngal gyi rgya mtsho
179
las grol bar 'dod pa'i lhag bsam
mam par dag pa'i go bgos shing sgroI bar byed pa'i sbyor ba phun sum tshogs pa'i brtson
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
17.
171
172
173
174
175
17"
177
178
179
Cf. Iiischke 1881: rtogs pa, sems rtogs pa.
thug.s"compl.: abbr. th+yasA: abbr. th+yaB.
'byongs B: 'byong A.
zhes pa niB : A: ces pa 'di
'phrogA: 'phroDB; the term of negation miin front of the verb is used only with present and rarely
with future tense; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'phrogpa - (td.) phrogs pa, 'phrog pa, phrogs.
bdagnyidcompl.: abbr. bdidAB.
mkhas pa 'i A : abbr. mkhas'iB.
ba em. : pa AB.
kyis B: kyi A.
gzugs compl. : gzuD B : gzug A.
thams cadcompl. : abbr. thaMd AB; cf. Eimer 1992, 104.
ngo boscompl.: abbr. ngausAB.
skyu A : kyu B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 1. skyu ru I8 (Skt. limaIaki); 2. kyu ru I8 - skyu ru ra
dang'dra.
pa'iB: om. A.
thams cad dangcompl. : abbr. thaMdang AB.
Ita ba B : <Ita ba> A; insertion in dbu can, below the place marked by a cross, betweenji and ba.
bzhin A : om. B. .
rgyasB: brgyasA.
mtha' dag B : abbr. mthag A.
rgya mtsho compl. : abbr. <rgya> mtsho A : abbr. rgy[tsa rtagsJo B.
Text Edition
77
'gruS180 dang Idan pasl smon pa dang 'jug
l81
pa'i byang chub kyi thugs gnyis 'byongs pas na
thugs rje chen po dang Idan pa' 011
de lta bu'i 182 mkhyen rab dang thugs rje rnnyam pa'i lhag pa gangs can 183 gyi khrod na med pasl
'gran zia dang bral ba'oll
dag nyid chen po'i zhal rnnga' nasi
srid zhi stong
l84
par lta ba'i shes rab dang I
mkha' rnnyam 'gro Ia dmigs pa'i
l85
snying rje gnyisl
res 'ga,186 res 'jog re 'ga' zung 'breI sgoms
187
1 zhes gsungs
188
1
[A: bstod pari chos Ije bio bzang grags pasj189
mkhyen rab gzhan dang skal ba mi rnnyam zhing I
(46b) mkhan chen chos rgyal basi
snying po chen po'i bde drod rab 'bar bal
zhes soll]190
[2.1.3]
[B: bstod pari chos rje bio bzang pasj191
dri med mkhyen pa'i dbang po 'jam pa'i dbyangsl
dmigs med brtse ba'i gter chen spyan ras gzigsl
gangs can mkhas pa'i gtsug rgyan red mda' bal
gzhon nu bio gros zhabs Ia phyag 'tshalloll
ISO
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
brtson 'gros B : abbr. brtsrous A.
'jug B : mjug A.
lta bu 'i A : ltu ~ B .
gangs can B : gang can A.
stong B : 'byongs A.
mnyam 'gIo la dmigs pa 'i compl. : mnyaM 'gIo la dmiD'iB : mnyaMs 'gIo la dmig pa 'i A.
Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. res 'ga' -mtshams mtshams sam skabs reo Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. re
'ga' - 'ga' zhig gam kha shas dang, skabs 'ga ~ Jaschke 1881: res, res 'ga '.
sgomsem.: sgoMAB; cf. Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.v. sgompa-I. (td.) bsgomspa, bsgompa, sgoms.
zhes gsungs compl. : abbr. zhesungs B abbr. zhes+ya A; cf. example for final -gs in Krasser, p. I, no.
4 gZllgS.
chos Ije blo bzang grags pas compl. : abbr. <choes bio bzang grags pas> A.
ba mi mnyam zhing, mkhan chen chos rgyal bas, snying po chen po 'i bde drod rab 'bar ba, zhes so em.
: abbr. pa mi mnyaM zhing <mkhan chen chos rgyal bas> snyiong cheon 'i bde drod rab 'bar ba zheso
A.
chos Ije blo bzang pas em. : <cheos blo bzang pas> B.
dri med mkhyen pa'i dbang po 'jam pa 'i dbyangs, dmigs med brtse ba 'i gter chen spyan ras gzigs,
gangs can mkhas pa 'i gtsug rgyan red mda' ba, gzhon nu blo gros zhabs la phyag 'tshallo zhes so em.
: abbr. dd med mkhyen 'j dbang po 'jaM pa 'i dbyangs, dmiD med brtse ba 'i gter chen spyan ras gziD,
gangs can mkhas pa 'i gtsug rgyan red mda' pa, gzhonu biaus zhabs la phyalo zheso B. Source: Red
mda' ba gzhon nu blo gros la phyag 'tsha!, in Tsong kha pa 'i bka "bum thor bu, gSung 'blun, vol. kha,
p. 7bl-2. Cf. Toh. 5274 (5) A salutation to Red mda' ba Kumiiramati. It reads slightly different as
follows: dd med mkhyen pa 'j dbang po 'jam pa 'i dbyangs, tshad med brtse ba 'i gter chen spyan ras
gzigs, gangs can mkhas pa 'i gtsug rgyan red mda' pa, gzhon nu bio gros zhabs kyi pad+mor bdud For
more details on the origin of this praise, its meaning and its change to the famous dMigs brtse ma
praise ofTsong kha pa Blo bzang grags pa see my unpublished MA thesis 2003: 127-35. Cf. beginning
78 Chapter 5
tshogs gnyiS193 kyi (4b) dpal dang ldan zhing I dbang rgyud manngag phyin ci ma log pa thob
cing I thugs SU
194
chud nas ston pa bla ma'i sku'i cha thams cad kyi [B: dman pa zhabs kyi]
padmo la rang gi yan lag
195
kun gyi mchog
196
spyi bos ' dud pas Ius dang I gang gi drin gyis Ode
chen 197 nyid/ ces sogs kyis bstod pa
198
ngag dang I dad cing gus pa bskyed pas
199
yid depoo [B:
sgo gsum] gus pa'i sgo nas phyag 'tshalloll
[2.2 Verses 2-4]
[2] 'od (8272) sruniO
I
nye bar 'khor0
2
dang kun dga' bOS
2
0
3
1
dgra bcom
204
lnga brgya'i bla gos khri steni0
5
nasi
nyam thai0
6
dbyangs kyis
207
, di skad bdag thos zhesl
ston pa'i mdzad tshul gus pas brjod pa bzhinf
8
zhes
209
pa nil ston pa'i nyan thos
210
b r g y a ~ l l khri bzhi stong gi nang nas sbyangs pa dang I ' dul
ba
212
, dzin pa dang I mang du thos pa mams kyi [B: nang nas] mchog tu gyur pa ' od sruni
13
dang Inye bar2
14
'khor dang kun dga' bOS
215
stonpamyangan las 'das pa'i 'og tu/bstanpa dam
pa'i chos yun ring du gnas par bya ba'i phyirl bstan ' dzin dgra bcom pa lnga brgyar gcig gi ma
193
194
195
190
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
200
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
ofRatnasrupbhava's biography of Red mda' ba (2003: 242.1): dmigs /l1.ed brtse ba'i gter gyurspyan
ras gzigs, dri med mkbycn pa 'i dbang po Jam pa 'i dbyangs, gangs can mkhas pa 'i gtsug rgyan red
mda' ba, gzhon nu b10 gras zhabs 1a phyag 'tshaJ 10.
tshogsgnyiscompl.: tshaD2B: tshagnyisA.
thugs sucompl. : thuD suB: abbr. th+yasuA; -ys= final -gsas in Krasser, p. 1, no. 4 gzugs;cf. note
188.
yan lag A : y+1ag B.
mchog B : mchaD A; cf. note 97.
drin gyis bde chen em. : abbr. drin gyi bdain A : abbr. drin+yi bdain B.
ces sags kyis bstad pa em. : ceswa kyi bstod pas A : cesoD kyis B.
bskyedpascompl.: <b>skyedp+saA: bskyedpaB.
de em. : te A: ste B; continuative particle (lhag bcas) de used after suffix -d; cf. Schubert (1937: 47),
Hahn (1996: 148).
srung B : bsrungs A; cf. note 13.
bar em. : baAB; cf. note 14.
bosA: boB; cf. note IS.
dgra beam compl. : abbr. dgroM AB.
steng A: stcngs B; cf. Jiischke 1881: steng.
nyam thag em. : nyams thag B : nyaMs thag A; cf. note 18.
kyis B : kyi A.
bzhin B : gzhin A.
zhes B : ces A; phrase connector (tshig phrad) zhes after suffix -n.
nyan thas A : abbr. nyos B.
brgyadB : brgya A.
baB: ba'iA.
srungem. : srungsB: bsrungsA; cf. 13.
barem.: baAB; cfnote 14.
bosB: b+saA.
Text Edition
79
tshang ba
216
bsduS
217
nasi de dag gf18 bla gos kyi khri steng219 nas ston pa'i yon tan dran nasi
nyam
220
thag pa'i dbyangs kyis 'di skad bdag gis thos pa'i dus gcignalbcom ldan 'das
221
rgyal
po 'i khab bya rgod phung po 'i ri lal zhes sogg222 kyi sgo nasi ston
223
pas dang por224 byang chub
kyi mchog tu thugs bskyed
225
/bar du skal pa
226
grangs med
227
gsum
228
du tshogs
229
bsags
230
/ tha
mar mdzad pa bcu gnyis231 kyis 'gro ba'i don mdzad pa'i tshul mngon pal 'dul bal mdo sde'i sde
sno
d232
rin po che mam pa233 gsum legs par2
34
bsdus
235
pa bzhin du/
[2.3 Verse 3]
[3] bka' 'drin 'khor med chos rje rin po chef
mthong ba'i skal236 med dran pa'i yul du gyur/
nyin mtshan bsams
237
kyang yon tan mtha' (Sa) ma rtogs/
cha yi238 cha tsam gus pas brjod bgyid
239
nal
zhes pa nil bdag240 sogs gdul bya mams la yang dag pa'i lam bstan pa'i bka' drin 'khor2
41
ba
med pa'i chos kyi242 rje rin po che
243
de nyid mig shes kyis mngon sum244 du mthong ba'i skal
21"
211
218
21.
220
221
222
223
224
225
220
221
22'
22.
230
23!
2J2
233
234
235
23"
m
23'
23.
240
241
242
243
244
baB :paA.
bsduscompI.: <b>sdusA: sdusB; Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. sdudpa- (td.) bsduspa, bsdu ba, sdus.
dag gi A : abbr. dagiB.
stengem. : stengs AB; cf. note 205. See also bSam gtan, et aI. bDag yig gsar bsgrigs.
nyam em. : nyaMs AB.
bcomJdan 'dascompI.: abbr. bc+doMsAB.
zhes sogs compI. : abbr. zhesoD B : ceswo A; phrase connector zhes after vowels.
ston B : (-}ston A.
dangporA: abbr. dangorB.
thugs bskyed compI. : th+ya bskyedB : abbr. abbr. thugskye A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. thugs
bskyed - 1) gzhan phan gyi sems bskyed de byang chub mchog tu sems bskyed pa.
paB: <pa>A.
grangs mcdB : grang med A; cf. Iiischke 1881: grangs med pa.
gsum compI. : abbr. JAB.
tshogs compI. : tsh+ya B : tshog A; cf. Iiischke 1881: tshogs, bsod nams kyi tshogs - accumulation of
merit acquired by virtue; tshogs gsog pa - to accumulate such.
bsagscompI.: bsag+sA: bsaDB; cf. Iiischke 1881: sogpa2. vb. (also: gsogpa, bsogpa, sogspa) pf.
(b)[sjags, fut. bsag, imp. sogs, bsag. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. tshogs gsog - dge ba sgrub pa; gsog
pa - (td.) 1. bsags pa, bsag pa, sog,' tshogs gniys bsags te rdzogs sangs rgyas; bsod nams gsog pa.
bcu gnyis compI. : abbr. bcuis AB.
mdo sde'i sde snod A : mdo 'i sde snodB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. mdo sde'i sde snod
paB: <pa>A.
legs parA : abbr.leDrB.
bsdusA: sdusB; cf. note 217.
skalB : skabs A.
bsaMs B : bsaM+sA.
chayiB: 'chi baA.
bgyidcompI.: {--}<bgyid>A: gyisB.
zhes pa ni bdag B : ces <pa ni bdag> A.
'khor B: khor A.
kyiA:om.B.
Ije rill po che em. : abbr. rinoe B : Ije A.
mngon sum compI. : abbr. mngon suMB : abbr. mngonJ A.
80
Chapter 5
ba rned cing I (47a) yid shes kyi245 dran pa'i yul (S273) 'ba' zhig tu
246
gyur tel nyin [B: dang]
rntshan
247
du gus pas bsams kyang I lung dang rtogs pa'i yon tan gyi248 pha rntha' rtogs par mi
249
nus tel
[B: mkhan chen chos rgyal bas] bstod parJ250
bshes gnyen mkha' lding dbang po mams kyis kyang I
khyod kyi
251
yon tan rntha,252 rna rnthong ba253 nal
gang gi blo gros phye rna leb lta bUSP54
de ni dpoi
55
par nus pa ga la yin
256
1
de lta na yani
58
rang gi skal ba dang 'tsham par
59
rnthong zhing thos pa'i yon tan [B: gyi] cha'i
cha tsarn sgro ' dogs
260
dang I gcam
261
bu spangs
262
nas gus pas brjod par bgyicf
63
nal
[2.4 Verse 4]
[4] thub bstan nub khar
64
dar zhes gsungs
265
pa'i doni
bstan pa'i rnjui
66
'dir skyes chen khyod byon nasi
lta dpyod nyams len mam dag spella dgongsl
rgyal bas lung bstan khyod la phyag 'tshallo
267
II
245
246
247
24'
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
shes kyi comp!. : shes+yiB : shes kyis A; since gYUI'is past of the intransitive verb 'gJl7.lF pa.
tuB: duA.
mtshan A : abbr. man[tsa rtagsJB.
yon tan gyi compl. : y+ton+yiB : abbr. y+ton gyi A.
miA:maB.
bstodparA: abbr. bstodrB.
khyod kyi A : abbr. khyod+yiB.
mtha' A : mkha' mtha 'B.
baA: om.B.
Ita bus compl. : abbr. /tus AB.
dpog A : dpoDB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. dpog pa - (td.) dpags pa, dpag pa, dpogs.
yinB: yodA.
ees so compl. : abbr. eeso A : abbr. zheso B.
de Ita nayangB : de Ita na'ang A; cf. Jiischke 1881: de, de Ita, de ltar (-du, or-na), de'ang, deyang.
Illuminator, s.y. de Ita na- being like that; de lIar yang- meaning: de ltar yin na yang- although it is
like this. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. delta na -de 'drayin tshe'am, de 'drayin na;Tshig mdzod chen
mo, s.v. de lIar-de 'dra ba dang de 'dra Ita bur; Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.V. de lIar yang-de 'drared
kyang, de lIar yin na yang.
Jiischke 1881: 'tsham(s) pa- fit, suitable, in a c c o d a n c ~ to, in conformity with.
'dogscompl.: 'doDB: 'dogpaA; cf. Jiischke 1881: sgro, sgro 'dogs geodpa;Tshig mdzod chen mo,
s.y. sgro 'dogs -medparyod 'dzin gyi kun btags.
geam em. : abbr. JcaM A : abbr. eaMB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. geam bu- 1. g.tam beos ma 'am
beos ma 'i ngo bstod
spangsB: spang A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. spong ba-I.(td.) spangspa, spang ba, spongs.
bgyidem.: bgyisA: gyiB; cf. note 239.
kharA: karB.
zhesgsungscompl.: zhesgsung+sA: abbr. zhesllngsB.
mjugA: jugB; cf. note 28; Jiischke 1881: jug-sometimes for mjug.
phyag 'Ishallo campI. : abbr. phyag 'tshalo A : phy[tsa rtagsJa 10 B.
Text Edition
81
zhes
268
pa nil mdo lasl mar me 'chi khar gsal
269
ba Itarl nga'i bstan pa nub khar darl zhes
270
lung
bstan pa'i dgongs pa ni27l1 yang snyigs272 bstan pa'i mjug273 'dir mkhas shing grub pa brnyes
274
pa'i skyes chen khyed byon nasi Ita ba dang spyod pa nyams len rnam par dag pa'i sgo nasi
.. sangs rgyas kyi bstan pa dar zhingl rgyas par mdzad pa la dgongs pa yin tel de'i rgyu mtshan
275
. sngar gangs
276
ri'i khrod 'dir mkhas pa'i dbang po mang du byon na yang I 'ga' zhig gis277Ita
. ba'i cha de khonagsal bar278 (5b)mdzadl 'ga' zhig gis spyod pa'iphyogs de
279
khonagsal bar2
80
mdzadl 'ga' zhig gis281 nyams len gyi gnad
282
kho na gsal bar mdzad pa tsam du zad [B: kyis]1
bshad Sgrub
283
gnyis ka'i sgo nas bstan pa gsal bar mdzad pa khyod las sngar gzhan
284
ma byung
bar mthong zhing thos pas khums [B: shing]1 phyis kyang mi (8274) 'byung stel
[2.4.1]
dag nyid chen po'i gsung lasl
(1) (M222a3) mang pos bkur bas chen pOi
85
grags rnams kyang I
myed dang bkur sti grags pa lhui
86
byed kyil
sangs rgyas bstan pa ched cher mi ' dzin287 na!
(47b) 'di na thub bstan gees 'dzin dam pa sui
268
269
27.
271
272
273
274
275
27'
m
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
zhes B : ces A.
khar gsal em. : khar bsal A : kar gsalB; cf. Jaschke 1881: 'chi ba, compo 'chi kha, 'chi khar.
khar dar zhcs em. : khar dar ces A : kar dar zhcs B.
niB :yinA.
snyigscompl.: snyiDB: myig+sA; cf. Jaschke 1881: snyigspa, Cs. snyigsma
mjugem. : 'jug AB.
bmycs B : mnycs A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. grub bmycs - grub pa thob pa stc sngags lugs kyi
grub pa 'i dngos grub brgyad gang nmg sogs thob pa 'i mal 'byor pa.
rgyumtshan A : abbr. rgyun[tsartagsJB.
gangs B : gang+s A.
zhig gis compl. : abbr. zhigis AB.
gsal barA: abbr. gsalrB.
spyodphyogspa'ideem.: spyodpa'iphyogdeA: dpyodpa'iphyoDB.
barA :parB.
zhig gis compl. : abbr. zhigis B : zhig+si A.
gnadB : cha A.
sgrub B : bsgrub A.
sngar gzhan B : gzhan sngar A.
chcnporA: abbr. chenorB.
myed dang bkur sti grags pa lhurcompl. : abbr. myedang bkur sti grags pa lhur M : mycdang bskur sti
grags pa lhur A : bmyedang bkur sti graD pa lhur B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. mycd bkur - myed
pa dang bkursti ste, norrdzas 'buJ mtshon dang, bkurstigus 'dud Mvy, S.V. 183 bkursti, 1750 bkur
stirbyedpa/bya ba (satkara);Jaschke 1881: skurbaIT. pf. ft. & imp. bskur. Jaschke 1881: bkur ba I.
1. vb. to honour, esteem (synon. mchod pa), mang pas bkur ba'i rgyal po, mahiisammata, the Icing
honoured by many, frq.; 2. sbst. honour; more frq., bkur sti, honour, respect, homage, mark of honour.
Jaschke 1881: lhur, with len pa or bycd pa C. acc. to apply one's self to, bestow pains upon = don
gnycr byed pa.
ched cher mi 'dzin BM : ched chcr mi mdzin A; cf. Jiischke 1881: chcd, as sbst. of rare occurence,
Schr.: reason, signification = don; Sch.: ched chen po a great thing, an important business or affair.
LN: wrong spelling of chcs; Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. chcs - ha cang ngam shin ta, ... slab pa chcs
chcr rgan pa. Jiischke 1881: ches 2. pf. of che ba, as adv. very. Nitartha, S.V. ches cher- ever greater,
greatly, widely, very much.
82
Chapter 5
(2) mkhas rlom phal cher smra mkhan ne tso288 bzhin!
tshig gi rjes 'brang gzhu
289
tsam klog par zadl
rigs dang mi rigs 'byed la 'thoms
290
gyur9! na!
, di na rigs
292
Idan legs bshad smra ba
293
gang I
(3) nyin dang mtshan du mal 'byor
94
sgOm'-95 mams kyani
96
I
!hag spyod kyis ni
297
ting , dzin bsgoms
298
pa bzhinl
yang dag Ita ba'i gnad kyis dben gyur na!
, di na yang dai
99
lam zhugs sgrub
300
po medl
(4) Ito phyir rab byung gral pyhir bsnyen rdzogs
30
! kyang I
tshulldan bslab la
302
gus pa'i dge sbyong nyung I
kye rna kye
303
hud sakya'i
304
bstan pa nil
ming tsam Ius par0
5
kho b0
306
gcig pus mthong I zhes
307
dang /
blo bzant08 bstod parP09
288
2"
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
mkhan ne tso B : mkhan ne tsho A : lnkhas ne tsho M; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. smra mkhan ne
tso -mi skad shes pa'i ne tso; J1ischke 1881: ne tso-parrot.
gzhu A : gzhu{4} M : gzhung B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. gzhu - 1) mda' stan; Tshig mdzod
chen mo, s.y. mda' stan- (mngon) gzhu.
rigs dang mi rigs 'byed la 'thoms compl. : riD dang mi riD 'byed la 'thoMs B : rig dang mi rig 'byed
la 'thoMs A : rigs dang mi rigs 'thoms M; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. 'byed pa (td.) phye ba, dbye
ba,phyes I) kha 'phral ba;Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. 'thomspa- (tmd.) mgo ba 'kharba.
J1ischke 1881: 'gyur ba 1. Yb. pf. gyur (-ta, -pa) imp. gyur (-cig), cf. sgyur ba, 2. to become.
Cf. J1ischke 1881: rigs can, rigs ldan- of noble birth. Lit. 'of good family' (Skt. kulika).
baAB :paM.
mal 'byarcompl. : abbr. mar AB.
sgaMB : bsgam M : bsgaMs A, cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. sgam pa - 1. (td.) bsgams pa, bsgam
pa,sgams.
mams kyangcompl. : maMs kyang A : maMs+yang B.
kyis ni= emphatic particle; cf. Hodge (1993:27-29).
ting 'dzin bsgams M : abbr. tingin sgaMs B : abbr. tingni sgaM A.
yang dag A : abbr. yangg B.
zhugs sgrubM: zhuDsgrubB: zhug bsgrllbA; cf: Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. }ugpa2. (tmd.) zhugs
pa, }ug pa, zhugs - des sa 'brang ba dang 'gra ba; LN: sgrub pa = sgrub pa pa. Tshig mdzod chen
mo, s.y. sgrub pa pa 2) chas sgrub mkhan. Skt. sadhaka. MW, s.v. sadhaka - adept, an efficient or
skillful person, magician.
bsnyen rdzogs AM : snyen rdzaDB; cf. Mvy, s.Y. 8715 bsnyen parrdzags (pa) upasatpanna.
tshulldan bslab la M : abbr. tshuldan bslab la B : tshulldan bslab pa A.
kyeA: kyiB.
shAkya'iBM : shakya<'>i A.
Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.Y.luspa -(tmd.) ma tshang ba'am chadpa.
par kha ba M : abbr. pa khau B : abbr. par khall{-} A.
zhes BM : ces A.
bla bzangcompl. : abbr. <blazang> A: <bla> B.
Source: dPalldan bla ma dam pa ku ma ra ma ti'i yan tan rjes su dran nas cung zad bstad pa, in Tsang
kha pa 'i bka' 'bwn thar bu, gSung 'bum, vol. kha, p. 6b2-3. See also bio bstad parp. 92, 97. Cf. Toh.
5274 (4) A eulagy ta Klimaramati, the chief teacher afTsangkhapa.
Text Edition 83
kIu Sgrub
310
thogs rned
311
gnyis kyi
312
bzhed pa'i lugs/313
ji bzhin thugs su chud nas
314
brtse ba yisl
skyon bral gsung gi[B: gsang ba]legs 'dorns pas
315
1
bstan pa'i gnad la nges pa ster ba ~ d i l
khyod kyi rjes su bstan las
316
gzhan su zhig ces soil
[2.5 Verse 5]
[5] bsams bzhin srid bzhes
317
chos ldan rigs su 'khrungsl
bstan pa'i sgor zhugs
318
yongs 'dzin mkhas (6a) rnang bstenl
sdorn pa gsum blangs srog las
319
gees par bzunt
20
I
,thub pa'i ring lugs khyod la phyag 'tshalloll
[2.5.1]
zhes pa ni32l1 bdag nyid chen po 'di sku tshe snga rnar
322
kha cher PaI).Qi ta don yod rdo rjel zhes
bya bar sku 'khrungs nasi chos rje blo bzang grags pa paI).gi ta rna ti bha dra2
23
gyur (8275) pas
gtso rndzad gdul bya bsam gyis
324
mi khyab pa la chos sde snod gSum/
325
rgyud sde bzhi'i spyi
326
don phyin ci rna log par bstan nasi bstan pa dang sems can
327
gyi328 don rgya chen po rndzad
tshull gsang bdag gis phyag rdar grub thob
329
la gsungs
330
pa yinl
331
310
3ll
312
3I3
31.
315
316
317
31'
319
320
32I
322
323
32.
m
326
327
328
329
330
33I
sgrubB: grubAB.
thogs med compl. : thaD medB : mthog med A; cf. Mvy, s.v. 3477 'phags pa thogs med Aryasanga.
kyiB :niA.
Note that Tsong kha pa, bKa' 'bum thor bu, vol. kha, p. 6b2 reads gzhunginstead of lugs.
Ibid reads gsa! bar gzigs nasinstead of thugs su chud nas.
gsang ba legs 'daMs pas compl. : gsang ba leD 'daMs pas B : legs 'daMs pas A (metre uncomplete,
two syllables missing). The two syllables missing im ms. A can be suplemented by the scribe in ms.
B or stem from an intermediate version. For example Tsong kha pa, bKa' 'bum thor bu, vol. kha, p.
6b2 reads gsung gis gzhan la instead of gsung gi [B: gsang baJ
las A : la B; cf. Tsong kha pa, bKa' 'bum thor bu, vol. kha, p. 6b2: las.
bzhes B : bzhin A; cf. p. 69, verse 5.
zhugscompl. : zhuDB : zhug A; cf. Jiischke 1881: sgo, bdagchos sgor jugpazhu-I beg to allow us
to enter religion, to receive us as students or disciples; jug pa L pf. and imp. zhugs.
srog las B : srogs pas A.
bzung B : gzung A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'dzin pa - (td.) bzung ba, gzung ba, zung; cf. note
35.
zhespaniB: cespa 'diA.
marA :maB.
drar B : trar A.
gyiscompl.: gy+si A: gyiB; cf. Jiischke 1881: bsam, bsamgyis mi khyab pa.
chos sde snod gsum compl. : abbr. chosde snod gsuM A : abbr. chos sde snod 3 B.
spyi A; om. B. .
sems can compl. : abbr. seMn AB.
gyiB: kyiA.
grub thob A : abbr. gruob B.
gsungs em : gsung+s A : gs+ya B.
For the source of this quotation see Las chen (2003: 615.6-19).
84 Chapter 5
[2.5.2]
de nas bsams bzhin du gangs ri'i killod 'dir Ita spyod nyams len phyin ci loi
32
tu sPyod pa
mams tshar bead pa'i phyirl bod kyi rdo rje gdan dpalldan *sa skya
333
dang nye ba na
334
1 red
mda'335 khab soy336'grags pa derl chos rgyal srong btsan
337
sgam po'i nang blon! blon po mgar
stong btsan
338
yul srungs
339
kyi brgyud
340
(48a) pal yab red mda'i
341
blon chen bkra shiS
342
rgyal
mtshan
343
dangl yum lhag bsam roam par dag pa bram ze ma gsa! ba'i tshul khrirns dang tshul
mtshungs
344
pa ye shes kyi mkha' 'gro ma
345
[B: slon
346
10 dbang phyug skyid
347
] zhes bya
348
ba
gnyis kyi sras SU
349
gyur tel lhums su zhugs pa'i tshe yum la nyi zla
350
shar ba dang I sgron me
spar ba35l dang I gtsug lag khang bzhengs p ~ 5 2 sogs rmi
353
ltas bzang po mang po byung zhing!
Ius sdug bsngal
354
dang brall sems bde ba dang ldan par'55 gyur toll
btsas pa'e
56
tshe na yang I yum sras gnyis ka la btsa,357 ba'i sdug bsngal dang bral bar gyur toll
[B: chos] bstod pari
332
333
334
335
336
331
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
;."
349
350
351
352
353
354
m
356
357
JogB : JogsA; cf. Jiischke 1881:phyiu ci Jog.
sa skya B : abbr. saskya A.
o Here Mang thos KIu sgrub rgya mtsho starts in his bsTan rtsis with summarizing his biography on
Red mda' ba (1993: 194.10). * Here Ye shes rgyal mtshan starts with his summary of the biography
on Red mda' ba (1990: 891.27). See aJso Las chen 2003: 611.19; 1972: yol. 2, 155a4, and 19-: 309a2.
mda'A: 'da'B.
khab sor AB. Cf. Ye shes rgyal mtshan: khang sor; NgCh: khab sor; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y.
khab so - rgyaJ po 'i mdzod khang.
btsan B : tsan A.
stong btsanem. : stongs tsan A: stong tsa B; cf. Stein (1993: 64, 120): mGar sTong tsan (btsan); Tshig
mdzod chen mo, S.Y. mgar, mgar stong btsan.
srungs A : bsrungs B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. srung ba - (td.) bsrungs pa, bsrung ba, srungs:
brgyud A : rgyudB.
mda'iA: 'da'iB.
bkrashiscompl.: abbr. bJaisAB.
rgyaJ mtshan compl. : abbr. rgyan[tsa rtags] A : abbr. <{-go-}> rgyan[tsa rtags]B.
mtshungs B : mtshung+s A.
ma B : {ba} <ma> A.
Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. sJon pa - 'I. (td.) bsJan pa, bsJan pa, sJon I) sdud pa dang sbyor ba 'am zIa
sgriJ gtong ba.
Ye shes rgyal mtshan 891: yum dbang phyug skyid Same in Las chen 1) 155a.5: abbr. yuM dbang
phyug skyid Note that Bstan 194.10-197.14 does not mention the name of the parents.
zhes bya A : abbr. zhes+ya B.
sras su A : abbr. srasu B. Note that Las chen 1)155a.6 adds after abbr. srasu; sa mo gJang Ja sku
'khrungs, cf. 2) 309a3, 3) 611.22. Differently Mang thos (1993: 194.10-13): sum stong bzhi brgya
dang brgyad cu 'das pa 'i gya gcig pa sa pho byi (spyi Jo 1348) Jo mnyam med red mda' pa chen po ...
byon. Note that Shes bya 'i gter mdzod, yol. 3, 316.15-16 adds rab byung drug pa 'i sa gJang Jo (1349),
and dates Red mda' ba's ordination in the 18th year of life 1366 (see note 405).
nyi zIa A : abbr. ny+liB.
Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. spor ba (td.) spar ba, spar ba, spor 1) 'bar bar byed pa, ... me spar ba.
bzhengs pa A : gzheng ba B; cf. Jiischke 1881: bzhengs pa pf. of bzheng ba.
m2iB : smi A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. rmi Jtas - rmi Jam bzang ngan gyi mtshan ma.
sdug bsngaJ compl. : abbr. bsduJ AB.
JdanparA: abbr. JdanrB.
Cf. liischke 1881': btsas pa Y. btsa[7 ba. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. btsa'ba 2.(tmd.) btsaspa, btsa'ba
-skyeba.
btsa'B: rtsaA.
Text Edition 85
khyod ni lurn bi tshal du
358
rgyal ba bzhin/
dri rned yum gyi lhums nas bltams
359
pa'i tshe
36
01
bsod narns phun tshogs
361
khyod sku rna (6b) bzung phyirl
tshangs dbang nyid
362
du gyur ram yang na
363
shil zhes S0
364
11
de nas ' 0 rna dang zho dang I mar gyi nying khu sogs kyis bskyed
365
bsring ste
366
1 rntshan yang
btsUll ne
367
zhes bya bar
68
gsol te
369
1 smra shes don go tshun chad
370
dkon rnchog gsurn
371
gyi
(S276) sgra thos pa' am372 rten rnthong ba na! dad cing gus pa cher skye ba
373
byung I yab yum
gnyis ka gzhon nu'i dus su
374
, das
375
shingl a ne rntshan ldan gyi mkha' , gro rna bkra shis 'bum
zhes bya basi gzhon nu nyid nas mkhas pa'i dbang po chen por gyur gyi bar du/376 zhabs tog
skyo ngal rned pam phul basi shin tu drin che gsuni
78
[A48aS: !]379 bdag nyid chen pO'i
380
'byis
pa'i dus sui a ne lags
381
1 nga yang na sa skya dpon chen gyi lag rtags
382
blangs
383
nasi bod
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368
369
370
371
372
373
374
375
376
377
378
379
380
381
382
383
lum bi tshal du em. : fuM pa'i tshal du B : abbr. luM pa'i nagsu A; deriy. LumbinI. cf. Tshig rndzod
chen rno, s.y. lum bi'i tshal- sangs rgyas shAkya thub pa 'khmngs sa'i gnas te da Ita bal yul gyi
khongs su gtogs yod
bltamsA: ltaMsB; cf. Tshig rndzod chen rno, s.y. sku bltams -sku 'khrungspa.
tsheB: tshesA; cf. Jiischke 1881: tshes-I. day ofthernonth, 2. syrnb. num.: 15.
phun tshogscornpl. : abbr. phuog[tsa rtags} A: abbr. phuongB; cf. Tshig rndzod chen rno, s.y.phun
sum tshogs pa - legs shing cha tshang ba.
nyid A : gnyidB.
naA: {-} B.
zhes so cornpl. : zheso B : ceso A; cf. Hahn (1996: 42) Indefinite particles zhig after terminal position
nga, na, ma, a: ra, la and yowels; sha is none of the ten suffixes, but i is the concluding yowel.
bskyed A : skyedB; cf. Tshig rndzod chen rno, s.y. skyed pa - (td.) bskyed pa, bskyed pa, skyed.
bsring ste A : snngs te B; cf. Tshig rndzod chen rno, s.y. sring ba - (td.) bsrings pa, bsring ba, srings.
btsun ne B : abbr. brtsuen A.
zhes bya barcornpl. : zhes <bya bar> A : abbr. zhes+ya barB.
gsol te B : bsol to A; cf. Tshig rndzod chen rno, s.y. gsol ba 1. (td.) 1) zhu ba dang 'bul ba, ... mtshan
gsol
chad A; bcadB; cf. Tshig rndzod chen rno, s.y. tshun chad - dbyemtshams nas rang ngos suphyogs
pa.
dkon mchog gsum cornpl. : abbr. dkaugsuM A: dkaug 3B.
thospa'am em.: thospa'i AB; cf. A': thospa'am.
ba B : bar A; cf. Jiischke 1881: cheF, termin. of che, cher po ba - to grow, increase; cher skye ba-
to become great, to grow up.
dus su cornpl. : abbr. dusu B : dus nas A.
'das A : bdas B.
duA: tuB.
ngal med pa em. : ngas med pa B : ngas med par A; cf. Tshig rndzod chen rno, s.y. skyo ngal - sems
skyo ba dang, Ius nga! ba.
shin tu drin che gSlmgcornpl. : shinu drin che gsung B : drin ShIn tu che gsungs {--} A.
In rns. A here a "snake stroke" (sbIlll shad) marks the insertion of an extra line <bdag nyid chen po 'di
... gsa! barbyedgsungspas> (seems. A, line 8, yigchungand also note 159).
po'iA :po 'diB.
lags em. : laAB; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.y. ane lags- term of address fornunsl paternal aunt.
rtagscornpl.: rtaDB: rtagA.
bJangs B : blang+s A.
86 Chapter 5
khams
384
bde ba la 'god/385 yang na bstan pa'i sgor zhugs
386
nasI [B: sangs rgyas kyi387] bstan pa
nyin
388
rno ltar gsal bar byed gsung basp89 a ne na reI btsun ne bl0 gros390 chel khyod kyis39 1 de
gnyis ka
392
mi ' grub par ' dug gi ham
393
pa rna che zerl de dus rntshan yang btsun ne bl0 grils
394
che2
95
grags pa [B: yang] byung I
[2.5.3]
de dus 'phags chen chos bzang dpal ba la1 skyabs ' gro sems bskyedP
96
bsnyen
397
gnas kyi sdorn
pasogs thugs rje chenpo'i chos bsk02
98
rnang duzhusl denas bdagnyid chenpo'i thugs la1 dal
'byor thob pa don dang Idan par bya ba'i phyir/bstan pa'i sgor 'jug dgongs
399
nasI gangs can gyi
ngur smrig
400
'dzin pa mams kyi gtsug gi rgyan dam par gyur pal sa bzang
401
pat}. chen pa'i
drung duJ dge bsnyen
402
dang dge tshu1
403
gyi sdorn pa dgung 10 bC0
404
brgyad pa la
405
mnos
nas/
406
(48b) rntshan yang gzhon nu bl0 gros zhes gsol/
[2.5.4]
de nas shes bya'i (7a) gnas thams cad la 'jug par byed pa'i sgol bka' spyi'i dgongs 'grel/ rgyas
pa'i bstan bcos tshad rna mam ' grella gzigs par dgongs nasI mkhas pa'i dbang po nya dbon kun
384
385
386
387
388
389
390
391
392
393
394
395
396
397
398
399
400
401
402
403
404
405
406
khams comp!. : khaMs {-} A: 'khaMs B.
Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'god pa -(td.) bkod pa, dgod pa, khod 1) 'iogpa, ... 'gro sa'i gzhung lam du
bkod pa, ... rgan rgon mams bde skyid kyi sar 'god pa.
zhugs comp!. : zhuD B : zhug A.
Cf. Ye shes rgyal mtshan: sangs rgyas kyi bstan pa; further example for indication that Ye shes rgyal
mtshan's pattern was ms. B or a text related to it, cf. note-347. '
nyin B : nyi A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. nyin mo - nam langs telag ris magon panas nyi nub lag
ds mimagon par gyur pa 'i bar.
gsung bas em. : gsung pas A : gsungs pas B.
blo gTOS comp!. : abbr. biaus B : blo bo A.
kyis B : kyi A.
kaB:gaA.
ham comp!. : {-} ham A: abbr. haMB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. ham pa 1) 'thob 'dodkyi
bmab sems2) rang tshod ma zin pa.
blogToscomp!.: abbr. biausB: blo boA.
cher B : che A.
bskyed em. : skyed AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. sems bskyed
bsnyen B : snyen A; cf. Jiischke 1881: bsnyen, bsnyen gaas - fasting, abstinence.
bskor A : skor B. Prob. abbr. of chos kyi 'khor 10 (b)skor ba; Mvy, s.y. 1308-09 chos kyi 'khor 10,
Mvy, s.y. 769 chos kyi 'khor lorab tu (b)skorba'i stobs; Jiischke 1881: 'khor losgyurba, or skorba,
with chos kyi, to tum the wheel of doctrine.
dgongs A : dgos dgongs B.
smdgB : mig A; cf. Jiischke 1881: ngur ba, ngur smdgyellowish red, saffron colour, the original
colour of the monks' habit.
sa bzang B : sa bzang+s A.
dge bsnyen comp!. : abbr. dgain AB.
dge tshU] A : abbr. dgel[tsa rtags]B.
bco B : bcwo A.
Shes bya 'i gtenndzod, yo!. 3, 316.20-21 adds: rab byung drug pa 'i me rta lor (1366).
maos nas em. : nod nas B : abbr. nos A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. nod pa I. (td.) maos pa, mao
ba, nos -len pa'am zhu ba, ... 2. (tmd.) myed pa'am thob pa.
Text Edition
87
dga' dang I lung rigs
407
smra ba'i seng ge
408
mkhan chen sangs rgyas (S277) 'phel gnyis kyi zhabs
la btug ste
409
I blo gros sbyangs pasl mam 'grella go ba tho re ba chags
410
[B: pa byung] nasi
. grwa skor
411
mdzad.pasl thugs
412
rab che ba'i grags413 pa thobl
. cle dus rgyal ba'i sras po thogs414 med bzang po dpal ba'i mtshan thos pa tsam gyis41S ba spu
g.yo zhingl mig nas
416
mchi
417
ma ' dzag
418
pa sogs byung nas4191 dngul chu'i
420
chos rdzong421 du
'.' byon tel sems dpa,422 chen po'i drung du smon 'jug sems bskyed"23 blangsl theg pa chen p0424
blo sbyong
425
la sogs pa'i chos skor
426
mang du zhusl
.denas gdan sarbyonnasl chos khri thang du Ian 'debs gcig mdzad pasl gzhung la sbyorba bde
bsang
427
ba gcig rna 'khod pa [B: la]1 grwa skor
428
bas ma shes na'ang I khong pa rang la rang
gis429 thugs
430
shin tu khral
431
ba gcig byung nasi mam ' grel gyi gzhung kho rang
432
ci zer shes
pa gcig ma byung na! slob dpon gyi
433
ngag rgyun gyis slu
434
bar 'dug dgongs nasi sa skyar dpe
407
-.<108
_ 409
410
411
412
413
414
415
416
417
,418
41.
420
,421
422
423
424
425
42.
427
428
429
430
431
432
433
- 434
rigsem.: rigAB.
seng ge compl. : abbr. senge B : dbang po A.
btugsteA: btuD teB; cf. Jiischke 1881: btugpay. gtugpa. Jiischke 1881: gtugpa,pf. gtugs, also btug
pa, cognate to thug pa. Lit. zhabs la gtug pa - to touch the feet of s.o.
chagscompl.: chaDB :chagA.
g:rwa skor B : gra bskor A.
thugscompl.: thuDB: thugA.
gragscompl.: graDB: gragA.
thogscompl.: thoDB: thogA.
gyisA: laB.
nasA; om.B.
mchiB: 'chi A; cf. Jiischke 1881: mchi ma, resp. spyan chab.
'dzag B : mdzag A; cf. Jiischke 1881: 'dzag pa, mchi ma gzag. Tshig mdzod chen mo; s.y. 'dzag pa
(tmd) zag pa, 'dzag pa - 'bab pa 'am, Jhung ba, 'dzir ba, ... chu 'dzag pa, ... thig Ie 'dzag pa, ... mchi ma
'dzag pa. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. gzag pa - gzags pa'i da Ita ba dang ma 'ongs pa 'j 'bri tsul gzhan
zhig.
nasB: steA.
dnguJ chu 'j A : sngul chu)iB.
Cf. TBRC code 0223: chos rdzong- seat resp. hermitage of dNgnl chu.
sems dpa' compl. : abbr. seMda' AB.
bskyed compl. : <b>skyed A : skyedB; cf. note 396.
chenpocompl.: chenpo<{-}>A: abbr. chenoB.
sbyong B : sbyongs A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. blo sbyong - sems la 'dris par byed pa.
skorB: bskorA; cf. note 398,1179,2093,2129.
bsangem. : sang A : sarB; cf. Jiischke 1881: pf. (b)sangs, 1. to do away with, to remoye (dirt) etc., to
cleanse. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. bsang ba (td.) bsangs pa, bsang ba, songs 2) sel ba (Skt. apoha).
MW, s.y. apoha-pushing away, remoYing, (in disputation) reasoning, argne, denying.
grwa skor B : gra bskor A.
gis em. : giAB; rang la rang gis = rang rang gis?
thu$Scompl.: thuDB: thugA.
khral em. : khrel AB; thugs khraJ, (h) sems kbraL
rang A: rang {gil B.
slob dpon gyi em. : abbr. slon dpon+yiB : abbr. slob dpono gyi A.
sluB: bsluA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. slu ba- (td.) bsluspa, bslu ba, slus- 'dridpa'am 'brid
pa dang mgo skor gtong ba.
88
Chapter 5
mtshams
435
bead [B: nas]1 gzhung la rgya
436
cher bcug [B: tel] sde bdun mdo 'grel pa 'grel bshad
dang bcas pa [B: la
437
] gzigsl mkhyen rab
438
[B: kyi439] dbang phyug sa skya pat;t<;li t ~ dangl 'u
yug pa rigs440 pa'i seng ge'i legs bshadmams la'ang gzigs4411 slob dpon442 che chung
443
gnyis la
chos mang du gsan pasl sde bdun dgongs 'grel dang bcas pa'i don phyin ci ma log par
444
thugs
SU
445
chud nasi mkhas (7b) pa'i grags pas sa steng
446
khyab par447 gyur tel mam 'grella 'grel pa
che chung gnyisl spyi don dang bcas pa mdzad nasi
(1) gang gi legs bshad tsha zer pbra mos kyang I
mkhas rlom me khyer bye ba'i gzi 'pbrog
448
(49a) cing I
(S278) rigs449 tshul 'bum pbrag stong gi zer 'pbro ba'il
blo gros 'di ni sngon med nyi rna yin!
(2) kun gzhi'i rungal nas
450
thon
451
pa'i sa bon mamsl
shes rab yurn gyis
452
legs bskrun
453
brtson 'grus kyil
rna rnas rgyun dU
454
bskyangs
455
pas gangs can 'dir456 I
dpalldan grags pa'i gdung tshob kho bo 'khrungsl
(3) de lta na yang gangs ri'i khrod 'di rul
mkhas nnongs 'byed pa'i: tshulla rni mkhas pas
457
I
435
436
437
438
439
440
441
442
443
444
445
446
447
448
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
456
457
dpe mtshams em. : dpe' 'tshaMs A : dpe 'tshaMs B; cf Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. dpe mtshams pa -
mtshams la bshad de dpe tshig blo la 'dzin mkhan dang, don la dog dpyod byed mkhan.
rgya em. : brgyaAB. Jiischke 1881: brgya- often erron for rgya. Jiischke 1881: rgya2. extend, width,
size; rgya cheradv. = rgyas par in detail, at large, at full length.
la B : am. A. Note: Las chen 1) 155b.3 same as B: lao
rab B : rabs A; cf note 189.
kyiB : om. A. Note: Las chen 1) I 55b.4 same as B: kyi.
rigs A : rig B.
la 'ang gzigs em. : la yang gz+yiB : la 'ang gzig A.
slob dpon compI. : abbr. slaun AB.
che chung A : abbr. cheung B.
logparcompI.: abbr.logrB: logpaA.
thugs su compI. : abbr. thugsu A : abbr. th+ya su B.
steng em. : stengs AB; cf. Jaschke 1881: steng, sa steng thams cad-the whole face of the earth; Tshig
mdzod chen mo, S.V. sasteng- 1) sagzhi'i sgang2) sagsum gyi yagyal zhig stemi'j jig den.
khyab parcompI. : abbr. khyabr B : khyabs par A.
'phrog B : 'phroD A. cf Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. 'phrog pa - 1. (td.) phrogs pa, 'phrog pa, phrogs
- dbang dang btsan thabs kyis len pa dang 'lamps pa.
rigsem.: rigAB.
nasA: lasB.
than em. : thorn} A : thos B. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. 'than pa (tmd.) than pa, 'than pa, than 3)
'char ba, ... zhing kha 'i nang nas son gyimyu gu 'than nyer 'dug.
gYlS B : gyi A.
bskrun B : skrun A; Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. skrun pa - (td.) bskrunpa, bsknmpa, skrun -gsardu
'dzugs pa dang bzo ba.
duB: tuA.
bskyangs A : skyangs B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. skyong ba - (td.) bskyangs pa, bskyang ba,
skyongs.
'dirB: 'diA.
pasB :pa'iA.
Text Edition
nya pa'i
458
lag tu rin chen 'brim
459
pa ltarl
blo ngan 'tshong bya'i
460
tshogs dang mnyam du spell
(4) Sgrub
461
dang sUn 'byin rigs
462
.pa'i mche Ider
463
gyisl
phas rgol glang po'i klad
464
pa 'gems nus kyang I
legs nyes 'byed pa'i gzu bOS
465
dben pas nal
smra ngan wa skyes tshogs kyang rtag tu rgoll zhes gsungs
466
shing I
bstod par/
467
(l)rigs
468
tshul brgya phrag du ma'i ro ldan pa'i!
blo chen ldan mams dga' ba skyed
469
byed pal
roam ' grel mdzad pa'i thun mong
470
min pa'i lugsl
yongs su rdzogs par smra ba khyod du basi zhes
471
dang I
(2) sde bdun
472
ral pam 'thug pos gnya' khebs cing (
mdo' yi474 stobs rgyas 'grel bshad so SO'i
475
khyogsl
nyid kyi shes rab ngan pa'i glang 'phen pal
tshad ma ri bo'i sul na rgyu ba lagsl
[2.5.5]
89
de nas bdag nyid chen po desl mngon par rtogs pa'i
477
rim pa gtso bor ston pal sa bcu'i dbang
phyug rgyal tshab byams pa mgon pO'i
478
gsung
479
mngon par rtogs pa'i rgyan 'grel pa (8a) dang
458
459
460
461
462
463
464
465
466
467
468
469
470
471
472
473
474
475
47.
477
478
479
pa'iB : ba 'i A. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. nya pa - nya 'dzin mkhan.
'bdm em.: 'grim A: 'griMs B; cf. Iiischke 1881: 'bdm pa, L vb., pf. bdm(s) 1. to distribute, deal out,
hand round.
'tshongbya'iem.: 'chingbya'iB: 'tshongbu'iA.
sgrub B : bsgrubs A.
rigs em. : rig AB.
lderem. : sdcr AB.
kladB : gladA; cf. Iaschke 1881: klad;hence kladpa, also glad; Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. kladpa
-1) mgo'ikladpa.
bas B : b+so A. cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gzu bo - 1. mod gJeng bar 'dum byed mkhan.
zhes gsungs comp!. : abbr. zhesungs B : ces gsungs A.
Source: dPalldan blama dampakumiirama ti'iyon tan Ijessu dran nas cung zad bstodpa, in Tsang
kha pa 'i bka' 'bum thor bu, gSung 'bum, vo!. kha, p. 6a6-6b 1. Cf. Toh. 5274 (4) A eulogy to Kumiira-
mati, the chiefteacher ofTsongkhapa.
rigsem.: rigAB.
skyedB : bskyed A; cf. note 365.
thunmongcomp!.: abbr. thuongB: thunmongsA.
zhes B : ces A.
sde bdun A : sde <chos> bdun B.
ralpaB: ralpa {---} A; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. raJpa-1) skraringpo,. .. seng ge'iralpa.
,riB: 'iA. .
so so 'i comp!. : abbr. sau''i A : abbr. swo'iB.
zhes so comp!. : abbr. zheso B : abbr. 'ceso A.
Cf. Iiischke 1881: rtogs pa, mngon par rtogs pa (abhisamaya).
mgon po 'i comp!. : abbr. mgaun 'i AB.
gsung B : gsungs A.
90 Chapter 5
bcas pa la gzigs par dgongs nasi phar phyin gyi gzhung spar
480
rna gcig dbu
481
mgas SU
482
bcug
stel gzims483 pa'i mtshan lam dul rgya gar skad nas rdzogs so'i bar gzhung rna Ius pa 'bur du
dod pa (8279) phyag gis484 bzung
485
nyan pa byung I re re nas blangs nasi zhal du gsol basi ro
mchog dang ldan pa byung zhingl nmal
486
sad pa dang I shin tu dgyes par gyur nasi de ring [B:
ngas] ji tsam zin Ita dgongs487 nas bzung
488
basi bam po [B: dang po] che ba 'phyi
489
la zin pa
490
byung gsungsl gzhung thugs su (49b) chud pa dang I lung chos kyi go ba dpe cha ba
491
chags
492
pa byung na yang I shin tu
493
mkhas pa cig
494
byed dgongs nasi skye dgu'i gtsug rgyan chos kyi
rje dpalldan bla ma
495
dam pa bsod nams rgyal mtshan la sogs pa yongs ' dzin dam pa mams la
gsan zhing496 I khyad par du
497
nyi khri snang ba dang I brgyad stong , grel chen la sogs498 pa
rgya 'grel mams dang I 'bre
499
~ o o gyi 'grel bshad la
501
sogs bod 'grel mams la gzigs pasl
'phags
502
seng gnyis kyi dgongs pa phyin ci rna log pa
503
thugs su chud nasi phar phyin gyi
tIkii
504
sbyor tlk
505
don bdun CU
506
mams mdzad del
480
481
482
483
484
485
486
487
488
489
490
491
492
493
494
495
496
497
498
499
500
501
502
503
504
505
506
sparA : parB; d. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. spar ma -par ma dang 'dra; Jiischke 1881: par, parma
- a printed work.
dbu B : dbus A.
mgas su comp!. : abbr. mgasu A : abbr. sngasu B.
gzims B : gzim A.
phyaggiscomp!.: abbr.phyagisA: om. B.
bzung A : zung B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'dzin pa - (td.) bzung ba, gzung ba, zung.
mnal A : malB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. mnal- gnyid kyi zhe sa, ... mtshan mor mna/ du song
ba, ... mna1 sad pa.
dgongs A : dgos dgongs B.
bzung B : gzung A.
che ba 'phyi comp!. : che <ba> 'phyi A : tsha phyiB. Cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'phyi ba 1. (tmd.)
'phyis pa, 'phyi ba - dus tshod 'gyang ba.
pa B : (-}pa A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. zin pa 2) ... 2. tshar ba 'i don ston rags byed pa 'i tshig
grogsshig.
dpe cha ba em. : eha pe ba A : eha ze ba B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. dpe eha ba - gzhung lugs
la thos bsam byed mkhan.
chags comp!. : B: eh+ya: chag A.
tuA: om.B.
cigcomp!. : abbr. 1 A : om. B.
maB: <ma>A.
zhing B : cing A.
khyad par du comp!. : abbr. khyadr du A : abbr. khyadr B.
la sogscomp!.: abbr.laswoA: loDB.
'bre B: 'gre A.
Note that Las chen 1) 156.1,2) 309b2 and 3) 612.18 wrongly state marinstead of ar, while mss. A and
B correctly state ar. For more details see English translation.
laA: om. B.
'phagscomp!.: 'phaDB: 'phagA.
paB :parA.
TIkA em. : TikaAB.
T1kem. : Tik A: Tig B; Tibetan abbr. for f[kif.
eu em. : beu AB.
Text Edition 91
(1) tshig gi
507
rjes 'brang byis pa'i b10 can mamsl
sng
on
rabs bshad srol bzlas
508
pas rngu509 na yang I
'bras rned sbun
510
pa 'phyar ba ngal rnthong nasi
gzhan zer mam grangs zio ba
511
kho bos spangsl
(2) spyi don gzhung brgya'i tshul dang mi 'gal zhing I
tshig don dngos stobs rigs
512
pas sgrub513 pa Ial
rokhas dorn mngon pa'i nga rgyal can mams kyisl
yun ring
514
brtags
515
kyang klan ka'i
516
skabs rned doll zhes gsungs
517
I
goD. byo nyi rnas
518
bstod pari
(8b) 'phags pa'i
519
bzhed gzhung rna Ius gzhan dag kyang f20
Ian re tsam gyis rna Ius rnthar phyin phyirl
rang dang gzhan gyi grub rntha' rgya rntsho yi/
pha rol son pa'i go 'phangs
521
bmyes
522
pa (8280) yin! zhes S0523 II
[2.5.6]
de nas bdag nyid chen po des
524
chos thams cad kyi rna rno mngon pa'i sde snod Ia gzigs par
dgongs nasi gnas lnga rig pa'i p a r : t ~ H ta chen po byang chub rtse rno'i zhabs Ia btug ste
525
I
mngon pa gong' og tshar mang du gsan zhinlf26 I rgyas pa'i bstan bcos sa sde lngal bsdus pa'i
507
508
509
510
5Il
512
513
514
515
516
517
518
519
520
521
522
523
524
525
526
tshig gi compl. : abbr. tshigiB : tshigs gi A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. tshig.
bzlasA: zlasB. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. zlo ba (td.) bzlaspa, bzla ba, zlos 1) yang yang 'donpa.
mgu B : 'gu A; cf. Iiischke 1881: 'go ba, incorr. for mgu ba; mgu ba - to rejoice, to be glad, joyful,
content. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. mgu ba - (trod.) yid!shims pa'am yi rang pa.
Iiischke 1881: sbuupay. spuupa;spuupa 1. sbst., also sbuupa, chaff, husks.
zlo ba em. : bzlos pa AB; cf. note 508.
rigs em. : rig AB; cf. note 40.
sgrub em. : sgrubs B : bsgrubs A; cf. note 461.
ringB : rings A; cf. Iiischke 1881: yuu,yuuringpo.
brtags compl. : brtaDB : brtag A; see Iiischke 1881: bmg(s) pa y. rtog pa; as sbst., preceeded by a
genit.
ldanka'iem. : glan dga'iA: gIanka'iB; cf. Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.y. ldanka -snyad ka'am, rtsod
gzhi. Iiischke 1881: ldan ka 1. censure, blame.
zhesgsuugscompl.: zhesuugsB: cesgsuugsA.
gon byo nyi mas compl. : <gon byo nyi mas> AB.
'phags pa 'i A: 'phags pa 'i yuf gyiB.
'phags pa 'i bzhed gzhuug ma Ius gzhan dag kyang em.: 'phags pa 'i yuf+yi bzhed gzhuug gzhan dag
kyang B: 'phags pa 'i bzhed gzhuug [xx] gzhan dag kyang A. Perhaps in both patterns from which the
scribes of mss. A and B copied their texts were missing two syllables. While this corruption (Korrup-
tel) has been cured by conjecture in ms. B, ms. A still omits two of nine syllables. Emendation
according to Sangs rgyas rtse mo IBA 2003: 276.6): <ma Ius>.
'phangem.: 'phangsAB; Iiischke 1881: go, go 'phang(s);Tshig mdzod chenmo, S.Y. go 'phang. See
also bSam gtan, et aI. bDag yig gsar bsgrigs.
bmyesB : mnyes A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. bmyespa - (trod.) rtogs pa dang chen po 'i gnas
thob pa ... go 'phang bmyes pa.
zhes so compl. : abbr. zheso B : abbr. ceso A.
des B : de A; dgongs pa is a transitiye yerb.
btugsteem. : btugteA: btuD teB; cf. Iiischke 1881: gtugpa, pf. gtugs, also btugpa, cognate to thug
pa.
zhingem.: cingAB.
92 Chapter 5
bstan beos sdorn mam gnyisl pra ka ra [B: l}.a] sde brgyad ' grel pa ' grel bshad dang beas pa la
gzigs shingl mkhas pa'i dbang po dpang
27
10 tstsha ba528 blo gros bstan
529
pa'i 'grel bshacP
30
la
gzigs pasl thogs rned sku rnehed kyi dgongs pa (50.) phyin ei rna log pa thugs suo ehud liasl
nmgon pa gong
53l
'og gi iT kii
532
bsdus don dang beas pa rndzad del mkha' 'gro'i dbang po
mkha' la spyod pa'i rntshan rna rjes su rnthong gyur nasi 'dab rna shin tu rgyas pa min pa'ang
de'i
533
rjes su slob pa !tarl blo gros stobs ldan sngon rabs
534
mkhas pa'i rjes su 'brang
35
nas
bshad pa lal phrag
36
dog sgo nas srnod par byed kyang 'di la pa eung zad med/ ees
gsungsl
bl0
538
bstod pari
stobs beu nmga' ba thub pa'i ring lugs pa
539
I
mam rig shing rta'i srol 'byed ' dzam gling rgyan/
gang gis
540
bde bar gshegs pa'i gdung 'tshob
54l
pal
thogs
542
rned sku rnehed gnyis kyi bzhed pa'i lugsl
ji bzhin thugs su ehud pa'ang khyod du
[2.5.7]
de nas bdag nyid chen po des
545
1 bstan pa'i bya ba yongs su rdzogs pa dge slong
46
gi sdorn pa
nmos
547
nasi' dul ba'i bslab bya phyin ci (9.) rna log par
48
nyams su len pa'i srol gtOd
549
[B: dgos
STI
52'
52.
530
531
5J2
533
534
535
53.
537
538
53.
54.
541
542
543
544
545
54.
547
548
54.
dpang A : spang B.
See English translation.
bstan A : brtan B.
'gJ-e1 bshad A: abbr. leD bshad soDB. Note that Las chen agrees with ms. B: leD bshad, see I) 156a4,
2) 309b4, 3) 613.2.
gong B : gongs A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gong 'og - gong dang gsham mam steng 'og.
TlkAem.: TlkaB: TikaA.
de'iA: deyiB.
rabsB: rabA; cf. Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.v. sngonrabs-sngargyi byungrabs.
'brang A: 'brangs B; cf. note 507.
phragem. : phra AB.
nyesB: ny+seA.
blo compl. : <blo> AB.
lugs pa compl. : IuD pa B : lug+s la A; cf. p. 97.
gisB :phyirA; cf. below: p. 97.
'tshob A : tshob B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gdung 'tshob 2) rigs dang Iud kyi rgyud 'dzin
mkhan.
thogscompl.: thoDB: thogA.
khyod du bas- according to GTN: khyed rang red or, almost: khyed rang ma gtogs mi 'dug.
zhes so compl. :. zheso B : ceso A. This verse matches partly with a verse in Ye shes rgyal mtshan
901.2-6 and with a verse below. See blo bstodparp. 97. Similar to a verse in dPaJ ldan biama dampa
ku mil ra ma ti'i yon tan Ijes su dra.n nas cung zad bstod pa, in Tsong kha pa, bKa' 'bum thor bu, vol.
kha, p. 6bl-2. Cf. Toh. 5274 (4) A el/logy to Kumilramati, the chiefteacher ofTsongkhapa.
des B : d+se A.
dgeslongcompl.: abbr. dgJeongAB.
mnos em. : nod AB.
10gparA: 10grB.'
gtod em. : bstod AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sIOI gtod - srol 'byed dang don gcig; sIOI 'byed
1) lugs srol gsar du 'byed pa.
Text Edition
93
par] dgongs nasi gnas brtan dgra bcompa chen pol Idog
550
lhodpamkhan chen
55l
kun(S281) dga'
dpal bzang po'i drung du byon nasi mkhan slob dge 'dun dang bcas pa'i spyan sngar bsnyen
rdzogs kyi sdom pa mnos
552
nasi 'dul ba mdo rtsa tshar gcig gsan pasl mkhan chen pa la yang
thugs bskyed thon pa byung I Ita khrid kyang zhusl chos grol ba dang I mkhan chen pas bya
bur
553
gcig gnang nasi khyed skyes stobs kyi thugs
554
rab che zhing I gzhung lugs gzhan la [B:
'ang] sbyangs pa'i stobs kyisl 'dul ba la yang nged
555
pas khyed shin tu mkhas pa cig byung
gda'0
556
11
chos bdag po la 'phrod lags soil
'dl la khyed kyis 11 ka
557
gcig [B: kyang] mdzad d0
558
1/
bstod 'dul gyi sdom brgyud
559
'di rna chad
560
pa gcig 'tshalloll
zhes
56l
gsung ba'i
562
zhal ta
563
bzang po gnang ba dang du blangs te
564
1 'dul ba
565
lung dang rgya
'grel mams dang /byakhyi sog gsum sogs566 bod kyi 'grel bshad mams la gzigs pas/yon Siik
567
(50b) mam gnyis kyi dgongs pa phyin ci rna loi
68
pa thugs su chud cing I mdo rtsa [B: ba]'i 11
ka
569
dang I las chog gnyis mdzad nasi de phyin chad' chad nyan mdzad dus kyang I dbyar gnas
dang gso sbyong [B: dang] dgag dbye sogs rna chag par mdzad doll
yon tan 'od ces sa gsum rab grags
570
pal
rgyal ba'i ring lugs 'dzin pa des mdzad pal
550
55l
552
553
554
555
556
557
558
559
560
56l
562
563
564
565
566
567
56'
569
570
1dog A : mdog B. Note that here Las chen agrees with ms. A: ldog, see I) 156a5, 2) 309a5, 3) 613.5.
mkhim chen comp!. : abbr. lnkhen AB.
mnos em. : nod AB.
bya burA :}a burB. See English translation.
thugscomp!. thuDB: thugA.
ngedB: nged{-} A.
gda '0 A: 'da '0 B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gda' - 'dug gam yod pa. Note: Las chen I) agrees
with ms. A: 156bl: gda'.
Tl kA em. : Ti ka AB.
mdzad do comp!. : abbr. mdzod AB.
brgyud em. : rgyud A : rgyun B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sdom brgyud - sor byang sngags gsum
gyi sdom pa 'i bla brgyud
ma chad is prob. an abbreviation of bar ma chad pa; Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. bar ma chad pa-
rgyun ma chad pa.
zhes A : om. B.
ba'iB :pa'iA.
zhal ta comp!.: abbr. zhal+taA: zhal1taB; cf. Jiischke 1881: zhal, zhal(v. zhalta); zhal ta, 2. resp.
for kha ta, kha gdams - direction, instruction, counsel, advice. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. zhal fa -
slobston.
blangs te B : blang sfe A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. len pa - (td.) blangs pa, blang ba, longs;
Goldstein 2001, s.v. dang du lenpa 2. va. to accept/recognize.
baA: om. B.
sogs comp!. : sog+s A : la soD pa B.
shAkem.: shagA: shakB.
log B : logs A.
TJ kA em. : Ti ka B : Ti ka A.
gragscomp!.: graDB: gragA.
94 Chapter 5
thub pa'i nang mdzod 'dul ba 'bum sde'i don!
rna Ius sdud
571
byed legs bshad 'di byas soil
zhes gsungs S0572 I I
bl0
573
bstod parj514
thub pas Ian gcig min par bsngags pa yil
tshul khrims 'phags pa'i nor bum gzigs nas nil
nyer (9b) sbas zla ba'i nor bu yon tan 'od!
thams cad yod smra mkhas pa'i (S 282) dgongs pa bzhin!
'dul ba 'bum sde'i dgag Sgrub
576
gnang gsum gyil
bslab pa'i gnas la mkhas shing 'da' mi byed! ces so
577
11
[2.5.8]
de nas bdag nyid chen po desl snying po'i don gtso bor ston pa 'phags pa klu sgrub kyi zhal
snga
578
nas mdzad pal dbu rna rigs pa'i tshogs la gzigs par bzhed na'ang I de dus su gangs ri'i
khrod na [B: dbu ma'i] bka,579 rna chad tsam rna gtogs
580
'chad nyan gyis
581
gtan la 'bebs pa
dang I sgom sgrub kyis582 nyams su len pa'i srol nyams par gyur nasi thugs shin tu chad par gyur
kyang I bshad pa dpalldan bla rna dam pa la zhu dgongs na'ang I dbus na bzhugs pas rna byung
bar
583
1 chos rje
584
byang seng ba
5S5
la rigs tshogs bzhi brgya pal 'jug pa sogs dbu rna'i SkOr'86
mams
587
gsan nas I dkon rnchog gsum
588
la gsol ba btabl thugs rab kyis yang yang spyad pasl
sngon gyi srnon Iam
589
dang I sbyang pa'i mthu dang I dkon mchog gi
590
byin gyis rlabs
591
Ia
571
572
573
574
575
576
577
578
579
580
581
582
583
584
585
586
587
588
589
590
591
sdudB: bsdudA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. sdudpa- (td.) bsduspa, bsdu ba, sdus2) sdompa.
zhes gsungsso campI. : abbr. zhesungso B : ces gsungso A.
blo campI. : <blo> B : am. A.
Source: dPalldaa bla ma dam pa ku ma ra ma ti'i yon tan Ijes su draa nas cung zad bstod pa, in Tsong
khapa'i bka' 'bum thorbu,gSungthorbu, vol. kha, p. 6a4. Cf. Toh. 5274 (4) A eulogy to Kumarama-
ti, the chief teacher ofTsongkhapa. Note that there the first line starts with rgyal bas instead of thub
pas.
bu A : du B. Note that B agrees with the above-mentioned source.
sgrub B : bsgrub A.
ces so campI. : ceso A : zheso B.
sngaB: mnga' A; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. zhal snga -spyan sngaste, sku dngoskyi drung.
bka'A :kaB.
gtogs em. : rtogs B : gtog pa A; cf. Jaschke 1881: gtogs pa, ma gtogs pa.
gyisB : gyi A.
kyis B : gyi A.
barB : parA.
chos Ije em. : abbr. choes AB.
byang seng ba B : abbr. byengseM pa A.
skor B : bskor A.
mams B : <maMs> A.
dkon mchog gsum campI. : abbr. dkaugsuM A : abbr. dkaug B; cf. NgCh 346.5-6: dkon mchog la gsoJ
ba btab.
smon Jam campI. : 'abbr. smon laMA: abbr. smonMB.
dkon mchog gi campI. : abbr. dkaugi AB.
byin gyis rlabs campI. : abbr. byin+Iabs A : abbr. byin+Iabs B; cf. note 71.
Text Edition
95
brten nas
592
klu Sgrub
593
yab sras dpalldan zla ba grags pa
594
dang bcas pa'i dgongs pa phyin ci
roa log par thugs su chud cing I mkhas pa chen po legs595 ldan 'byed dang I rang rgyud shar
96
gsuro gyi gzhung lugs maws kyang ma ' dres par mkhyen nasi' chad nyan (5Ja) gyis legs par gtan
la phab;S97
de'i dus su slob rna maws kyis rtsa 'jug bzhi
598
gsum sogs gal che ba maws la yig.Cha,599 'jog
par
600
mdzad par zhu zhes yang yang gsol ba btab pa'i ngor rtsa 'jug bzhi gsum! tshig gsal
601
gyi
stong thun gyi , grel pa mams mdzad nasi slob dpon
602
thams cad kyis
603
'chad nyan mdzad pas
dbu roa'i 'chad nyan gyi (S283) srollegs par gtod pa'i
604
(lOa) mthu la brten nas
605
1 de'i dus su
chos kyi rje grags pa
606
rgyal mtshan zhang dbonllotstsha ba skyabs mchog dpal khu dbonl
mkhas pa chen po g.yag phrug pa
607
sangs rgyas dpal dpon slob maws kyis kyang dbu ma la
'chad nyan mdzad pas
608
1 gangs can gyi khrod
609
'dir dbu ma'i bshad srol dar zhing rgyas par
gyur kyang I phal cher rang rgyud kyi Ita ba'i thogna
61O
gnas shing I thal 'gyur gyi Ita ba thugs
su chud pa tsaw ma byung 'dug stel 'di tsaw yang dga' mo yin! ngas
611
dang por slob gnyer
byed dusl sa skya sogs na dbu ma'i dpe cha
612
gcig , dug zer nasi nor mi cher byed pa ' dugl ding
sang dbu ma'i dpe
613
cha la rtsis su byed pa ' di yang I kho bos bstan pa la
614
bya ba byas pa yin
5.2
5.3
594
5.5
5.6
5.,
5.8
5
600
601
602
603
604
605
606
607
608
60.
610
611
612
613
614
brten nas A: abbr. rtenas B; cf. Iiischke 1881: rtenpa, (b)rten nas;cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. rten
pa (trod.) brten pa, brten pa, rten 1) Itos pa, ... rgyu dang rkyen la brten nas 'bras bu byung.
kIu sgrub B : kIu sgrub{s} A.
grags pa A : om. B.
JegscompI.: abbr.l+yesA: leDB; cf. note 194.
shar B : bshad A.
gtan laphabA: bstanlaphabB; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v.phab pa - 'bebspa'i 'daspa. Note: In
ms. A a gter tsheg (Illuminator, s.v. gter tsheg "abbr. of gter ma 'i tsheg ring, a long break for gter
mao ''), also called gter shad, represented by the colon (cf. Extended Wylie p. 7), marks the place for
the insertion of the following text <de dus su ... mams mdzas nBS>. It is placed in smaIl letters in an
extra line top to the first. Ms. B incorporates this insertion in its flowing text.
de'i dus su slob ma mams kyis rtsa 'jug bzhi compI. : abbr. de'i dus su slob ma mams+yis rtsa 'jug
bzhiB: dedussuslomamaMkyisrtsa 'jug4A.
chaA: om. B.
parA: reB.
tshig gsal compI. : abbr. tshigsal AB.
slab dpon compI. : abbr. slaub A : dpon slob B.
kyisB: kyiA.
gtad pa 'i A : abbr. bstad'iB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gtod pa - (td.) 1. btod pa, gtod pa, gtad-
gsarbza'amgsar'dzugs.
brten nas compI. : abbr. brtenas AB.
chas kyi Ije grags pa compI. : abbr. chas+yi Ije graD pa B : chos kyi grags pa A.
phrugB: sprugpaA; cf. TBRC code P1971: g.YagphrugpaSangs rgyas dpal (1350-1414).
pasB :paA.
gangs can gyi khrod A : gangs ri'i khrodB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gangs ri'i khrad2) bad yul;
cf. Iiischke 1881: gangs, gangs can; khrad, ri khrod - an assemblage (mass) of mountains; Goldstein
2001, s.v. gangs can 1. Tibet, 2. snowy.
naA: duB.
ngasem.: ngaAB.
dpechaB : dpe' chaA; cf. Iiischke 1881: dpe, Compo dpechavulgo the common word for book.
dpe B : dpe' A; cf. above note 612.
Note deviation Las chen 3) 613.20: pha (father), but 1) 156b5, 2) 31Oa.3 match with mss. A and B: lao
96
Chapter 5
gsungs/ 615 kanna ba
616
dkon gzhon gyi gsung
617
gis/ ding sang gangs ri'i kbrod na mkhas pa
dang / blun p0618 kun kha
619
dbu ma sna dbu ma zer ba 'di red mda' ba'i620 drin yin!621 de gong
du thang sag na dbu
622
ma shi ro gcig 'dug zer! gzhan yod pa'i lab ma thos
623
gsungs
624
/
(1) rgya gar bal po bod kyi yul mams sui
mdo don smra ba'i mkhas pa mang byon yang /
phal cher
625
rtog pas sbyar ba'i don tsam la/
mkhas par zad kyi de nyid don la min!
(2) thub pa'i bstan la nyid kyi
626
dgongs pa bzhin/
'khrul med smra ba 'phags pa kln sgrub yin!
de yi
627
bzhed gzhung rab dkar kun da'i tshal
628
/
ji bzhin 'byed
629
mkhas
630
dpalldan zla ba yin!
(3) slob dpon de dag
631
dgongs pa 'di yin zhes/
mkhas dom mang yang sn la ci cha yod/
mam bkra tshon
632
gyi ri mo gsal ba (S284) yi/
mam (lOb) dbye dmus
633
long mams
634
la yod dam ci/
615
616
617
618
619
620
621
622
623
624
625
626
627
623
629
630
631
632
633
634
gsungs campI. : abbr. gs+yaAB; cf. note 143. Cf. NgCh 346.6-7: nged dang po slob gnyer byed dus
dbu ma 'i dpe cha gcig 'dug ces nor mi che bar byed pa la, ding sang rtsis su byed pa 'di kho bas bstan
pa 1a bya byas pa yin zhes gsung. Shes bya'i gter mdzod317.12-13: rje 'di bas kyang ngas dang par
slob gnyer byed dus sa skya sags na dbu ma 'i dpe cha gcig 'dug zer na mi tshos brtsi mthong chen po
mi dbyed, deng sang dbu ma 'i dpe cha 1a gees spras byed pa 'di 'ang bdag gis bstan pa 1a bya ba byas
pa'i 'bras bu yin gsungs.
ba A: pa B. Note different spelling note 819: karmA pa. See English translation.
gsungA: gs+yaB.
po A : pa B; cf. Jaschke 1881: b1un pa - dull, stupid; stupidity, folishness; blun po - stupid, foolish;
fool; idiot. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. b1un pa - nnongs pa ste mi shes pa; b1un po - shes dg nnongs
p a ~ j m1:
kha B : dga' A. Shes bya 'i gter mdzod317.1 0 reads kUll gyis kha. kha dbu ma sna dbu ma = literally,
"Madhyamaka is the mouth, Madhyamaka is the nose." Probably a proverbial expression for valuing
or paying attention to something.
mda' ba'iem. : mda'pa'i A: 'da'pa'iB.
Cf. NgCh 346.7: k81l1la pa dkon mchog gzhon nu 'i gsung gis, din SOllg mkhas nnongs kun kha dbu ma
sna dbu ma zer ba 'di J'ed mda' ba 'i drin yin gsungs, gsang 'dus dang dbu ma 1a 'di bka' drin che.
dbuB: {-}<dbu>A.
thos B : tshor A.
gsullgscompl.: gs+yaB: gsungA. Cf. SeyfortRuegg (2000: 62n139) quotes the same statement from
Thu'u bkvan a little different.
pha1 chercompl. : abbr. pher AB.
kyiA: kyisB.
de yi em. : de'i AB; cf. Red mda' ba (1993: 359.1).
kun da 'i tsha1B : <kull da'i tsha1> A; cf. Jaschke 1881: lam da - jessamine.
ji bzhin 'byed campI. : ji 4n 'byedB : de bzhin 'byed A. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. 'byed pa (td.)
pllye ba, dbye ba, phyes I) kha 'phra1 ba.
Cf. Red mda' ba (1993: 359.1: pal; same Ye shes rgyal mtshan 898.24.
de dag A: abbr. deg B.
mam bkra tshon campI. : abbr. maM bkJ'a tshon B : abbr. maM bkra mtshon A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen
rna, s.v. mam bkra'-mamparbkra ba'i bdus tshig.
dmusB: musA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. dmus 10ng-khog zharteskye dus nasmig long ba.
mamscompl.: maMsA: dagB.
Text Edition
(4) long bas
635
rin chen gter (SIb) kha phyed pa ltarl
roam dag 'phags pa'i mig dang mi ldan yang I
rgyal dang rgyal ba'i sras kyi byin brlabs
636
lasl
rten 'byung zab mo'i lam
637
'di kho bos bmyed
638
1
[B: blo] stodparl
stobs bcu mnga' ba thub pa'i ring lugs pal
mtha' bral shing rta'i srol 'byed 'dzam gling rgyan/
gang gis bde bar gshegs pa'i gdung 'tshob
640
pal
kIu sgrub zla grags gnyis kyi bzhed pa'i lugsl
ji bzhin thugs su chud pa'ang khyed du basI
[B: chos rje
642
]
(1) mthar lta'i g.yang sa ring du spangs gyur lal
dus gsum gshegs pa mams kyi bgrod pa'i shull
bzung dang' dzin pa'i 'jigs pa las sgroI bal
dbu ma'i lam nas khyod ni gshegs pa lagsl zhes
643
dang I
ces gsungs
639
I
zhes gsungs
641
11
(2) snyigs644 ma'i dus 'dir ngan rtog chang gis myos gyur pasl
de nyid don la skye bo mams ni 'khrug pa'i
645
tshel
gang gis spros kun bsal
646
nas stong nyid zab mo'i
647
don!
yang dag legs rtogs
648
mam dpyod 'di ni e ma mtsha;rP
49
1 zhes S0
650
l1
basB :pasA.
byin brlabsA: abbr. byin+labsB; cf. note 91.
lam compl. : laMB: don A.
97
635
636
637
638
bmyed B : myed A; cf. !aschke 1881: myed pa, pf. bmyed, bmyes, fut. bmyed (Skt. labh) to get,
obtain, acquire; to meet with, find.
639
640
641
642
643
644
645
646
647
648
649
650
ces gsungs compl. : abbr. ces+ya A : abbr. cesungs B. final -gs comparable to Krasser, p. 1, no. 4
gzugs. These are the first four verses of in total nine verses from the epilogue to Red mda' ba's
Madhyamakiivafiira commentary. Verse 6 is cited below (see p. 130) . See Cf. Red mda' ba (1993:
358.17-360.1). Ye shes rgyal mtshan 898.20-899.9 contains all nine verses.
'tshobem.: tshobAB; cf. note 54!.
zhes gsungs em. : abbr.: zhessung B : ceso A. Cf. note 544.
chos de compl. : <chos de> B : om. A.
zhes B : ces A.
snyigsem.: <nyi>snyiDB: myingsA.
'khrog pa 'i A: 'khmD'iB.
bsalB : gsal A.
mo'iB : mo<'i> A.
Cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. legs pa - bzang ba 'am spus dag pa, .. .legs par rtogs pa.
mtshar B: 'tshar A.
zhesso compl. : abbr.: zhesoB: abbr.: cesoA.
98 Chapter 5
[2.5.9]
de nas
651
bdag nyid chen po des theg pa thams cad kyi yang rtse rdo rje theg pa la 'jug par
dgongs nasi mal 'byor gyi
652
dbang phyug chen po byang chub rtse mo'i drung dul dpal gsang
ba 'dus'pa mi skyod
653
rdo rje la sogs pa'i dbang 'ga' zhusl gsang mtshan yang mi skyod
654
rdo
rjer gsoll rgyud 10 tstsha ba
655
nam bzang pa
656
la zhus/
657
man ngag chos kyi rje grags pa rgyal
mtshan pa'i drung du zhusl dpalldan bla rna dam pa'i drung du dgyes pa rdo rje la sogs pa'i
dbang 'ga' zhusl 10 tstsha ba
658
skyabs mchog dpal bzang po (S285) la rgyud kyi bshad pa zhusl
bla rna dpalldan pa'i drung dU
659
lam 'bras man ngag chos skyong660 che chung gi 'khor
661
dang
bcas pa zhusl sa bzangpaI). chen pa'i drung du! (Ila) bde mchog sogs662 dbang 'ga' zhusl chos Ije
skyabs mchog pa'i drung du rdo rje phreng bal gsang 'dus 'jam rdor
663
I 'jig rten
664
dbang phyugl
sa skya pa'i pha chos rdo rje gzhon nu sogs mang du zhusl
'phags pa klu
665
sgrub kyis mdzad pa'i rim
666
lngal mdor byasl 'phags pa lhas mdzad
667
pa'i
spyod (52a) bsdus sgron ma
668
1 dpalldan zla bas mdzad pa'i gsang 'dus sgron gsalla sogs pa
'phags lugs
669
kyi rgya 'grel thams cad dang I rgyal po indra bd
70
dhi la sogs pa
671
gSaI).g 'dus
snga srol ba672 mams kyi dgongs pa phyogs gcig tu bsdus pal Siinti
673
pas
674
mdzad pa'i bshad
651
652
653
654
655
656
657
658
659
660
661
662
663
664
665
666
667
668
669
670
671
672
673
674
denasB: denaA.
gyiB : gyis A.
skyod A: bskyodB. Las chen agrees with ms. B: bskyod, see I) 156b6, 2) 31Oa3, 3) 613.23.
skyod A: bskyodB. Las chen agrees with ms. B: bskyod, see I) 156b6, 2) 310a4, 3) 614.1.
ba B : <ba> A; see note 528.
pa campI. : <pa> A : am. B; prob. abbr. for nam (rokha J bzang (/Jo);Refers to Lo chen Nam mkha'
bzang po (b. 14th cent.; TBRC code P2921). See English translation.
Cf. Ye shes rgyal mtshan 893: 10 chen skyabsmchogdpal bzangpo'i drungdu rgyud kyi bshadpa.
Scenote 528. Las chen: 10 chen, see I) 157al, 2) 310a4, 3) 614.1.
B carries here the mark x+ya; below the last line the insertion (in dbu can) is to be found in small
letters, marked with x+ya at the beginning and the end: <lam 'bras man ngag ... dJ7Jng du>. Probably
haplography, since drung du appears several times on this page (abberation occuli).
chos skyong B : abbr. choskyong A.
'khorem. : bskor A : skor B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'khor bcas - 'khor dang bcas pa ste, ngo
ma rjes 'brang dang bcas pa.
bdemchog sogscompI. : abbr. bdegoswoA: abbr. bdeom 10D'iB.
'jam rdorcompI. : abbr. jaM rdor B : jaMs rdor A. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. jam rdor - 'jam dpai
rdo rje 'j mtsham gyi bsdus mingo
jIg rten compI. : abbr. JIen AB; cf. Jaschke 1881: jIg rtcn.
klu B : <klu> A.
rim B : rims A.
mdzadB : byas A.
sgron ma B : sgroI me A.
lugscompI.: IuDB: <JuD>A.
indra bo em. : indra bho B : Jindra bho A.
la sogs pa compI. : abbr. 10D pa B : abbr. laswo A.
snga sroi ba B : snga{-} sral <ba> A.
shAnti em. : shantiB : shan ti A.
pasB: basA.
Text Edition
99
sbyar
675
snyim pa'i me tot
76
dang I ye shes zhabs kyis677 mdzad pa'i sgrub thabs
678
kun tu bzang
pol mar me mdzad [B: bzang pos mdzad] pa'i dkyil chog bzhi brgya pa ' grel pa dang bcas paf
79
stha ga na'i
680
, grel pal rgyal bas byin gyi68b grel pa la sogs pal dpal gsang ba ' dus pa lugs gsum
gyi rgya 'grel mams dang I bod kyi Ije 'gos bdot
82
klan gsum dang I sa skya pa
683
khu dbon I
rin po che
684
bu ston pa la sogs pa'i legs bshad
685
mams la yang dag pat
86
gzigs rtog
687
mdzad
pasl gsang ba ' dus pa'i rgyud 'grel cha lag dang beas pa'i tshig don ma Ius pa thugs su chud nasi
rdo J.je , dzin pa chen por gyur tel gsang , dus rtsa ba'i rgyud kyi p-Kii
688
[B: dang]1 mngon rtogs I
bdag 'jug mchod phreng I rim
689
lnga'i bsdus don la sogs pa mdzad (8286) nasi
(1) 'phags pa rdo J.je'i man ngag [B: dang I]
bshad rgyud gzhan gyi Ijes 'brangs
690
nasi
'dus pa'i rgyud chen rim pa lngat
91
1
dpalldan zla ba grags pas bshadl
(2) sngon rabs rgyud pa'i man ngag dang I
phyi ma'i (lib) rgyud kyi Ijes 'brang
692
nasi
rgyud don bsnyen Sgrub
693
yan lag bzhirl
rin chen 'byung gnas
694
zhi bas phyel
(3) 'jam pa'i dbyangs kyi man ngag gisl
rgyud don bskyed
695
pa'i rim pa dang /
(i/5
'7'
77
678
679
8.
681
82
683
684
685
68.
687
88
68.
69.
691
692
693
694
695
sbyarB: byangA; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. bshad sbyar-rtsa ba dang 'grcJpasbyarba.
snyimpa'imetagcompI.: abbr. snyimpa'im+teagB: snyimspa'imetagA .
kyis B : kyi A.
sgrub thabs B : bsgrubs thab A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sgrub thabs - 2) Iha sgrub pa 'i cha ga.
bzang pas mdzad pa'i dkyii chag bzhi brgya pa 'grei pa dang bcas pa compI. : abbr. bzangpas
mdzad'i dkyil chog bzhi brgya pa 'grei pa dang bcas pa B : kyi bsgrub thab+s dkyii mchag, bzhi brgya
pa 'grei pa dang bcas pa A .
sthagana'iem.: thagana'iA: thakana'iB.
bas byin gyi compI. : abbr. bas byin+yiB : ba{-}<s> byin gyi A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. byin
- gzhan gyi bsam pa dang snang ba sags bsgyur thub pa 'i nus pa 'am mthu .
bdag B : gdag A.
paB: <pa>A.
rinpachecompl.": abbr. dnaeB: abbr. dna cheA.
Note that Las chen states not iegs bshad, but yig c[h]a, sec 1) 157a3, 2) 31OaS, 3) 614.8.
yang dag par B : <yang dag par> A. "
nag B : tog A; cf. Goldstein 2001: gzigs nag - h. of ita nag, ita nag - inspecting, investigating,
overseeing; va. -byed - to inspect, to oversee .
TlkAem.: TikaAB.
dmB :dm+sA.
Ijes 'bnmgscompI.: Ijes 'bnmg+sA: abbr. Ijesu 'bnmgsB.
ingar B : lnga<r> A.
'bnmg A: 'bnmgs B.
sgrub B : bsgrub A.
gnas B : idan A.
bskyed A : skycdB.
100
rdzogs rim thig Ie rnam
696
gsum duJ
sangs rgyas ye shes zhabs kyis
697
bstanJ
(4) 'phags dang mkhas pas gsa! byas pa'i /
'dus pa'i rgyud chen shing rta'i sro1/
rim pa gsum du phye ba'i
698
doni
rnyed pa gang de ya mtshan noll
[B: blo] bstod parf
oo
Chapter 5
(1) thub pa chen pOS701 chos kyi rnam grangs nil
ji snyed gsungs
702
pa kun gyi rtser
703
gyur pal
rgyud sde'i mthar thug
704
dpa!ldan 'dus pa yi/
mtha' drug tshul bzhi
705
rgyas btab
706
rdo rje'i tshig/
(2) ji bzhin legs par phye nas rim gnyis kyi/
ting , dzin mchog gi bde Ia rol bas nal
rdo rje 'dzin
707
pa zhes bya'i
708
sgra de yang /
mgon po khyod Ia (52b) don dang bcas par 'jug
[2.5.10]
zhes gsungs
699
/
ces so /f
o9
gong du bstan pa'i b1a ma de rnams gus pas bsten
7
!O pa yin te
711
/
skye dgu'f12 gtsug rgyan chos rje bsod rgya1 dang I
rgyal ba'i sras po thogs713 med bzang p0714 dpal/
60.
97
60'
99
700
701
702
703
704
705
70.
707
70'
709
710
711
712
713
714
thig Ie mam comp!. : abbr. thieg maMB : thig Ie {-} maMA; c Jaschke 1881: thig Ie .
kyisB : kyi<s> A.'
ba'iB :pa'iA; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v.phye ba-1. 'byedpa'i'daspa .
zhcsgsungscomp!.: abbr. zhcsungsB: cesgsungsA.
Source: dPalidan bia ma dam pa ku ma 1'8 ma ti'i yon tan Jjes su draa nas cung zad bstod pa, in Tsong
khapa'i bka' 'bum thorbu,gSung 'bum, vo!. kha, p. 6b3-4. Cf. Toh. 5274 (4) A eulogy to Kumiirama-
ti, the chiefteacher ofTsongkhapa.
chCllposem.: <chenpo'i>A: abbr.: chenpoB; cf. Ye shes rgyalmtshan 901.10.
gsungs B : gsung+s A.
kun gyi rtserem. : kun gyi rtse B : chos kyi rtser A.
mthar thug B : abbr. mthrug A.
bzhi comp!. : abbr. 4B : abbr. 4'i A.
btab A : bstan B.
'dzin A: 'in[tsa rtagsJB.
zhes bya 'i comp!. : shcs+ya'iB : zhcs pa 'i A.
Note that these two verses also match with Ye shes rgyal mtshan 901.10-14.
bstenB: brtenA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. stenpa(td.) bstenpa, bstenpa, sten-nye barbsnyen
pa 'am nyc bar gfug pa, ... sman pa bsten pa, dge rgan sten pa.
yin teB: abbr. yineA.
skye dgu'iB : skycs dgu<'i> A; c Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. skye dgu - 'gro ba selDS can thams cad
dc, 'dod pa'i khams las tshe 'phos te khams gsum du skye ba gsum, gzugs khams las tshe 'phos te
khams gsum du skye ba gsum, gzugs med khams las tshe 'phos te khams gsum du skye ba gsum Ia
bya'o. .
thogscomp!. : thoDB : thogA.
poBY:po'iA.
Text Edition
101
JIla ti pal}. chen pal}.7l5 chen byang rtse dang I
, mkhas pa'i dbang po nya dbon kun dga' sogsl
bka' drin JIlllOS
716
pa'i bla rna bcu phrag gnyisl
"yun ring717 'bad de7lS gus pa'i gtsug gis719 bsten
720
1 zhes so72111
, gong du bstan pa'i so thar byang sems
722
rig 'dzin gyi sdom pa gsum yan lag dang bcas pa(S287)
sku srog 1as
723
kyang gees par bsrungs pa yin tel
(1) kho bos sangs rgyas bstan la rab byung nasi
, rigs dang mi rigs 'byed shes tshun chad
724
du!
'Ius ngag yid
725
kyi spyod pa ci byed kyang I
rab tu bsgrims te726 thub pa'i (120) gsung bzhin SgrubS
727
1
(2) thog728 med sgoms729 pa'i nyon mongs
730
shugs
731
drag pasl
gal te
732
mi rigs733 cung zad byas na yang I
de yf34 mod la dug zos dran pa bzhin/
'gyod sems Idan
735
pas slar yang chos bzhin byasl zhes gsungs solf
36
7lS
716
m
718
719
720
721
_ 722
123
72.
72S
126
127
128
129
130
731
132
133
134
135
736
paNBY : mkhan A.
mnos Y : nod AB.
ring B : rings A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. yun ring - dus yun ring po.'
'bad de B : abbr. 'bade A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'bad pa 1.(td.) 'bad p8, 'bad pa, 'bod - rtsol '
ba dang brtson pa.
gtsug gis Y : gtsugis B : tshuJ gyi A; cf. Jaschke 1881: gtsug 1. crown of the head, vertex, Lt., spyi
gtsug.
bsten B: brten A. Acc. to Jackson (lesson Sept. 2002) brten always demands 18, whereas bsten can
directly take an object and also means: to stay with somebody, to stay close to somebody as their
servant, student etc.
zhes so compl. : abbr. zheso B : abbr. ceso A.
byang sems compl. : abbr. byang sesMB : abbr. byesM A.
lasem. :pasAB.
chadB : chod A; cf. Goldstein 2001, S.v. tshun chad; tshun chad Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. tshun
chad - dbye mtshams nas rang ngos suphyogs pa. Jaschke 1881: tshun, gen. with chador cad or 18,
signifying within, by, not later than, as postp. c. accus., rabs bdun tshun chadwithin seven generations,
(they will be happy) even to the seventh generation.
yidB :yiA.
bsgrims te em. : abbr. bsgrisM ste A : sgrims te B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sgrim pa - (td.)
bsgrims pa, bsgrim pa, sgrims 1) rtse gcig tu gzhol ba.
bsgrubs em. : bsgrub+s A : sgrubs B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sgrub pa 1. (td.) bsgrubs pa,
bsgrub pa, sgrubs 1) byed pa.
thogA: thoDB. LNreads: thogmed= thogmamedpa.
sgomsem. : goMs B : gam A.
nyon mongs compl. : abbr. nyaungs B : abbr. nyau<n>ngs A.
shugscompl. : shuDB : shug A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. shugs 1) nus pa dang stabs.
gal te B : abbr. gal+te A.
Cf. Tshigmdzod chen mo, s.v. mirigspa -mi 'thadpa'ammi 'ospa.
yiB: 'iA; (metre). Note that Ye shes rgyalmtshan 899.16 agrees withms. B.
ldanB : dranA. Note that Ye shes rgyalmtshan 899.16-17 agrees withms. B.
zhes gsungs so compl. : abbr. zhes gsungso B : abbr. ces+yo A. The source of this quote has not been
identified yet. Note that Ye shes rgyal mtshan 899.13-23 in addition continues with three more verses.
The last and one more verse are to be found below. Seep. 118.
102
Chapter 5
[B: chos Y37 stod pari
gzhan dag khas len chu yi738 ri mo bzhin/
mang po nyid kyang 'pbral du yal bar
739
bgyid
740
I
[B: khyod ni rdo la ri mo bris pa bzhin/]741
shi yang dam bca' gzhan du bgyid la742 lagsl
zhes solf
43
[2.5.11]
bdag nyi chen po de nyid nif44 thub pa'i ring lugs pa bla na med pa yin te
745
1 nyams len byin
dabs kyi brgyud
746
parrdo Ije 'chang nas bzung ste
747
/bcu dgu pa la byon zhing
748
1 zab mo Ita
ba'i brgyud
749
par thub pa chen po nas bzung stel nyi shu1
50
rtsa gnyis pa la byon lal rgya chen
spyod pa'i brgyud
751
par thub pa chen po nas bzung
752
stel nyi shu rtsa bdun pa
753
la byon [B:
nas]1 brgyud
754
pa gsumka'i bka' brgyud
755
sgrub brgyud
756
dar rgyas su mdzad pa yinnolf
57
[2.6 Verse 6]
[6] mdo rgyud bstan bcos kun la legs sbyangs nasi
rtag chad mthar Ita'i grub758 mtha' ma Ius pal
737
738
739
740
741
742
743
744
745
740
747
748
749
750
m
752
7S3
754
7SS
756
7S7
7S8
chos compJ. : <chos> B : om. A; cf. note 642.
yiB: 'i A; (metre).
barB: baA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. yaJ ba (tmd.) mthong rgyu med par gyur pa.
Cf. note 239.
A' states in yig chung that here a line seems to be missing in the original manuscript: 'dir ma dper
tshig rkang zhig chad pa 'drs. This again proofs that A' follows only ms. A, since B is holding the
missing line. rnA had no access to ms. B at the time of preparing the print of A'. Only ms. B holds a
complete verse.
laB:maA.
zhes so compJ. : abbr. zheso B : abbr. ceso A.
nyid w'A : niB.
yin tecompJ. : abbr. yineAB.
byin rlabs kyi brgyud em. : abbr. byin+labs kyi rgyudB : abbr. byin+labs <kyi> rgyud A.
bzung ste B : gzung te A.
zhing B : cing A.
brgyudem.: rgyudAB.
nyi shu compJ. : abbr. nyiu AB.
brgyud em. : rgyud AB.
bzung B : gzung A.
paA:om.B.
brgyud em. : rgyud AB.
brgyud em. : rgyud AB.
sgrub brgyud em. : sgrub rgyud B : bsgrub rgyud A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sgrub brgyud-
sgrub pa nyams len gyi brgyud pa.
In Ye shes rgyal'mtshan, pp. 903-05 this part is only indirectly dealt with at the very end of the
biography.
grub em. : sgrub AB.
Text Edition
103
'roam dag lung dang dngos stobs rigs
759
pas bshig/
'log smra tshar geod
760
khyod la phyag 'tshalloll
~ ~ e s 7 6 1 pa nil gong du bshad pa'i mdo rgyud bstan bcos de dag la legs par sbyangs pa yin tel rgya gar nas
"(530) 'gyur bstan bcos thams cad dang"62 I
rodo dang rgyud sde phal eher legs par bltas
763
1
'(13288) rang gzhan grub mtha'i de nyid 'byed pa lal
:rnkhas mang mdun
764
sar 'jigs med SpObS
765
pa thobl ees gsungsl
[2.6.1]
'bdag nyid chen po 'dil dang po nas
766
thams cad mkhyen pa bu ston rin po che la mos pa gcig
,yodna'ang I slob dpon dang grogs mched sogs767 kyi stobs kyis (I2b) kun mkhyen
768
chen po'i
grub mtha' la 'dris ches pa cig
769
byung nasi jo nang gi grub mtha'i rgyab rten
770
rgyud dus kyi
'khor 101 mdo my a ngan las 'das pa chen pol dgongs
771
pa nges 'grell lang kar gshegs
772
pal
bstan bcos rgyud bla maf
73
chos dbyings bstod pa sogs la rten par
774
dgongs nasi mdo rgyud
bstan beos de dag gi dgongs pa phyin ci ma log par blangs nasi jo nang pa'i grub mtha' 'di
gting775 tshugs pa gcig byed dgongs te
776
1 man mun brag khar
777
byon nasi mdo rgyud bstan
,bCOS
778
de dag la gzigs rtog
779
tshar gsum mdzad pasl dang po la jo nang pa'i grub mtha' mdo
rgyud bstan be os de dag gi dgongs pa yin nges par
780
'dug dgongs pa byung I gnyis pa la yin
min the tshom za ba gcig byung I gsum pa la dgongs pa las phyin ci log tu78! go ba gcig byung
gsungl
759
760
761
762
763
764
765
766
767
-768
769
770
771
772
773
77.
775
776
m
778
77.
780
781
rigsem.: rigAB.
gcod A : spyodB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. tshar gcod - pham par byed pa'am Joms par byed
pa, ... smra ba ngan pa tshar gcod byas pa, ... dgra bo tshar gcod byed pa. Goldstein 200 I, s.y. !shar gcod
- annihilation, eradication, extermination.
zhes B : ces A.
thams cad dangcompl. : abbr. thaMdng AB.
bl!ascompl. :<b>ltasB: ltasA.
mdun A: 'dun B. Note that Ye shes rgyal mtshan 902.1 agrees with ms. A.
spobsB: spobA. Note that Ye shes rgyal mtsha'n 902.1 agrees with ms. B.
nas em : n+sa A : <nBs> B.
dang grogs mched sogs em. : dang groD mchedB : rang grog mched swo A.
kun mkhyen compl. : abbr. kuen AB.
la 'dris ches pa cigcompl. : abbr. la 'drjs ches pa 1 B : abbr. <1a> 'dris che ba 1 A.
rgyab rten B : abbr. rgyabrten A; cf. liischke 1881: rgyab, compo rgyab rten.
dgongs B : dgong A.
kar gshegs compl. : kar gsheDB : dkar gshegs A.
maB: om. A.
rtenr B : brten parA.
gtjng em. : ting AB.
dgongs te B : dgong nas A.
brag khar B : graD khar A.
mdorgyud bstan bcoscompl.: abbr. mdorgyud bstosB: abbr. mdosgyud bstos {--}A.
rtog B : tog A; cf. note 687.
ngesparcompl. : abbr. ngesrB : <nges> parA (cross between yjn and par marks place of insertion).
tuA: duB.
104 Chapter 5
de nas gdan sar mkhan chen sangs rgyas 'phel ba'i drung du byon nasi jo nang pa'i grub mtha'
, di mdo rgyud bstan bCOS
782
, di dag gi dgongs pa yin bsams nas/lta rtog zhib tu bgyis na 'angf83
dgongs pa las phyr
84
rol du gyur gda,785 lags zhus pasl khyod mkhas grags
786
pas shin tu btlen
gsungs nasi ca ra
787
mdzad pa byung I de dus ston pa la springs
788
yig mdzad pasl mkhan chen
pa shin tu rna mnyes (S289) te
789
1 'khon
790
'dzin mdzad pa byung I de nas bdag nyid chen po'i
thugs la79I mkhan chen nya dbon pa 'di thugs rab
792
che zhing I tshad ma'i rig pa
793
la shin tu
mkhas pa'i stobs kyis
794
'di la
795
lung rigs796 kyi797 dgag Sgrub
798
zhus na 'gyur bar
799
ngesl
khong pa 'gyurna chu 'olkhanas 'gyurnas din/OO (53b) sang gijonangpa thams cad 'gyurba
gcig 'ong b ~ O l 'dug dgongs
802
[B: nas]1 (13a) rtse chen du nya dbon p ~ ' i drung du byon pasl
skyo rna snga btsan dU
803
song nasi dngos su mi skyon yangf04 thugs mi mnyes pa'i mam 'gyur
du rna ston kyin
805
, dug pasl da zhus kyang don du mi ' gyur bar 'dug dgongs nasjR06 gdan sar log
byon nasi bstan 'dzin
807
mams la springs yig808 nor bu 'i
809
phreng ba mdzad pasl gangs ri'i khrod
782
783
784
785
78.
787
788
789
790
791
792
793
794
795
79.
797
798
799
SOO
801
S02
803
804
S05
80.
S07
S08
S09
bstan bcoscompl. : abbr. bstosB: abbr. bcos{-} A.
tu bgyis na 'angem. : tu gyis na 'ang B : du bgyis na A; cf. note 239.
phyiB : phyis A.
gda' A: bda'B; gda' lagsresp. for: yodpayin.
grags compl. : graD B : grag A.
gsungs nBS caraero. : gsungnas tsaraA: gsung nBS bca' bca'B; cf. A': ca ra; Tshig mdzod chen mo,
s.v. ca ra ra - sgra 'i byc brag pa zhig ... skya ka 'i skad ca ra ra grag (a special tone ... the magpie's call
sounds [like 1 ca ra ra). A magpie is a black and white bird with a long tail and a noisy cry. There is a
popular belief that magpies like to steal small bright objects. Sec also Goldstein 2001, s.v. ca co: 3.
sound oflaughter.
springs B : spdng+s A.
tcB: stcA.
'khon B : kho<n> A.
laB: <la>A.
thugs rab compl. : abbr. th+ya rab B : thug rab A; cf. Jaschke 1881: thugs, compo thugs rab = shes rab.
paB: <pa>A.
kyis B : kyi A.
'di la compl. : <'di la> (below line 7) A : om. B.
rigsem.: rigAB.
kyiA:giB. .
sgrub B : bsgrub A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. dgag sgrub - min pa dgag cing yin pa sgrub pa.
bar B : ba<r> A; cf. Jaschke 1881: 'gyur ba I. vb. pf. gyur (-to, -pa) imp. gyur (-cig), cf. sgyur ba, I.
to change.
ding B : ling A.
'ong barB: 'ong {----------} bar A.
dgongs A: dgong B.
duA: laB.
dngos su mi skyon yang A : <dngos su mi skyon yang> B.
kyin B : gyi A.
'dug dgongs nBS B: 'dug {-----} dgongs te A.
bstan 'dzin A : abbr. bstin[tsa rtagsJB.
In the book title itself it says: bstan 'dzin mams laphrin du gsol ba. Cf. chapter 7, Minor Works-of
Red mda' ba, text no. 32.
bu'iB: buA.
Text Edition
105
na dus 'khor bar!lO khas ' che
8
l! ba mams dang I khyad pat
12
du jo nang pa rjes 'brang dang bcas
pas
813
dngossu rtsod par ma
814
nus kyang I lkog tu rgyud cher 'khrug par gyur toll
[2.6.2]
de'i dus su drung bzhi thog pas gtS0815 mdzad gdan sa chen po'i sde snod 'dzin pa mams
'jomS
816
pa'i drung dul bdag nyid chen pos dus 'khorla 'gal' du817 yod gsungsl karma ba818 dkon
gzhon pas
819
'gal 'du med gsungs
820
nas rtsod pa'i skabs sui karma ba
821
na rei shes bya chos
Can/
822
padma dkar p0823 blun por thal/ blun po bdag gcod
824
'dod! ces pa de sa bcu'i dbang
phyug gi
825
gsung 'khrul med yin pa'i phyirl gsa! khyab khas blangsl rtags
826
grub ste
827
1 rgyud
'gre"! dri med 'od kyi rang lugs kyi tshig yin pa'i phyir828 zer ba lat bdag nyid chen posl shes bya
chos can
829
I sgra rtag mi rtag rtsod pa'i skabs sui [B: sgra de] sgra (S290) mi rtag pa'i sgrub byed
du thal/ rgyud 'grel dri med 'od nyid sa bcu'i dbang phyug gi gsung
830
yin min rtsod pa'i
831
skabs sui rgyud ' grel dri med ' od kyi rang lugs kyi tshig yin pa del rgyud ' grel de nyid sa bcu'i
dbang phyug gi gsung yin pa'i sgrub byed yin pa'i
832
phyirl zhes gsungs
833
nasi sun phyung
.. zhing I gzhan yang bla rna shar chung ba
834
la sogs pas
835
yi ger836 (l3b) bkod nas rtsod pa byung
ba mams kyang I sgrub byed bsgrub bya dang mtshungs pa las rna byung gsungs
837
I
810
811
~ , 812
813
814
"SIS
816
817
818
81'
820
821
822
823
824
825
826
827
828
829
830
831
832
833
834
83>
836
837
bar El : <bar> A.
'checompl. : <'>cheA : phye El; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo,.s.y. khas 'che ba - rang gis khas len pa'am
rang nyid ngo sprod pa.
khyad parcompl. : abbr. khyadar B : khyad <p111;> A.
pas compl. : pa<s> A : pa roaMs B.
ma B : mi A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. nu ba - (td.) nus pa, nu ba, nus.
gtso A : rtsod pa B.
'jams em. : 'jom B : 'joM A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'jams pa - (td.) beom pa, gzhompa,
chom.
Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.y. 'gal 'du - 'gal ba.
kanna baem.: kannApaA: skarmaB; cf. note 616.
pasB: baA.
gsungs compl. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
kanna baA: skannapaB.
chos can B : abbr. chon A.
pad+ma dkar po B : abbr. pad+makar po A.
geod em. : codB : spyod A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. geod pa 1. (td.) bead pa, gead pa, chod7)
lag len byed pa.
phyug gi compl. : abbr. phyugi AB; sa bcu 'i dbang phyug = byams pa mgon po; cf. note 477.
rtagscompl. : rtaDB : rtag A.
steA:teB.
yinpa'jphyircompl.: abbr.yinpiriA: abbr. yin'iB.
shes bya chos can compl. : abbr. shes+ya chos can B.: abbr. sh+yeon A.
dbang phyug gi gsung compi. : abbr. dbang phyugisung A : abbr. dbyugi gsung B.
rtsod pa'j compi. : abbr. rtsod'i B : brtsod pa 'i A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. rtsod pa - 1. (td.)
brtsad pa, brtsad pa, rtsod
sgrub byed yin pa 'i A : <sgrub byed yin pa 'i> B.
zhes gsungs compl. : abbr. zhesungs B : ces gsung A.
baB :paA.
pas B : p+sa A.
yi gercompi. : abbr. yige<r>A: abbr. yierB; cf. Jaschke 1881: yi ge,yi ger 'bd ba, 'godpa-to com-
pose, to pen down.
gsungs compi. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
106 Chapter 5
jo nang pa'i phyogs kyi sngags
838
pa gcig gis839 (540) khyed mkhas pa chen po yin pa lal dus
'khor
840
la dgag pa mdzad rni 'os zhus pas/ de'i Ian dU
842
/ bde bar
843
gshegs pa'i gsung
rab
844
lal dgag sgrub mkhas pa mams kyis byed/ rni mams 'phying ba 'dra ba
845
lal khyi
846
l
a
rtsol ci shig yodl ces gsungs/
[2.6.3]
de'i dus su mkhan chen bstan rgyal bas gtso mdzadl jo nang pa mams gros byas nasi khongB48
, di zer na rang re ' di zer gyi lung rigs
849
mang du brtsams
850
nasi 'jam dbyangs chen po la slob
dpon gzhol! blo pa '&51 spyan drongs/ bde gshegs snying po drang nges
852
la rtsod
853
pa yin
zhus pas/ bdag nyid chen po dpon slob mams sa skyanas spyan drangs/ rtsod
854
pa'i dus SU
855
/
bdag nyid chen pos '0
856
skol rtsod
851
pa byed nal yang na rgyudl yang na mdo/ yang na bstan
bcos kho na'i steng nas byedl blun po mgu858 ba'i rtsod pa sra ste sres te
859
rni byed gsung zhing/
'jam dbyangs pas kyang de bzhin 'thad zhus pas/ khong gis lkog gros byas pa'i lung
860
rigs
mams zhig na'angB61/ dri bcas dang dri med kyi de bzhin nyid la khyad [B: par
862
] med (S291)
838
839
840
841
842
843
844
845
846
847
848
849
850
851
852
853
85.
855
856
857
858
859
860
861
862
sngags compl. : sngaDs A : sngaD B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sngags pa - sngags kyi gzungs
'dzin mkhan nam gsang sngags nyams su len mkhan.
gis B : g+si A.
dus 'khorA: abbr. duorB.
parA :paB.
duA: suB.
barA :parB.
mb A : mbs B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s. v. gsung mb - sangs rgyas kyi gsung.
'phyiIJg ba 'dra ba em. : phying pa 'dra ba B: 'phying pa 'gra' <ba> A; Another possible reading is:
mi mams 'phyiIJg ba 'dra ba la, khyi la rtsol gnyer ci shig yod For [ordinary] people these are like
wool that is not woven. What is the use if a dog tries [to make something of it].
khyiB : phyi A.
rtsol gnyerem. : tsol gnyer A : btsol gnyer B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. rtsol ba - 1. (td.) brtsaI
ba, brtsaI ba, rtso!, brtson pa dang 'bad pa. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gnyer ba (td.) I) 'tshol ba, 2)
do dam byed pa. Jaschke 1881: rtsol ba 1. vb. to endeavour, to take pains. Jaschke 1881: gnyer ba - to
take pains with, to take care of, to provide for.
khong B : kho A.
Cf. Iilwninator, s.v. lung rig= misspelling of lung rigs.
brtsams compl. : brtsaMs A : rtsaMs B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. rtsom pa - 1. (td.) brtsams pa,
brtsam pa, rtsoms 1) dpe eha sogs kyi tshig sbyor sgrig pa ... 2. tshig rgyan gyi rtsom po.
pa 'dirB: ba 'diA.
drang nges B : abbr. drengs A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. drang nges gnyis - drang don dang nges
don gnyis kyi bsdus ming.
rtsodB : brtsod A; cf. note 831.
rtsodB : brtsod A.
dussucompl.: abbr. dusuB: abbr. skabsuA.
'0 A: 'u B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. '0 skol- (mying) rang re'am mng eag.
rtsodB : brtsod A.
mguB: 'guA; cf. Jaschke 1881: 'gu ba, incorr. for mgu ba;Tshig mdzod chenmo, S.Y. mgu ba(tmd.)
yicl tshims pa 'am yi rang pa.
sm ste sre ste em. : sras ta sre te A : sras fa sras te B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sm sre - 1) phan
tshun mnyam sre byed pa. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. sre ba - (td.) bsres pa, bsre ba, sres, spe] ba'am
'dre bar byed pa. Jaschke 1881: sre ba II. vb., pf. bsres, fut. bsre, imp. (b)sres, trans. to 'dre ba; sm. to
Goldstein 2001, s.v. kroskres-mixing, va. - gtong-to mix.
fungA: fuB. '
na'angB: nasA.
parcompl. : <par> B : om. A.
Text Edition
107
cingl stobs sogs863 'dus rna byas kyi yon tangyis brgyan pa'i
864
bde gshegs snying p0865 [B: rtag
hrtan ther zug] don dam par grub p ~ 6 6 khas blangs pa la! .
bdag nyid chen pos/shes bya chos can
867
I rtag brtan
868
gyi bde gshegs snying p0869 bden par rna
grub par thall de don dam par gcig tu
870
'ang rna grubl du mar yang rna grub pa'i phyirl gsal
b ~ 8 7 1 khas blangsl rtags
872
rna grub na! gcig tu grub na du rna la khyab pa bud! (14a) du mar grub
na gcig yin par
873
bud!
gzhan yang I shes bya chos can! bde gshegs snying po bden ' dzin gyi
874
blo spang dU
875
mi rung
bar thal I de bden par grub pa'i phyirl gsungs
876
pa la! slob dpon blo gros rdo rjesl shes bya chos
can! spros bral du 'dzin pa'i blo
877
spang du mi rung bar thall spros bral
878
yin pa'i phyirl 'khor
gsum khas blangs
879
zer ba la! de 'dra tshig 'dra tsarn yin (54b) snying po rned gsungs
88
01
de dag la sogs pa'i lung rigs du rnas
881
jo nang pa'i grub rntha' la sngar zhugs
882
pa log pa dang I
[B: 'jug pal the tsorn za ba dang
883
1 phyis mi 'jug pa'i 'phrin las
884
rndzad doll
[2.6.3.1J
bdag nyid chen pOS885 dus 'khor chos min gsungs p ~ 8 6 gangs can dU
887
grags na'ang I sgraji
bzhin pa la nang' gal yod gsungs
888
pa las I chos min zhes rna gsungs tel rtsod
889
pari' on kyang
863
864
865
'"
867
."
86'
870
871
.72
873
'7.
.75
876
'77
87.
879
880
881
882
'"
88,
,,,
8"
887
'"
'89
stobssogscompl.: abbr. stobswoA: stobssoDB.
brgyanpa'jA: rgyan'iB; cf. Tshigmdzod chen mo, s.v. rgyanpa- (td.) - brgyanpa, brgyanpa, rgyan
- mdzes chas kyis spras pa.
bdegshegssnyingpocompl.: abbr. bdegshegsnyingpoA: abbr.: bdaiDsnyingoB.
don dam par grub parcompl. : don daM par grub pa: don daM par B.
shes bya chos can compl. : abbr. shes+ya chos can B : abbr. sh+yes chon A.
brtan B : bstan A.
bde gshegs snyjng po compl. : bdalD snyingo B : abbr. bde gsh+yes snying po A.
tuA: duB.
gsaJ ba A : bsaJ khyab B.
rtagscompl.: rtaDB: rtagA.
yjn parcompl. : yjnr B : yin pa A.
'dzingyicompl.: 'dzin+yiB: 'dzin <gyi>A.
spang du A : abbr. spangsu B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. spong ba - 1. (td.) spangs pa, spang ba,
spongs, 'dor ba dang sel ba.
gsungs compl. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
bJoA: bJosB.
spros braJ A : abbr. spr+roJB.
khas bJangs A : <khas bJangs> B.
gsungs compl. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
masB: m+saA.
zhugscompl. : zhuDB : zhug A. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'jugpa2. (tmd.) zhugs pa, 'jugpa -des
su 'brang ba dang 'gro ba.
the tsom za ba dangcompl. : abbr. tbeoM za ba dang B : <tbe tshoM za ba dang> A.
'phrin Jas A : abbr. phris B.
chenposcompl.: abbr. chenosB: {---}osA.
gsungs parcompl. : gs+ya par B : gsung bar A.
duA: naB.
gsungs compl. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
rtsodB : brtsod A, cf. note 83 I .
108 Chapter 5
'phags pas mdzad dam min yang b1a
890
1 legs par bshad pa'ang mang du mthong bas nal thar
'dod mams kyi 'jug ngogs
891
rna yin zhesl kho bo 'di la mtha' geig skur mi 'debs
892
1 zhes
893
dang I 'gal spong du I ding
894
sang gangs
895
ri'i khrod kyi
896
mkhas dom mamsl Idem po'i tigag
(S292) gis
897
zab mo'i tshul ston pal dus kyi 'khor 10'i
898
rgyud 'grel dang beas pa'i tshig la
899
(M210b6) ji bzhin sgra ru mngon zhen pasl
mam dag
900
mdo rgyud tshogs dang 'gal ba yi/
log pa'i
901
ehos lugs mang du spel mthong nasi
'khyog902 po'i shing la srong ba'i tshul bzhin dU
903
1
brgal
904
zhing905 brtag pa'i
906
sgo nas bdag gis bris
907
1
nges don gsal byed
90
' duJ
zhes
908
dang I
(1) , di don ' grel byed mkhas pa gzhan dag gisl
(l4b) snying po dor nas sbun pa yang yang 'phyar'101
rgya mtsho srubs las
911
bdud rtsi
912
ji bzhin du!
yang dag don gyi snying po kho bos blangsl
(2ab) 'dab brgya'i tshal nas sbrang rtsi bung bas len!
ehu dang '0 rna ngang pas so sor
l3
[A: ! <gdas su 'ong>] 'byedf
14
890
891
892
893
894
895
896
897
898
899
900
901
902
903
904
905
906
907
908
909
910
'"
912
913
914
yang bla B : kyang bla A.
ngogscompl.: abbr. ngoDB: ngogA.
skur mi 'debs em. : bkur mi 'debs A : bsklII mi 'debs B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. skur 'debs-
sklII ba 'debs pa ste gzhan la yon tan yod pa mams med pa dang, bzang po mams ngan par beos pa'i
smod tshig. liischke 1881: sklII ba, 1. pf. skur, sometimes for sklII ba 'debs pa.
zhesB: eesA.
ding B : ling A.
gangs B : gang A.
kyiB: 'dir A.
gisA :giR
'khoT lo'i compl. : abbr. 'khaur'i A : abbr. 'khaur R
la B : (-}<la> A.
mam dag compl. : abbr. maMg AB; cf. Bacot no. 359 gives maMg as the abbreviation of mam dag,
not mam bzhag like A'.
logpa'icompl.: 10g'iB: 10gspa'iA.
'khyog A : mkhyog B.
bzhin du compl. : abbr. 4n du B : abbr. bstanas A.
brgal em. : rgal AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. rgal ba (td.) brgal ba, brgal ba, rgol-sgrol ba dang
'da'ba.
zhing A : shing R
brtag pa'i compl. : abbr. brtag'iB : rtag pa 'i A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. rtog pa - 1. (td.) brtags
pa, brtag pa, rtogs - rags par dpyod pa, ... brgal bJtags.
blisA: 'ddsB.
zhes B : ees A.
gsal byed A : abbr. gsaJ+yedB.
'phyarB : pharA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'phyarba- (td.) phyar ba, 'phyar ba,phyor.
lasA: laB.
bdud Jtsi compl. : bduid[tsa Jtags] AR
sosorem.: abbr. saurB: abbr. saurA.
'byedB : <I> A (In ms. A 'byednot placed here, but on p. 55al after the following insertion sngon
Jig Jten ... blangs so, which B omits, and the phrase 'dir shog; see also note 159); cf. Tshig mdzod
chen mo, s.v. gdas pa (td.) - smra ba 'am zhu ba 'am go ba. This phrase gdas su 'ong seems to in-
Text Edition
109
[A: sngon 'jig rten ehags
9
!5 pa'i tshe/lha dang lha rna yin mams kyis'!6 ri rab la srub'I7 smng
byasl klu'i rgyal po norrgyas la srub thag!8 byas nas/rgya mtsho srub'!' pa la/ bdud rtsi bum pa
gang dang I dug ha la bum pa gang dang I zla ba phyed pa gcig dang
920
gsum byung I de'i tshe
bdud rtsi lha mams kyis'2! khyerl dug dbang phyug gis ,thungs
922
pas mgrin pa gnag por song I
zla
923
ba phyed pa lha'i dbang po'i gtsug rgyan ees grags/ de bzhin du dus kyi 'khor lo'i rgya
tsho bsrubs pa
924
las byung ba'i dug 'ga' zhig jo nang pas gsoll drang don gyi zla ba phyed pa
rokhas pa zha lu ba
925
gzhan gyis926 (55a) byis pa mams dga' ba'i rgyan du byasl nges don gyi
bdud rtsi kho bos blangs soil
'dir sho g'27]
(2ed) nor bu ' ching bu ded dpon mkhas
928
pas shesl
(S293) legs bshad nyes bshad mkhas pa'i blo yis rtogsl
(3) yod pa'i legs bshad phrag
29
dog mun pas sgribs
93
01
ined pa'i skyon mams blo ngan mig gis mthong I
gdug pa'i sbrul gyis '0 ma 'thung ba'31 bzhinl
legs bshad bdud rtsis nyon mongs dug 'phel ba'il
(4) legs pa'i'32 rgyun phyogs gzhol ba'i
933
blo ngan mamsl
legs bshad ehu Ion stong gis mi Idog
34
medl
gzur'35 gnas blo ldan 'ga' yis
936
'di mthong na
937
1
yid la 'bab ' gyur snyam nas ngas ' di sbyarl zhes gsungsf38
'15
916
917
918
91.
920
921
922
923
92.
925
926
927
928
929
930
931
932
933
93.
935
936
937
938
traduce the following insertion.
chagsem. : chagA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. jigrten chags tshul
kyis em. : kyi A.
srub em. : smbs A.
smb thagem. : bsmb tbag A; cf. liischke 1881: thag pa I. Aope, cord.
smbem. : bsmbA.
gdgdangcompl.: abbr. 1 dangA.
kyis em. : kyi A.
gis 'tbungs pa em. : gi mthung+s A; cf. liischke 1881: 'thung ba, pf. 'thungs.
ziacompl.: {-}ziaA.
pa compl. : pa {-} A.
zha iu ba compl. : <zha iu ba> A.
gyisem. : gyi A.
'byed< 'dir shag> A. (marks the end of the insertion as mentioned above, cf. note 914).
mkhasB: {--} <mkhas>A.
phragem. :phraAB.
pas sgrjbs B : pas+glibs A.
'tbung ba em. : 'thungs pa B : mtbung ba A; cf. note 922.
iegspa'icompl.: ieD'iB: iagpa'iA.
gzhai ba 'i A : gzhaM pa 'iB.
idagA: JdaDB.
gzur A : zur B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gzur gnas - phyags su ma ihung baJ drang par gnas
pa 'am gzu bar gnas pa.
yisB :yiA.
naA: nasB.
zhes gsungs compl. : abbr. zhesungs B : abbr. ces+ya A.
110 Chapter 5
de ltar mdo rgyud btan bcos de dag gi dgongs pa dang mthun na ga la 'gegs
939
I chos sku rtag
brtan
940
ther zug tu 'dod pa rgya bod bal gsum gang du yani
42
rna byung zhing I da
yang Ita ba ngan pa la 'jug pa rgyu<f>43 gcod pa'i
944
phyir dgag pa mdzad del
(1) bde
945
legs sa bon yon tan kun gyi gzhi
946
1
yang dag Ita ba'i nor mchog 'phroi
47
byed cing I
thar pa'i srog rtsa gcod byed pa yi/
lta ngan las lhag 'phuni
49
byed dgra gzhan medl
(2) Ita ngan dman pa'i tha<f>50 la mngon zhen zhini
51
I
rtag chad mthar lta'i wa skad cher sgrog pal
'di dag ngur smrig rgyal mtshan 'chang na yang I
thub pa'i bstan la mu stegs
952
than skyel yin! zhes gsungsf
53
[2.6.3.2J
de dus jo nang pa'i (ISa) pho rus pa gcig gis Idoi
54
na yar 'ongs
955
pasl mkhas pa gzhon blo
956
dpon slob mams 'byon gyi 'dug zer ba thos nasi jonang pa la nga mi gcii
57
yod med [khyad
958
]
medl kho gsod
959
na jo nang pa'i dgra sgo960 lcags 'dug bsams
962
nasi dbu la rdo rdeg
939
940
941
942
943
944
945
94'
947
948
949
950
951
952
953
954
955
956
957
958
959
9'0
961
962
'gegs em. : 'geg AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'gegs pa - 'gog pa 'i da Ita ba 'bri tshuJ gzhan
zhig; Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'gog pa 1. (td.) bkag pa, dgag pa, khog 1) rgyun gcod pa. Jiischke
1881: 'geg(s) pa pt: bkag, fut. dgag, imp. khogto hinder, prohibit, stop.
brtan B : stan A; ct: Nitartha, s.V. rtag brtan ther zugs- permanent, stable, and unchanging.
sngar B : <sngar> A.
yang B: 'ang A.
rgyudA : rgyun B.
gcodpa'icompl.: abbr. gcod'iB: gcadpa'iA.
bdeB: dgeA.
gzhiB: 4A.
ct: note 448.
gcodparA: abbr. spyodrB.
'phung em. : phung AB; ct: Jiischke 1881: phung bav. 'phung ba; Jiischke 1881: 'phung ba, 'phung
bar byed pa, 'phung la sbyor ba, prob. also gtong ba, Jug pa - ro ruin, to undo. Tshig mdzod chen mo,
s.v. 'phung ba 1. (tmd.) phung ba, 'phung ba 1) nyams nyes 'byung ba'am, nyams rgud 'byung ba.
thad em. : thed AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. thad -gang de'i skor dang, phyogs. Goldstein 2001,
s.v. thad-I. (gen. + -) concerning, about.
zhing B : cing A.
mustegscompl.: abbr. mu+eDB: mustegA.
zhes gsungs corilpl. : abbr. zhesungs B : abbr. ccs+ya A.
Idog A : mdog B.
'ongs B : yong+s A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'ong ba 1. (tmd.) 'ongs pa, 'ong ba - yong ba.
bl0 A : bl0 ba B.
nga mi gcigem. : nga mi 1 B : nga {-} mi 11a A.
khyadem. : om. AB
gsodem. : sodAB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gsodpa(td.) bsadpa,'gsadpa, sodl) srog gcodpa.
sgoA:mgoB.
lcagsparcompl. : chogparB : abbr. chog+spa A; ct: Goldstein 2001, s.v. chogs-imp. of 'chag(to
walk). '
bsamscompl. : abbr. bsaMsB : abbr. bsaM A; cf. Tshigmdzod chen mo, s.v. semspa-l. (td.) bsams
pa, bsam pa, soms.
Text Edition
111
pa'i
963
dam bca' byas 'ongst
64
drung pa dang mja1965 bas Ius rengsl sems dran pa nyams nas
brdeg
966
pa rna byung I kho dran pa myed pa dang I dge bshes
967
zil can gcig 'dug snyaill'68 pa
byung I dus phyis drung pa la dad nas mtho1
969
bshags
970
kyang phul bar grags soil
IB: 'bri khung 10 tstsha bas kyang jo nang pa'i pho rus byas nasi bdag nyid chen po sreg pa'i
sbyin sreg gi thab brtsigs
97l
sreg grabs byas pa'i tshe na yang I nam mkhar rni dkar po gcig
mngon sum du byung nasi de khyod kyis bsregs kyang rni 'tshig mam smin chen po pog pas rna
byed zer nas 'phro la bzhag dgos byung bar gragsl]
(55b) bzang Idan du bka,972 bcu pa yon tan gyis
973
1 jo nangpala bka' skyonmdzad pa'di lal sdig
pa chen po'ong ba
974
'dra zhus pas/bdag (S294) niyd chen po'i gsung nas/'di 'dra zer ba shin tu
roang stel de ' dra ga la yin! sngon 'jig rten du ston pa byon pa'i dus sui lhas
975
byin la sogs pa'i
bdud [kyi] ris
976
mams dang I mu stegs
977
kyi ston pa drug gsum bco brgyad la sogs [B: pa phyi
ro1
978
pal mams la zhe sdang dang
79
khong khro dpag tu med pa
980
skyes pa'i sdig pa yang
8l
ston pa la'ong
982
ngarn/ de'i rjes su rgyan
983
drug mchog gnyis la sogs p ~ 8 4 byon pa la I nag
phyogs mams rni dga' bar gyur pa'i sdig pa'ang
85
de dag la 'ong ngarn/ khyad par (lSb) du
'phags pa klu Sgrub
986
byon nas theg pa chen po'i sral phye ba lal rang bde
987
gnyis kas theg
963
964
965
966
967
968
969
970
97!
972
973
974
975
976
977
978
979
980
981
982
983
984
985
986
987
rdo rdeg pa'i A : re brdog'i B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. 1. rdeg pa - (td.) brdegs pa, brdeg pa,
rdegs - rgyag pa dang, rdllng ba.
'ongs B : yongs A.
mjal em. : jal A: 'byaIB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. mjal ba (td.) mjal ba, mjal ba, mjol- thllg
'phrad byed pa 'i zhe sa.
brdeg A : rdeg B.
dge bshes campI. : abbr. dgais AB.
snyamB: snyaMsA.
mthol A: 'thoIB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.y. 'thol ba - mthol ba dang 'dra.
bshagscompI.: abbr. bshaDB: bshagA. .
brtsigsem. : rtsigsB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. rtsig pa 1. (td.) brtsigs pa, brtsigpa, rtsigs -rtsig
pargyagpa.
bka'B :kaA.
gyis B : gyi A.
'ong ba B : yong pa A.
lhasem. : IhaAB; cf. Mvy, s.y. 3610: lhas byin- devadatta.
bdlld kyi risem. : bdlld risB : bdlld ng A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, S.Y. bdlld kyi ris- bdlldkyi sde;
bdlld = mara.
mil stegs campI. : abbr. mlleD B : mllg rteg A; cf. liischke 1881: mil stegs pa, also mil stegs can (SkI.
tlrthika).
phyi raf campI. : abbr. phyiofB.
dangA: am. B.
tu med pa campI. : tu med <pa> A : med pa B.
yang B : am. A.
'ong B : yong A.
rgyan A : brgyan B.
la sogs pa campI. : abbLloD pa B: abbr. lasogs A.
'ang A : yang B.
kill sgrub A : kIu grob B.
bde A : sde B; here abbr. of rang gzhan bde ba.
112 Chapter 5
chen
988
ni
989
bka' rninzhes/ skurba
990
btab pa'i sdig pa yang / 'phags mchogklu sgrub 13"91 'ong
ngam/ nyi ma'i dkyil ' k h O ~ 9 2 shar ba'i tshe/ 'byung po'i bya mams long ba rten 'breI gyi chos
nyid yin zhing
993
/ guam thig drang par rgyab
994
na sgur po ras su 'thon
995
pa lugs yin! blun po 'i
lab de 'dra
996
rna zer gsungs
997
/
sdom gsum rab dbye las/
(1) sangs rgyas 'jig rten byorr98 pa dang /
mkhas mams bshad pa byed pa la!
'bras bU
999
mam gsum 'byung ba 'di/
sangs rgyas bstan pa'i spyi lugs yin/lOOO
(2) mkhas pa mams kyis
100l
chos bshad na!
chos log spyod pa 'pham
1002
byed cing /
bdud riS!003 thams cad yi mug 'gyur/
mkhas pa thams cad dga' bar byed/
'di 'dras bstan pa 'dzin par byed nus
1004
/
lta tshe chOS100
6
slm rtag brtan 'dod!
sgom tshe ci
1007
snang chos skur spyod!
988
989
990
991
992
993
994
995
996
997
998
999
1000
1001
1002
1003
1004
1005
1006
1007
thegchenem.: abbr. thaigAB.
niA: am. B.
skur ba em. : skur pa A : bskur pa B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. skur ba - 1. (td.) bskur ba, bskur
ba, skur 2. yod bzhin du med par bshad pa dang, yon tan yin bzhin du skyon char brtsis pa 'i smod
tshig.
'phags mchog kiu sgmb Ja em.: 'phaD mchog skiu sgrub Ja B : bdag nyid chen po <Ja> A.
dkyiJ 'khorcompI. : abbr. dkyior AB.
zhing B : cing A.
rgyabA: gyabB.
'thon A : mthon B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. ras su bor ba - Ias su dnogs su 'thon pa. Goldstein
2001, s.v. ras su bOI- va. to shunl avoidJ not do well.
'dmB: 'dra baA.
gsungs campI. : abbr. gs+ya B : abbr. s+ya A.
byon B: 'byon A.
'bras bu campI. : abbr. 'bros AB.
Same in Kun dga' rgyal mtshan (2002: 327, v.634).
mams kyis campI. : abbr. maMs kyis A : abbr. maMs+yiB.
'pham em. : pham AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. 'pham pa (tmd.) pham pa, 'pham pa - pha IOJ
gyi do zJa ma Jon par zhumpa. Jiischke 1881: 'phampa - to be beaten, conqured; 'phampar byedpa
- to beat, to defeat, to conquer.
ris B : rig A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. bdud kyi ris - bdud kyi sde.
byed nus em. : byed A: nusB. Cf. Kun dga' rgyal mtshan (2002: 328, v. 636b-d and v. 637a-b).
zhes so campI. : abbr. zheso B : abbr. ceso A. Cf. Same Kun dga' rgyal mtshan (2002: 327, v.636b-d
and 637a-b).
chos B : <chos> A.
ciA: cirB.
Text Edition
113
chos sku rgyud Idan Ius can kunl
las kyi 'khor bar 'khyam pa
1008
mtshar
lO09
I
[B: ! roro bar skabs kyi tshigs bead doll]
[2.6.4]
inkhan chen g.yag pasl sems can thams cad sangs rgya/lOll 'khor ba la zad pamed gsung ba/lOl2
(S295) gsung balOl3 Ia/ bdag nyid chen posl sems can
10l4
thams cad 'tshang rgya1015 bar tshad mas
nges par thaI! der tshad mas grub pa'i phyirl zhes gsungs pasl g.yag pas khyab pa rna grub
gsungs nas tshur Idog pasl rtags
1016
rna grub la sogs pa'i 'phen len mang dU
lOl7
mdzad na'angl
don la rton pa'i
lOl8
(56a) mkhas pamams bdag nyid chen po'i rigs
10l9
pa la mnyes shingl tshig la
rton
1020
pa'i mkhas pa mams mkhan chen g.yag pa'i rigs
lO21
pa la mnyes par grags soil
[2.6.5]
chos rje 10 tstsha ba dang I karma ba
lO22
dkon gzhon gnyis kun rdzob tu yod pas yod pa'i (l6a) go
chod mi chod la rtsod
1023
pa mdzad pasl rtsod
1024
pa bre
1025
mo byung bar
1026
10 tstsha ba'i gsung
nas donrtsod
1027
ni mi'ong
1028
bar 'dug/tshig la snying po [B: tsam] med pasl drungpamams '0
brgyal
1029
gzhan mams yang
1030
thugs dam chag
1031
pas bzhud gsungs
1032
1
1008
1009
1010
1011
1012
1013
1014
10]5
1016
1017
1018
1019
lO2D
1021
1022
lO23
1024
1025
1026
1027
1028
1029
10)0
1031
1032
paB : parA.
mtshar B: 'tshang A.
B 15b4: A 'snake stroke' (sbrul shad) which usually marks the end of a section of text (cf. note 159)
similarly to ms. A (see note 379) marks the insertion afthis extra line.
sangs rgya compl. : abbr. sarlya A: 'tshang rgya B.
gsung ba B : abbr. s+ya pa A.
gsung ba B : abbr. s+ya pa A.
sems can compl. : abbr. senM AB.
'tshang rgyaB : abbr. sar+yaA (= sangs rgya); cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'tshang rgya ba- sangs
rgyas pa 'j ma 'ongs da Jta gnyjs.
rtagscompl.: rtaDB: rtagA.
duA: suB.
rtonpa'hm.: stonpa'iB: stonpaA.
dgs em. : dg AB.
rton em. : ston AB.
dgsem.: dgAB.
karma ba em. : kalInA <pa> A : skar ma B.
rtsodB : brtsod A; cf. note 831.
rtsodB : brtsod A; cf. note 831.
bre mo byung bar em. : 'grel mo byung par A: 'dre mo ma byung bar B; cf. llischke 1881: bre mo-
unifit, useless, worthless.
barB : parA.
rtsod B : brtsod A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. don med - don 'bras med pa 'am dgos don med
pa, ... don med rtsod slong.
'ong B : yongs A; cf. note 955.
brgyal A : rgyalB.
mams yangcompl. : abbr.: maMs+yang B : mams A.
chag B : 'chags A; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.y. sems shugs chag-yi. to loose enthusiasm, to get discoura-
ged.
gsungs campI. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
114
Chapter 5
de nas bdagnyid chen pos drung pa '0 brgyal/!033 bdag gis rtsod
1034
pas chog gsungS!03S nas thaI
'gyur 'gal 'phangs
l036
pasl kanna ba
lo37
la zug par thams cad kyi
l038
mthun snang du grubl
drung gi gsung
l039
nasi dbus gtsang
l040
gi dge bshes chen por grags pa mams kyang I don rgyab
'gal [B: la] song yang tshig phyogs tsam 'grig nalrang re rtsod
l041
rgyu med! grub mtha' mthun
zhes smral
1042
don gcig kyang tshig!043 cung zad
l044
mi mthun!045 nal mgo byang mthug tu
l046
song song
l047
rtsod kyin 'dug ste
1048
de 'dra la snying po medl drung 10 tstsha ba
l049
yang I rigs
pas rna dpyad par kun rdzob tu
lOSO
yod pasl yod pa'i go mi chod ni mi gsungl gsung na chad Ita
bar
lOSl
'gyurl karma ba
l052
yang rigs pas dpyad nas kyang kun (S29.6) rdzob tu
lOS3
yod na yod
pa'i
l054
go chod par mi 'dod! 'dod
los5
na rtag Har 'gyurl gzhong stong la khyi 'thab mi dgos par
gda,lOS6 gsungs/
lOS7
[2.6.6]
de dus nyan mkhanmams narel bla ma'i zhabs tog tu!OS8 'gro balrang gi blo gros kyi nus palOS9
thon pal ngo mtshar
1060
che zhes
l061
shin tu dad par gyur toll
1033
1034
1035
1036
1037
1038
1039
1040
1041
1042
1043
1044
1045
1046
1047
1048
1049
1050
1051
1052
1053
1054
1055
1056
1057
10S8
1059
1060
1061
brgyal A : rgyalB.
rtsodB : brtsod A.
gsungs campI. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
'gal 'phangs campI. : abbr. 'ga 'phangs A: 'ga' 'phangs B.
kanna ba em. : karmA ba A : skar ma pa B.
kyi A : <kyi> B.
gi gSling B : abbr. gisung A.
gtsang A : rtsang B.
rtsodB : brtsod A.
mtha'mthun zhes smra B : abbr. mtha'thun ces+mra A.
tshig B : tshigs A.
cung zadB : abbr. cungd A.
mimthun A: abbr. mithun B.
mthllg tuem. : thuD du A: dug duB; cf. A': mthug tu; Goldstein 2001, s.y. mthugpo-l. thick.
song song B : abbr. saling A.
rtsodkyin 'dugsteem. :rtsodkyin 'dligteB: brtsodkyin 'dugsteA.
Seenote 528.
kun rdzob tll em. : abbr. kuob[tsa rtags] du B : kun rdzobs du A.
Ita bar B : Itar A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. chad Ita - las 'bras dang, skye ba snga phyi sogs med
par smra ba 'i Ita ba.
kanna ba A : skar ma pa B.
tuA: duB.
pa'iB : pas A.
mi 'dod, 'dod A : mi 'dodB.
gda'A: bda'B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. gda' - 'dug gam yodpa, ... gzugs gzhi bde po gda' lags.
gSlli1gs compl. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
tu em. : du AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. zhabs tog 1) bsnyen bkur.
paA :pasB.
ngomtsharA: ngor[tsartags]B.
zhesB: zheA.
Text Edition
115
stag lung 10 tsatsha ba sakya
1062
bzang gis bka'.I063 bzhi pa cigI064 btang nasi nged rgyan drug gi
dgongs pa gcig tu 'dod pa yin! khyed ji ltar bzhed
lO65
zhus pas/ de la nges pa medl geig pa mams
ni gcig mi geig pa mams ni mi gcig par byas pas ' ong gsungS/I066
khong
I067
na ref khyed mkhas pa chen po lags pas/ thag ehod pa'i zha1lta gnang dgos zhes (16b)
nan gyis zhus pas/ dgongs pa e gcig (56b) mi gciglO
68
, di la shes modi klU
lO69
sgrub yab sras rjes
'brang dang beas pas
1070
/ thogs
lO71
med sku mehed rjes 'brang dang beas pa'i lugs 'gegs par
1072
'dug! thogs
1073
med sku mehed
lO74
rjes 'brang dang beas pas/ klu Sgrub
lO75
yab sras rjes 'brang
, dang beas pa'i lugs 'gegs par
1076
'dug! de la thugs bsam
1077
btang bas
lO78
shes/ lar dbu rna palO79
. dang dngos smra ba gnyis
1080
grub mtha' geig nal dgongs pa mi geig pa bya ba su yod pa yin!
,zhes gad mo eher mdzodl
,slob dponbka' beu pa darmas
lO81
yid ehes 'bras rtags
lO82
bla rna rin po ehe pa'i de dngos10
83
yin
'par gda' 1084 lags zhus pas/ khyed kyi de da dung skyor dang gsung bskyarlO
85
basi grub
1086
mtha'
'de bzung
1087
nalkhanagbabs la
lO88
'gro bar 'dug gsungs
1089
/khong gislO90 'gro bar gyur gcigees
1062
1063
,1064
[065
,1066
shAkya em. : shAka A : shaka B.
gis bka'B: gi (b)ka' A.
gcig A : cig B.
jiItar bzhedB : abbr.j+tir 'dod A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. bzhedpa - 1. (td.) 2) 'dodpa'i zhe
sa.
gsungs compl. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
[061 . khongA: khoB; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, S.v. khong-kho!izhesa.
1068
1069
1070
1011
[072
1073
[014
1075
1076
[011
1078
1079
1080
1081
1082
1083
[084
108S
1086
1087
1088
1089
[090
dgongs pa e gcig mi gcigcompl. : abbr. dgongs pa e 1 mi 1 B : abbr. d<g>ongs pa e 1 mi 1 A.
Jdu A : sklu B.
pasB :paA.
thogscompl.: thoDB: thogA.
gegsparcompl.: abbr. geDrB: gegparA; cf. note 939.
thogscompl.: thoDB: thogA.
sku mched A : abbr. wedB.
Jdu sgrub A : abbr. Jdrob B.
lugs gegs parcompl. : IuD geDr B : lug geg par A; cf. above.
thugs bsam compl. : abbr. thugsaM A : abbr. th+ya bsaMB.
basB :pasA.
paB: baA.
gnyis compl. : 2 A : om. B.
masB:maA.
Itagscompl.: rtaDB: ItagA.
dngos A : ngos B.
gda'A: bda'B.
bskyarA: skyarB; cf. Jaschke 1881: skyarbav. skyorba;skyorba- 1. vb. pf. & ft. bskyar3.to
repeat.
grub A: sgrub B; cf. Jaschke 1881: grub pa, grub mtha' (siddhiinta); Mvy, S.v. grub pa'i mtha'-
siddhiinta.
bzung A : zung B.
babs la em. : sbablaB: sbabsA; cf. Tshigmdzod chen mo, s.v. khanagpo 2) khami dro'am bkrami
shispa. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. kha babs-kha'igshiskasteskad cha'i babs. Goldstein 2001, s.v.
babs 3. in accordance with, considering. Note that kha nag po is the opposite of kha dro po - so-
mething that brings positive changes, that is auspicious, sm. to Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. kha dro ba
-bkrashispa'amlegspo 'ongba;cf. notes 2439, 2441.
'duggsungscompl.: abbr. 'duggs+yaB :gsungA.
gisB:giA.
116 Chapter 5
gsungs
1091
nasi smon lam 'debs na sku dbang chel rigs pas Idog tu mi btub
lO92
zhus (8297) pasl '0
na SgugslO93 gcig gsungs
1094
nasi thaI 'gyur gcig 'phangslO
95
pasl 'khor gsum dngos 'gal dU
1096
song [B: zhing]/lo zla bar bsarns bsams
lO97
pa tsho skad cig ma re la 'khur rgyug gsungs/10
98
de dus dbus pa'i dge bshes kun na rei blo bzang pa 'jam dbyangs kyi zhal gzigsl gar gshegs su
dpe cha mdzo rgyab che chung bcu bzhi
1099
bkal nas nyin mtshan med par gzigs pa'i grub mtha'
skyor bzang po dar ma Ita bus skyar ba
1100
skad cig re la bshig gtong bas;t 101 'jigs su rung zhes
ha las par gyur toll
[2.6.7]
mal 'byor gyi dbang phyug mi la ras chen la sogs pa sngon gyi phyag chen pa 'ga' yis sku tshe
snga ma la
llo2
yang dang
1103
yang du sbyangs shing I sku tshe 'dir yang dung sems dbang du
'dus tel (Ha) gang byung gis chog na ci byas kyang sla ba mal 'byor pa'i spyod pa mdzad pa la
'khrul gzhill04 byas tel ding sang gi phyag chen par bsgom pa phalmo che mams nil lhag pa
l105
tshul khrims kyi bslab
llo6
pa la gces spras su mdzad pa'i
l107
dam pa mams kyi lugsl nyan thos
kyi lugs yin zhes khyad du bsad
1108
nas (S7a) 'khor 'das kyi chos tharns cad stong zhing bdag med
pa yin
1109
zhes tshig tu smra yang I don la bdag dang bdag gir
lllO
'dzinpa'i gnyenpor cung zad
kyang mi 'gro ba 'di dag ni chad par Ita ba yin te/lta bas spyod pa khyad
lll1
du bsad nasi bag
med pa'i spyod palalhurlenpalas chad par Ita ball 12 gzhanmed/ 'di dagni so sorrtogpa'i shes
1091
1092
1093
1094
1095
1096
1091
1098
1099
1100
1101
1102
1103
1104
1105
1106
1107
1108
1109
1110
llli
1112
ees gsungs comp!. : abbr. eesungs B : ees gsung A.
fdag tu mi btub em. : fdag mi btub A : fdag tu mi tub B; cf. Jaschke 1881: btub, Lex. = rung, fit,
conyinient, practicable, becoming. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. btub pa - bfa 'am rung ba dang thub pa.
sgugs em. : sgur B : dgug A; imp. of sgug pa - to wait.
gsungs comp!. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
'phangs B: 'phang A.
du A : <fa> B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. dngas 'gaf- 'gal ba gang zhig phan tshun dngas su mi
mthun par gnas pa, rtag mi rtag dang, snang ba dang mun pa fta bu '0.
bsamsbsamscompl.: bsaMsbsaMsB: bsaMbsaMA.
cig ma re fa 'khur rgyug gsungs em. : abbr. 1 ma re fa khur rgyug gsung B : abbr. 1 Ie la khur rgyug-
sung A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'khu ba 1. (tmd.) 2) (mying) fdog pa.
dpe eha mdzo rgyab cbe chung beu bzhi em. : dpe' eha mdzo rgyab ehe eung 4 A : dpe eha 'dzo rgyab
beu 4B; cf. Jaschke 1881: mdzo-mongrel-breed of the yak-bull and common cow, whilst 'bd mdzo
is the hybrid ofa common bull and a yak-cow.
skyar ba B : skyar ba la A; cf. Jaschke 1881: skyar ba y. skyor ba; better: skyor ba.
re fa bshig gtong bas em. : re fa bshig stong ba B : ma<r> la bshig gtong pas A; Tashi Tsering: sm. to
storba.
mafaem.: maA: laB.
dang A : om. B.
gzhiB: bzhi A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'khrul gzhi -nor 'khrul byung ba'i rgyu rkyen.
lhagpaB: lha<g> parA; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.y.lhagpa tshulJchrims kyi bsfab pa -so thards
bdun gyi sdom khrims dang byang chub sems dpa 'i tshul khrims gsum beas.
bsfab A : slab B.
pa'iA :paB.
zhes khyad du bsadB : zhes {--} khyad du bsad A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s. y. khyad du gsod pa
- mi rtsi ba dang, bmyas beos byed pa 'am, 'dzem bag med pa.
payinA: <payin>B.
bdaggircompl.: abbr. bdagirAB.
khyadB : khyad {med} A.
baA:rgyuB.
Text Edition
117
rab kyis dpyad nas gnas lugs kyi don sgom
ll13
pa'rtog sgom skyon can du byed cing I yid la
byed pa thams cad bkag ste
l1l4
1 mi rtog pa (S298) 'thoms
lll5
po sgom pa la skyon med kyi sgom
du byed par snang stell
16
1 lugs 'di ni bstanpa las phyi ral du gyur par ting 'dzin
lll7
rgyal po las
1
1118
gsungs te
(1) 'jig rten pa dag ting 'dzin
1119
sgom byed kyang I
dellZo ni bdag tu 'dzin1121 pa bzhig
1l22
mi nusl
deS ni nyon mongs ches cher rab tu 'khrugsl
!hag spyod kyis
ll23
ni ting 'dzin 'dir sgom bzhinl
l124
(2) gal te chos la bdag med so sor rtog
so sor de rtag
1l25
sgom par byed pa nil
de ni
1l26
my a ngan 'das thob 'bras bu'i1127 rgyu!
rgyu gzhan gang yin del 128 ni zhi mi 'gyurl
zhes 1129 dang I
gang dag dran pa dang yid byed bkag
l130
nasi mun pa la mig cer ltas byas te had sgom byed pa
dang I mtshan rna ci yang [B: yid la] mi byed pari mam rtog
ll31
thol skyes (l7b) rbad chod byed
pa nil rgya nag ha shang gi ring lugs rna nor ba
l132
'dzin pa yin gsungs
l133
I ding sang gi sgom
chen pa 'ga' shig shin tu las sla ba
l134
bar do zin pa yod zer ba mang ste
ll35
1 nyin par gyi
l136
snang ba 'di la a 'thas na
l137
1 rmi lamgyi 'khrul pami zinl rmi lam rna zin pari 138 bar do'i 'khrul
1113
1114
IllS
1116
lIt7
1118
1119
1120
1I2!
1122
1113
1124
1125
1126
1127
1128
1129
1130
1131
1132
il33
1134
1135
1136
1137
1138
sgom compl. sgoMB : bsgoM A.
steem.: teAB.
'thomsem.: thomB: abbr. thoMA; cf. Jiischke 1881: thomspav. 'thomspa; 'thom(s)pa, thomspa,
to be dim, dull, clouded (ofthe senses and the understanding).
snang ste B : gnang te A.
ting 'dzin A : tingeni[tsa rtags}B.
gsungs te B : gsungs ste A.
ting 'dzin compl. : abbr. tingni A : abbr. tingeni[tsa rtags}B.
deA: desB.
'dzin A : abbr. 'in B.
bzhigA: zhigB; cf. note 1100.
kyis A : kyiB.
bzhin B : <g>zhin A.
rtag A : brtag B.
niA:nyidB.
'bras bu'iB : abbr. 'bros A.
deA: desB.
zhesB: cesA.
bkag B : abbr. bkaD A.
roam rtogcompl. : abbr. roaM rtog A : abbr. rooMg B.
baA: barB.
gsungs compl. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
shin tu las sla ba em. : shin tu las sla A : shi tung las bla B.
steB: teA.
par gyi em. : par kyi A : bar gyiB.
'thas na B : mthas nas A.
nni lam ma zin par B : abbr. nniM <roa> zin par A.
118 Chapter 5
snang mi zinJ TO kha gdangs la1l39 grog gnam
1l40
babs la 'ong dUTe
l141
kyang mi 'ong gsungs
1l42
1
de la sogs te lung [dang] rigs I 143 pa du ma'i sgo nas Slll phyung basi sngar zhugs
l144
pa ldog pa
dangl 'jug pa the tshom za ba dang I phyil145 mi 'jug pa la sogs pa'i 'phrin las
l146
mdzad Goll
(1) mtha' gnyis spangs
1147
pa'i chu gter la gnas te
1148
1
gdengsl149 can dbang po (57b) klu sgrub ring lugs 'dzinl
kho bo'i lta zer
l150
'bar ba'i gzi brjid la!
phas rgol 'dab stong gis ni rgol
115l
mi nusl
(2) 'jig
1152
tshogs Ita ri spo mtho 'joms
l153
byed pa'i!
lung rigs rdo rje'i gnam (S299) 1cags
1154
stong yod kyang I
rmongs
l155
pa'i go cha sra brtan cher bgos
1156
pa'il
skye bo ' di la bdag gis ci byar yod! ces gsungs SOll57 II
[B: chos ]1158 bstod pari
khyod ni rtsod
l159
pa mdzad tshe'ang
1l60
dag pa dang I
rgya che
1l6l
gzu bor gnas pa'i blo gros kyisl
1139
1140
1141
1142
1143
1144
1145
1146
1147
1148
1149
t150
1151
1152
1153
1154
1155
1156
1157
1158
1159
1160
1161
la A: <la> B; c Jaschke 1881: gdang ba - to open wide, mouth and nostrils, to gape. Tshig mdzod
chen mo, s.y. gdang ba (td.) gdangs pa, gdang ba, gdongs - phye ba.
grog gnam compl. : grog gnaMB : abbr. grognaM A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. grog2) glo bur
du byung ba'i bza ' btung ngam longs spyod.
babs la 'ong du re em. : babs la 'ong du res B : abbr. babsu yong du re A.
'ong gsungscompl. : abbr. 'ong gs+yaB: yongsgsungA; cf. note 955.
rigs em. : rig AB.
zhugs compl. : zhuD B : zhug A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'jug pa 2. (tmd.) zhugs pa, 'jug pa,
zhugs - ljes su 'brang ba dang 'gIo ba.
phyiA :phyisB.
palasogs pa'i 'phrin lascompl. : abbr.pa laswo pa'i 'phrinsA: abbr. <pala sogspa> 'iphris B.
spangs B : spang A.
teB: steA.
gdengsA: gdengB; cf. SCD, s.Y. gdeng ba = 'phyarba-to raise, to lift.
zer A : gzer B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. zer I. 'od kyi zer mdangs.
rgol 'dab stong gis ni rgol em. : sgol 'dab stong gis ni sgol A : rgol 'dab bzang stong gis 'gong B.
'jig em. : 'jigs A: 'jiD B.
'jomscompl. : 'joMsB : 'joM A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'joms pa- (td.) bcompa, gzhompa,
chom - 'gems pa 'am 'jig par byed pa.
gnam leags compl. : gnaM leaD B : gnaM leag A.
Imongs B : Imong A.
bgos B : dgos A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. go bgo - go cha gyon pa. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y.
bgo ba 1. (td.) bgos pa, bgo ba, bgos 1) gyonpa.
ces gsungs so compl. : abbr. ces+yo A : abbr. ceszmgs B.
Cf. note 642.
rtsodB: brtsodA.
'ang B : <'ang> A.
che A : chen B.
Text Edition 119
gzhan gyi1162 phyogS1163 las mam par rgyal ba
1164
ste
1165
1
khyod la g.yo ba nam yang mnga' rna lagsl zhes
1166
dang I
smra ba ngan mamS tshar gcod paV
sun 'byin bgyid pa'i gnas mams lal
skyon yang yon tan Ita bU
1167
dang I
yon tan skyon Itar snang ba yil
yang dag pa dang Itar snang gil
mampar dbye ba'ang legs parbstan/
de Har log par ' gro ba bkag ces dang 1
1168
(1) stong nyid seng (l8a) ge'i ngaro cher sgrog1169 shing I
lung dang rigs 1 170 pa'i niche sder rab bsgrad de
l17l
1
log par smra ba'i wa tshogs pham byas nasi
thub mchog
l172
bstan pa gangs ri legs par ' dzin/
(2) de
ll73
phyir da Ita 'dzin ma'i
ll74
khyon 'di nal
che bar rlom pa mang du snang mod kyang I
blo chen ' di ni ' dzam gling rgyan
ll75
gcig purl
gzur gnas blo ldan mams kyisl176 nges par gyisl
[2.7 Verse 7]
[7] lung rtogs yon tan thabs nikhas thugs rje yisl
gdul bya'i khams dang bsam pa bag la nyal!
1162
1163
1164
1l6S
1166
1167
1168
1169
1170
1171
1112
117J
1174
1175
1176
1177
gyiB : gyis A.
phyogscomp!. :phyoDB :phyogA.
baA: basB.
steA : naB.
zhes B : ces A.
Ita bu comp!. : abbr. Itu AB.
Source of these seven lines: dPalidan bia ma dam pa ku mil ra ma ti'i yon tan des su dran nas cung
zad bstod pa, in Tsong kha pa 'i bka' 'bum thor bu, gSung 'bum, vo!. kha, p. 6b6-7 al. See also bio
bstodparp. 97. Cf. Toh. 5274 (4) A euiogytoKumiiramati, thechiefteacherofTsongkhapa. Note that
these seven lines also match with Ye shes rgyal mtshan 901.20-22 and continue there with the lines of
the bio bstod paron p. 126.
sgrog A : groD B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sgrog pa (td.) 1. bsgrags pa, bstrag pa, sgrogs-
khyab par shod pa. Jiischke 1881: sgrog pa - to call (out), to publish, proclaim, promulgate, to preach.
rigs em. : rigAB.
bsgrad de A : bgrad te B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. bsgrad pa (td.) bsgrad pa, bsgrad pa, bsgrad
1) gdangs pa. Jiischke 1881: bsgrad pa Lex. = bgrad pa; Jiischke 1881: bgrad pa 1. to open wide.
mchog B : abbr. mchoD A.
deA: de'iB.
ma'iB: {-}<ma>'iA.
rgyanA: brgyanB.
kyis B : kyi A.
zhes so comp!. : abbr. zheso B : abbr. ceso A.
120 Chapter 5
ji bzhin mkhyen pa
ll78
chos kyi 'khoT 10 bskor/
ll79
skalldan rjes 'dzin khyod 1a phyag 'tsha11011
zhes
1180
pa nil de ltar gong du bstan
1181
pa'ilung rigs
l182
kyi yon tan phun sum tshogs
l183
shingl
gzhan rjes su 'dzinpa'i thabs mkhas dang
l184
thugs rje
l185
chen po mnga' basi gdul bya'i khams
theg pa che chung gi
l186
rigs so sor mkhyen zhing
l187
1 bsam pa [B: dang] dbang po rno rtul
l188
dang I bag la(s30o) nyal nyonmongs [B: pal shas che chungji Ita ba bzhin du mkhyen zhing
l189
1
chos kyi 'khor 10 rang rang gi skal ba
l190
ji Ita ba bzhin du theg
l19l
pa che chung I chos rgyas
ll92
'bring bsdus (58a) pa sde snod gsum la sogs [B: pal gang la gang 'os kyi zab cing rgya che ba'i
chos bstan pal
193
1 srnin grol thar pa dang I thams cad mkyen pa'i lamphyin ci rna log par bstan
nasi skalldan gyi gdul bya [B: la] mtha' yas
1194
parjes su bzung
l195
ba'i gtso bor gyur pa ni 'di
dag stell 196
[2.7.1]
sbyangs pa'i mchog gyur kun mkhyen sherI 197 'od dang I
sras kyi mchog gyur blo bzang grags pa'i dpaII
mang thos mchog gyur blo bzang grags pa'i dpaII
'dul (l8b) 'dzin mchog gyur blo bzang grags pa'i dpaII
'phrin Ias
l198
mchog gyur blo bzang grags pa'i dpaI/l199
Ita ba'i1200 mchog gyur gon
l20l
gyo nyi rna grags/
1202
nyams len mchog gyur kun dga' dpal bzang pol
1178
1179
1180
1181
1182
!IS3
1184
1185
1186
1187
1188
tl89
1190
1191
1192
1193
1194
1195
1196
1197
1198
1199
1200
1201
1202
mkhyenpaem. : abbr. mkhyenasB : mkhyennasA; cf. p. 69, verse 7.
bskor A: skorB; cf. note 398, 1179,2093,2129.
zhes B : ces A.
bstan B : stan A.
rigs em. : rig A : rtogs B.
phun sum tshogs compl. : abbr. phun suM tshoDB : abbr. phunM tshog A.
dang B : <dang> A.
thugs Ije compl. : abbr. th+ye[tsa rtagsj A : abbr. th+ye B.
giB: <gi>A.
zhing B : cing A.
rtlilem. : brtlll AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. mortu12) rigpa'am dbangpogsal dang mi gsal
zhing B : cing A.
skal ba B : <skaJ ba> A.
du theg B : <du> theD A.
rgyas B : brgyas A.
paA :om.B.
yas B : <yas> A.
bZllngB: gZllngA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'dzinpa 1. (td.) bzung ba, gzung ba, zung.
steA: teB.
sherB : shes {--} A; cf. Mang thos (1993: 196): sher= abbr. shes rab.
'phrin las compl. : abbr. 'phris A : abbr. phds B.
Cf. NgCh 347.2: slob mayang, kun mkhyen sher 'od blo bzang gragspasogs, mangdu byung.
ba'iA: baB. cf. Mang thos: ba'i.
gonA :goB. '
gon gyonyi ma grags em. : gogyonyi magraDB : gon gyonyi mar grags A; cf. Mang thos (1993:
196): gon gyo nyi ma grags. For further spellings see endnote 283.
Text Edition
121
brtse
l203
1dan rnchog gyur dpal 'byor shes rab dangl
'chad mkhas rnchog
l204
gyur bsod narns shes rab dang I
rtsod bzang
l205
rnchog gyur dar rna rin chen te
l206
1
gzhung lugs rab 'byarns mkhyen pa'i bshes gnyen
l207
bdun/
[2.7.2]
bka' bcu pa
l208
chen po nam mkha' byang 'chad pa
l209
nil
de dag dang ngo mnyam
l2lO
du byed doll
gzhan yang bka' bcu pa
l2l1
rnang ra ba yon tan rgyal rntshan! bo dong bka' bcu pa
l2l2
grags
pa
l213
tshul khrirns
l214
1 byang pa bka' bcu pa
l215
dge
l216
legs dpal/ gnas myingl217 bka' bcu pa
mchog grub la sogs pa mamsl
[2.7.3]
mdo stod
l218
pa bka' bzhi 'dzin pa spre bo thang bzang
l219
I gnyal gro gor ba
l220
jo gdan
mtshungs rnedl la
l221
stod pa mkhan chen buddha srlj1222 sta ste ba chen po byang bsod! bo dong
pa chen po byang (S301) rgyall blo brtan!l223 bzang Idan pa don' grub rin chen!l224 ngam rings
1225
1203
1204
1205
1206
1207
1208
1209
i210
1211
1212
1213
1214
1215
1216
1217
1218
1219
1220
1221
1222
1223
1224
1225
brtse B : rtse A; cf. Nitartha, s.v. brtse idan -loving, affectionate. Cf. Mang thos: ltsom Idan. Conside-
ring here the next two, Mang thos emended according to the division into 'chad rtsod rtsom gSWD,
mchog B : mchoD A.
rtsod bzangem.: brtsod bzangA: ItsodmkhaB'; cf. Mang thos: rtsod bzang.
teB: steA.
mkhyen pa 'i bshes gnyen em. : abbr.: mkhyen pa 'i bshain B : shes pa 'i <b>shain A; cf. Tshig mdzod
chen mo, s.v. bshes gnyen 1) snying nye ba 'i dge rgan nam grogs po.
paB: <pa>A.
'chad pa em. : chad pa B : chad A; cf. Jaschke 1881: chadII. 1. to promise, 2. v. sub 'chad pa II. 1. to
explain, to teach.
ngo mnyam comp!. : abbr. ngo mnyaM A : ngos snyaMB; sm. to Goldstein 2001, s.v. ngo 'dra2.
something that looks like the original/real thing. Goldstein 2001, s.v. ngo 2. the real, the actual, the
essence (often conveys the true members ofa family as opposed to servants or distant relatives).
paB: baA.
mang ra ba yon tan rgyal mtshan, bo dong bka' bcu pa camp!. : mang ra ba y+ton rgyan[tsa rtags], bo
dong bka' bcu pa B : <mang ra ba y+ ton rgyan[tsa rtags], bo dong bka' bcu ba> A.
paB :pa'iA.
tshui khrims camp!. : abbr. tshndsMB : tshul khIim A.
paB: baA.
dge camp!. : <d>ge A : bde B.
mying B : snying A.
stodB : bstod A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. mdo stod
spre bo thang bzangA: spre'o tharbzangB.
baA: om.B.
Ia B : las A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. ia stod - ding ri rdzong gi sa cha zhig.
buddha shr1 em. : buddha shriB : budha shd A.
sta ste ba chen po byang bsod, bo dong pa chen po byang rgyal, bio brtan em. : sta ste ba chen po
byang bsod, chen po byang rgyal A : abbr. bo dong pa chenG byang rgyal, chenG byang bsod, bIo brtan
B.
don 'pub rin chen camp!. : abbr. don+mb rine B : abbr. don 'grub rinoe A.
ngam nngs comp!. : ngaM lings AB. cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. ngam ring - rdzong zhig bod rang
skyong Jjongs kyi nub rgyud dang mdog gzhung gtsang po 'i chu rgyud du yod yar klungs gtsang po
rdzong 'di'inubigyudnasshardu 'bab.
122 Chapter 5
pa dkon mchog dar/ mnga' ris pa yi dam dpalla sogs pa bka' bzhi 'dzin pa bcu phrag gcig
gsungs
1226
yang de las
1227
mang 'ba
l228
snang/ lung rigs
1229
smra ba'i seng ge
1230
sgra tshad pa
chos bzang
123l
/ jo gdan grags she
l232
/ sngo phyi dbon po la sogs pa
[2.7.4]
phar tshad mkhyen pa yang shin tu mangl
1233
rigs pa smra ba mams kyi nang na mchog tu gyur
pal ri phug pa mkhan chen
1234
bsod nams skyabsl dga' ldan gyi
1235
mkhan chen sakya
1236
srlla
sogs pa rigs pa smra ba'ang
1237
shin tu mang (58b) stod lung
1238
pa bso,d byang la sogs pa lung
chos smra ba yang mang du byon/ 'di dag ni bdag nyid chen po'i gsung rab kho na (l9a) las rtogs
pa 'khrungs
l239
pa yin no/ /
[2.7.5]
gzhan yang bdag nyid chen po'i gsung rab la gzigs shing / sdom phrug marns
1240
kyi nang nas
mchog
124l
tu gyur pal bo dong mkhan chen phyogs [B: tharns cad] las mam par
1242
rgyal ba chos
kyi rgyal mtshan pa dang
1243
/ brag
1244
ram mkhan chen chos rgyal/ ngam rings pa
1245
mkhan chen
rin chen dpal bzang
1246
[B: dang]/bzang ldan sde bdag slob dpon chen po nammkha' dpa1
1247
/
la stod
1248
nam mkha'i mal 'byor/ mkhyen ldan dharma
1249
mgon seng I stag tshang mkhan po
seng ge rgyal mtshan/ gsang phU
1250
gling stod mkhan chen 'od-chen pa
125l
/ gling smad mkhan
chen bsod nams
l252
'phell bka' bzhi 'dzin pa chen po nag
1253
rig/ slob dpon chen po gnyal
1254
pa
1226
1227
1228
1229
1230
1231
1232
1233
1234
1235
1236
1237
1238
123.
1240
1241
1242
1243
1244
1245
1246
1241
1248
1249
1250
1251
1252
1253
1254
gsungs compl. : gs+ya B : gsung A.
lasA: basB.
baem. :paA: barB.
dgsem.: dgAB.
seng ge compL: abbr. saing B : abbr. <saing> A.
bzang B : bzangs A.
grags she compl. : graD she B : grag she A.
yang shin tu mangem. : yang shin <tu> mang A: abbr. shinu mang B.
pa mkhan chen compl. : abbr. pa mkhen B : abbr. mkhen A.
gyiA:paB.
shAkya A : shakya B.
yang B: 'ang A.
lung B : lungs A.
'khrungs B: 'khrung A.
roamscompl. : abbr. roaMs A: abbr. roaMs nyaMs B.
mchog B : abbr. mchoD A.
mam parcompl. : maM <par>A : abbr. mamr B.
dang A : om. B.
bragem.: abbr. gragDA: gragB; cf. Las chen 2003: 617.15.
rings pa A : ring B.
bzang B : bzangs A.
slob dpon chen po nam mkha' dpal compl. : abbr. slaun cheno naMkha' dpal A : slaun chenG B.
la stod A : las ston B.
dharma em. : dharmA A : 'darpaB.
phuB: buA.
paA: om. B.
bsodnamscompl.: abbr. bsodMsB: bsodnaMA.
chenponagcompl.: abbr. chenonagB: abbr. chenogA.
gnyaFS : snyal A.
Text Edition
123
dang I rgyal dbang la sogs pa gsang phu'i slob dpon chen po phal che ba dang I dga' ba gdong
pa'i 1255 mkhan chen bya yu1 rin po che/
1256
10 mkhan pol byan.g rwa sgreng
1257
gi mkhan po (S302)
gnyis
1258
1 glang drag
1259
sher gsum
1260
gyi dbon chen! stag sna
1261
chos lung gi mkhan pol lha
bdun
1262
gyi bla rna la sogs nmga'ris phyogs kyi1263 sde snod 'dzin pa mams ni
1264
1 nyi zla ltar
grags pa'i mkhas pa
1265
P3I}.9i ta'i slob rigs yin!
[2.7.6]
sbas pa'i mal 'byor
l266
ku su lu'i slob rigs mams kyi nang nasi rnchog tu gyur pa sgra tshad la
. sogs thos pa'i yon tan dang ldan yang I ku su lu'i spyod pa skyong zhing I gzhan phan byang
chub kyi sems kyis thugs rgyud shin tu snum par byas pas/
1267
chos kyi rje jiiii. na ba dang I lung
rigs
1268
yon tan khur gyis Ici
1269
yang I ku su lu'j spyod pa kho na lhur len pa rnchog bzang legs
pa'i blo gros dang I rje btsun 'jam pa'i dbyangs kyi zhal rgyun du gzigs shing I ku su lu'i (l9b)
spyod pas
1270
nyin rntshan ' da' ba bla rna rmi lam pa
1271
brtson ' gruS1272 seng ge dang I dbus pa
bdag (59a) po'i bla rna chos rje rin bzang
1273
pa dang I tshe 'diblos btang zhing Sgrub
1274
pa
snying por rndzad pal ne ring pa Sgrub
1275
pa dpalla sogs pa gnyug rna'i 'khor bya bral ba roams
soil
1255
125"
1257
1258
1259
1260
1261
1262
1263
1264
1265
1266
1267
1268
1269
1270
1271
1272
1273
1274
1275
gdong pa'i A :sdong B.
riIJpo checompl.: abbr. rinoeAB.
TWa sgrengem. : IS sgrcng B : TWa grang A.
gnyiscompl.: 2A :go2B.
drag A : greg B.
GTN: 3 monasteries; cf. A': glang stag sher gsum.
dban chen stag sna em. : dben chen stag sga B : dbon chen rta sna A.
bdun A : mdun B.
phyogs kyi compl. : abbr. phyoD kyiB : kyi A.
niA: leB.
mkhas pa B : <mkhas pa> A.
mal 'byorcompl. : abbr. mor B : abbr. mor gang zag A.
pasA :paB.
rigs A : rig B.
yon tan khur gyis lei em. : abbr. y+ton <khur> gy+si fji A : abbr. y+ton+yi leiB.
pasB :paA.
nni lam pa compl. : nni laM pa B : abbr. nniM pa A. Sera transcipt reads: dbu ma pa.
brtson 'gras compl. : abbr. brts+rous A : abbr. rts+rous B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. brtson 'gras.
bzang B : bzang+s A.
sgrub B : <b>sgrub A.
sgrub B : bsgrub A.
124 Chapter 5
[2.7.7]
rdo rje 'dzin pa'i slob rigs kyi1276 mchog tu gyurpal sa skya grang mo che'i mkhan chen bzang
po rgyaI mtshan pa dang I chos rje lam 'bras pa blo bzang pa dang I rdo rje 'dzin pa chen po
chos dpaI bzang po dang I rdo rje ' dzin pa chen po bla rna bsod grags pa [dang] jI277 bla rna rgyaI
bzang pal sngags 'chang kun dga' zla ba la sogs pa
1278
rig pa 'dzin pa'i slob rna shin tu mang I
gzhan yang rab tu byung ba'i gdul bya mtha' yas S01279 II
[2.7.8]
rigs dang rus dang cho 'brang
l280
dang bsod nams kyi dpal gyis1281 mngon par mtho ba'i slob
rigs nil 'dzam bU
1282
gling gsum gnyis1283 kyi bdagpol rigs (8303) gsummgon po'i sprul pa chos
rgyal rnam
1284
gsum gyi dbon sras dam pal khri rgyal bsodnams ldeyab yum1285 sras dang bcas
pa dang
1286
1 dam pa 'ba' zhig byung byung ba'i rigsl sa skya 'khon gyi gdung rgyud/ bla rna
dbang gi sras pol slob dpon chen pol stobs kyi 'khor los sgyur ba'i rgyaI p01287 se chen gan gyi
gdung rgyud gong rna dge sbyong ba
1288
1 'byor ldan ne'u dpon nam
1289
1 dad ldan yon tan rgya
mtshol rigs ldan 'u yug ilia btsunl gnas rnying1290 stong dpon rgyal bzang I stobs
1291
idan rgya
chos stag gsum pa
1292
1 khungs
1293
btsun mnga' ris
1294
zhang blon 'khor dang bcas pa la sogs pa
gdul bya mtha' yas pa la rgyu mngon par mtho ba dang I 'bras bu (20a) nges par legs pa la sogs
pa thob pa'i thabs
1295
phyin ci rna log pa bstan no
1296
11
kun mkhyen sher ' od blo bzang grags pa sogsl
gzhung lugs rab 'byams
l297
shes pa'i bshes gnyen bdun/
1276
1277
1278
1279
1280
1281
1282
1283
1284
1285
1286
1287
1288
1289
1290
1291
1292
1293
1294
1295
1296
1297
slob rigs kyi campI. : abbr. slob riD kyiB : <slob rigs> A.
grags pa dang em. : abbr. graD pa B : grag pa {--} A.
1asogspacompl.: abbr.1aswopaA: <la>soDB.
mtha' yas so compl. : abbr. mtha' yaso B : abbr. mthaso A.
'brang B : (--J 'phrang A.
kyi dpa1 gyis compl. : abbr. kyi dpaJ+yis B : gyi <dpa1> gyis A.
bu A: bu'iB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'dzam bu gling-jambudvIpa.
gsumgnyisem.: abbr. suM2AB; GTN: two third.
mamem.: abbr. maMS: abbr. maMspaA; cf. Tshigmdzodchenmo, s.v. spro1pa.
yab yum compl. : abbr. yab yuMB : abbr. yuM<b> A.
dang B : om. A.
'khor los sgyur ba 'i rgyal po compl. : abbr. 'khaurs sgyur ba 'i rgyal po B: 'khor 10 bsgyur ba 'i rgyal
posA.
baB :paA.
'byor 1dan ne'u dpon nam compl. : 'byor /dan ne'u dponaM A : stobs 1dan sne'u dpon pa B.
myingB: snyingA; cf. note 1217.
stobsA: 'byorB.
gsumpacompl.: gsuMpaA: 3B.
khungs B : khung A.
risB: rigA.
thabs B : thab A.
pa bstan no A : pa bstan to B.
rab 'byamsB : 1eg+s parA. Tshig mdzod chen rno, s.v. rab 'byams 1) mtha' med dang shin tumang
bar .. gzhung lugs rab 'byams. Cf. section 2.7.1, line 11. Note that Ye shes rgyal mtshan 902.9 agrees
withms.B.
Text Edition 125
bka' bzhi legs par smra ba beu phrag geig12981
phar tshad shes pa'i slob
1299
ma brgya phrag rgal
l300
I zhes gsungs soil
[2.7.9]
[2.7.9.1J
(59b) de ltar dngos kyi gdul bya mams rjes su bzung nasi ma 'ongs pa'i gdul bya mams rjes su
bzung bar bya ba'i
1301
phyirl gong du bstan
l302
pa'i legs par
l303
bshad pa
l304
[B: rin po ehe'i]
'phreng ba de mams mdzad dolP05
[2.7.9.2J
'dzam gling mkhas pa'i rgyan mehog bka' chen bzhil
rtsa 'jug bzhi gsum theg chen rgyud bla
1306
dang I
chos nmgon mdzod dang dpalldan ' dus pa sogsl
mam bshad byas pa'i gzhung lugs bcu phrag gcig/
l307
[2.7.9.3J
ces gsungs kyang
1308
derma 'dus palung kun las btus pa'i pkal3091 [B: bshes pa'i springs
1310
yig
tIka131l1] gsang 'dus kyi dkyil chogl bdag 'jugl (S304) mchod phreng I mdo rgyud bstan bcos
thams cad kyi snying po gcig tu bsdus pa go bde 'jug par
13l2
sla ba'i man ngag rin po che bka'
'bum thor bu ba la sogs pal rjes 'jug gi gdul bya mams kyi ston pa yi ge'i ngos na bzhugs pa
dpe13l3 lnga beu rtsa lnga mdzad doll
mdo lasl
lnga brgya
l314
tha mar gyur pa'i tshe
13l5
1
nga ni yi ge'i ngos la gnasl zhes gsungs [B: sol]I
1298
1299
1300
1301
1302
1303
1304
1305
1306
1307
1308
1309
1310
1311
1312
1313
1314
1315
bcu phrag gcig= 10
slob B : slo A.
brgya brag rgal - more than 100.
bzung bar bya ba 'i A : bzung ba 'iB.
gong du bstan B : gongs du bshad A.
legsparcompl.: legs <par>A: abbr. leDrB.
paB :pa'iA.
mdzad do B : abbr. mdzade A.
blaB: bla (ma} A.
Cf. NgCh 347.1-2: mom pa yang, 'dzam gling mdzes pa 'i rgyan mchog dka' chen bzhi sogs mang du
mdzad Ye shes rgya1 mtshan 901.25-27 contains the whole verse.
kyang A : yang B.
TIkA em. : Ti ka AB.
springs em. : springB; cf. TBRC code W453. Note that Las chen agrees withms. B mentioning bshes
spring, 1) 157a5, 2) 31Oa6, 3) 614.12.
TIkAem.: TikaB.
'jugparcompl.: abbr. 'jugrB: 'jugsparA.
dpe em. : dpe'A : deb B.
brgya B : <b>rgya A.
tshe B : tshes A.
126 Chapter 5
[B: blo] bstod par/1316
mkhas pa dgyes pa'i
1317
lam du khridl1318
mang thos chud mi za ba'i
1319
rgyu!
de don bsgrub Ia'ang
1320
rab tu sbyorl
de1321 phyir khyod kyis1322 gdul bya Ial
bgyi bar ' os pa ma Ius mdzadl
phan mdzad khyod Ia dus kun dU13231
bdag ni gus pas phyag 'tshalloll zhes S0
1324
11
[2.8 Verse 8]
[8] bdag med gnas (20b) lugs rtogs pa'i shes rab kyis
1325
1
kun rdzob rten 'breI sgyu ma Ita bur gzigsl
don dam chos libyings nam mkha' Ita bur rtogsl
Ita ba mam dag
l326
khyod Ia phyag 'tshalIoll
zhes
l327
pa nil 'khor 'das kyi chos thams cad stong zhing bdag med par rtogs pa'i shes rab zab
mosl ma brtags1328 nyams dga' ba'i mam ' gyur kun rdzob rten cing 'breI bar1329 'byung ba thams
cad sgyu ma dang rmi lam Ita bur rna ' dres par so sar gzigs shing I don dam [B: pa'i] bden pa
chos kyi dbyings nam mkha'i dkyilItar brjod du med pa'i don! so sor rang gis
1330
rig pa'i ye
shes bmyes pa'i Ita (60a) bamampar dagpa dang Idanpa yin te/kho bo Iadbu ma'i rtogs1331 pa
Skyes1332 tshul rim pa
l333
bzhi byung stel ' di Itar dang p01334 chad stong I gnyis pa snang stong I
gsumparten 'breI sgyumar go1335 ba/bzhi parten 'breI btags
l336
yod gzhi1337 med du go ba'oll
1316
1317
1318
1319
1320
1321
1322
1323
1324
1325
1326
1327
1328
1329
1330
1331
1332
1333
1334
1335
1336
1337
Source: dPalldan bla ma dam pa ku mii ra ma ti'i yon tan Ijes su dran nas eung zad bstod pa, in Tsong
khapa'i bka' 'bum thorbu, gSung 'bum, vol. kha, p. 7al-2. Cf. Toh. 5274 (4) A euJogytoKumiirama-
Ii, the ehiefteaeher ofTsongkhapa.
dgyespa'iA: dgel''iB; cf. Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.v. dgespa -dgyespa dang'c!ra.
khridB : 'kbrid A. In ms. A the prefix 'a ehungis marked with three dots on top, which means that it
needs to be deleted.
za ba'iB : abbr. za 'i A.
bsgrub la 'angem. : bsgrubs la 'ang {-} A : sgrub la 'ang B; cf. sgrub pa note 727.
deA: de'iB.
kyis A : kyiB.
duA: tuB.
zhessocompl.: abbr. zhesoB: abbr. eesoA.
kyisem. : kyi AB; cf. p. 69, verse 8.
mam dagcompl.: abbr. maMgB: maM{-} A.
zhel' B ,: eel' A.
brtags em. : rtaD B : rtag A.
'brei barcompl.: abbr. 'brelrB: 'brelparA.
gisA :giB.
rtogsem.: rtogAB.
skyel'A: skyeB.
dmpaA: om. B.
dang po A : abbr. dong B.
goA: b{-}oB. '
btags compl. : btaDB : reg A.
gzhiB : bzhi A. .
Text Edition
127
de la dang po ni (S305) bum pa tho bas beorn pa ltarl kun rdzob rdzas yod rigs pas bshig pa'i
stong pa nyid del 'dis kyang rigs pas dpyad
l338
kyi bden 'dzin bzlog eing I stong nyid la rnos
pa'i
1339
rgyu tsam byed do
134
11
gnyis pa nil snang ba sgyu rna lta bur snang dus nyid nasi rang bzhin
l341
rned par rtogs pa stel
, dis phyi gzung
1342
ba la sgro bskur gyi rtog pa rntha' dag bzlog
1343
kyang I nang rnyong1344 rig
la brod pa'i zhen pa mi ' dor basi sems tsarn marn rdzun pa'i 1345 lta ba las rna ' dasl
sum pa nil nang rnyong1346 rig dang phyi gzung
1347
ba gnyis ka
1348
yang rgyu rkyen la rag las
l349
pasl sgyu rna ltar kun rdzob tu
l350
yang snang ba tsarn las rang bzhin eung zad kyang rned par
rtogs pa te
1351
I ' di la yang rnthar
1352
, dzin gyi zhen pa ci yang rned kyang I rten 'breI sgra rtog la
rna
1353
ltos pa'i don ehos sgyu rna tsarn du (21a) 'dzin pa yod pasl mal 'byor spyod pa'i
1354
dbu
rna pa1355 las rna 'dasl
bzhi pa nil rten 'breI gyi ehos marns rigs pas tshul bzhin du dpyad1356 pa na! rang gi ngo bo cung
zad kyang mi myed eing I rna dpyad pa na! tha snyad kyi yul du gyur pas
l357
1 rtog
1358
pas
btags
1359
shing I ming gi tha snyad
1360
du byas pa tsarn gyis btags
l361
yod du rtogs pa'oll
1338
1339
1340
1341
1342
1343
1344
1345
1346
1347
1348
1349
1350
135}
1352
135]
1354
1355
1356
1357
1358
1359
1360
1361
rigs pas dpyad em. : abbr. nD chadB : rig dpyad A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. dpyod pa 1. (td.)
dpyadpa, dpyadpa, dpyod - phra zhib tu rtogpa'am bIos gzab nan gyis Jal ba. Illuminator, s.y. rigs
pas dpyod pa.
mas pa'icompl. : abbr. mos'iB : mas pa'imos pa'i A. In ms. A the first ligature mas pa'iis marked
with dots on top, i.e. it is to be deleted (cf. note 1318).
doA : am. B.
rang bzhin campI. : abbr. rang 4n B : abbr. rangni A.
phyi gzungem. : phyis gzung A : phyi bzung B.
bzlog A : zlog B.
myongB: myongsA; cf. Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.y. myongba.
rdZlln pa 'i em. : abbr. rdzun'iB : brdzun pa 'i A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. sems tsam mam rdZlln
pa - sems tsam pa 'i grub mtha'i nang gses shig ste, dbang shes la rags par snang ba snang ba ltar du
grub par mi 'dod pa.
myong B : myongs A.
gzungA: bZllngB.
ka em. : ga AB.
lasB: lusA.
tuB: duA.
pa steA : pas teB.
mthar A: mtha'B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. mthar 'dzinpa'ilta ba - bdag gam phung polnga
la rtag pa dang chad par 'dzin pa 'di dbu ma 'i lam gyis nges par 'byung ba la bar du gcod pa'i las can
no.
maA : am. B.
spyodpa'icompl. : abbr. spyod'iB : <spyod> pa'i A (at the bottom ofp. 60a, marked with a cross).
paA: am. B.
dpyadB : bead A.
pasB :paA.
rtogA: rtoDB.
btags campI. : abbr. btaD B : brtag A.
tha snyadB : tha myed A.
btags campI. : abbr. btaD B : brtag A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. tha snyad btags pa - ming du
btagspa,
128 Chapter 5
de lta bu'i rang bzhin gyis1362 rten 'breI rtogs pa'i blo de nyid kyisl blo gzhan la ltos rned du
rgyu 'bras phan tshun mi 'khrul ba dang I rten 'breI rtag chad spros pa'i
1363
rntha' thams cad
dang bral ba gcig 'ong
1364
ba yin gsungs
l365
1
lta ba 1366 'di gzhan gyi thugs yul du rna chud par chad lta yin [B: zhes] zer ba rnang na yang I
khas len thams cad dang bral ba'i lta ba 'di klu sgrub yab sras kyi dgongs pa (60b) phyin ci (S306)
rna log pa yin tel 'phags pa klu sgrub kyi zhal snga
l367
nasi
gal te ngas dam bcas 'ga' yodl
des na nga la skyon 'ga,1368 yodl
nga la dam bca' rned pas na!
nga ni skyon rned kho na'oll
zhes gsungs1369 shing1370 I 'ga' zhig
1371
rang rgyud kyi dam bca' rnedl rang lugs kyi dam bca'l372
yod ces zer yang I rning spos pa tsam rna gtogsl373 don la khyad parl374 'ga' yang rned gsungl
mkhas pa gzhan dag gi 1375 Ita ba bzang
1376
bzang par 'dod pa marns kyang I bdag 'dzin la gros
dris nasi bzhag pa
l377
kho nar zadl nga'i Ita ba 'di yang I nga rang [B: dang] sdongs nas 'gro ba
gcig 'ong bar
1378
'dug gsung ste
1379
1 shin tu mad [B: do/]1
[2.8.1]
chos rje blo bzang pas 'jam dbyangs kyi zhal gzigs nasi dbu ma'i lta ba'i1380 dgongs tshul zhus
pasl da dung
l381
ma go (2Ib) gsung I '0 na khyed
l382
dpon slob la khyad med
l383
pasl slob dpon
1362
1363
1364
1365
1366
1367
1368
1369
1370
1371
1372
1373
1374
1375
1376
1377
1378
1379
1380
1381
1382
1383
gyis em. : gyi AB.
sprospa'iA: abbr. sprodpa'iB.
'ong B: 'ongs A.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
baB :paA.
snga B : <snga> A.
ga 'B: 'diA; check the resp. verse
zhes gsungs compl. : abbr. zhesungs B : zhes gsung A.
shing B : kyallg A.
ga' zhigcompl. : abbr. giDA: abbr. gigB.
bca 'B : bcas A.
gtogscompl.: abbr. gtoDB: gtogA.
khyad parcompl. : abbr. khyadr B : khyad <par> A.
gzhan dag gi A : abbr. gzhan+yiB.
bzang B : <bzang> A.
paB : parA.
'ong barB: yongspa<r>A; cf. note 955.
'dug gsung ste B: 'dug te A.
ba'iA: baB.
dung A : rung B; cf. Jaschke 1881: da, da dung (frq. pronounced and spelled: da rung) - still (more).
khyed compl. : {-yed} <khyed> A : nged B. In ms. A not well readable; marked with cross and
repeated below line 7: khyed
khyad medB : abbr. khyed A.
Text Edition
129
pas kyang rna dgongs [B: sam] zhus pas/khong gis
1384
go yodl zhib cha
l385
'ga' yar
1386
ni rna go
gsung
1387
1 de Itar grags kyang I chos rje pa'i gdul bya pho ms
1388
che zhing I mkhyen rab
1389
chung ba
1390
'ga' zhig yab sras gnyis chos rje pa'i Ita ba mchog yin tel 'jam dbyangs kyi zhaI
gzigs pa'i phyir [B: zhes] zer ba ni mi rigs tel 'jam dbyangs dang mi dang mi bzhin [B: du]
'grogS1391 shing I sangs rgyas kyi bstan pa la yang chos rje bas
1392
ches cher lhag pa'i bya ba
1393
mdzad pa pa!}. chen zhi ba mtshos
1394
kyang I thai ' gyur gyi Ita ba thugs su ma1395 child par rgya
bod kun tu grags 13P6 shing I don Ia yang
1397
gnas tel rang rgyud pa'i shing
1398
rta chen po yin pa'i
phyirroll
'phags pa dang dngos su mjaI1399 bas Ita ba bzang Ial rna mjaI
1400
bas Ita ba ngan pa'i nges pa
med (8307) del slob dpon chen po legs 1dan 'byed dang I dpaIldan zla ba grags pa bzhin noll
drung pa Ia chad Ita ba
1401
yin zer mkhan gda,1402lags zhus pasl yod nyen yodl sngon ston pa
1403
'jig rten du byon pa'i dus su! dge sbyong
1404
gautama
1405
ni chad par smra ba'oll
(6Ja) zer
1406
mkhan [B: mang du] byung , dugl de'i rjes su kIu sgrub yab sras dpalldan zia bal khu
byug che chung la'ang
l407
de bzhin zer.mkhan byung 'dugl bod du yang dbu rna pa chen po
gangs pa she'u
l408
kllU mdo sdel 'bar pa
1409
tshab nyi rna gragsl Ice sgom zhig po sogs la'ang
chad Ita bar grags 'dugl 'u yang chad Ita [B: ba] yin yang grogs bzang bar yod kyi gsungs
1410
1
1384
1385
1386
1387
1388
1389
1390
1391
1392
1393
1394
1395
1396
1397
1398
1399
14<)0
1401
1402
1403
1404
1405
1406
1407
1408
1409
1410
gisB: giA.
chaA: bca'B.
Perh. 'ga' yar is a different spelling of kha yar; c Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. kha yar 3) kha shas
dang, 'ga' shas.
ni ma go gsung A : 1a <111> ma go gsung B.
Cf.p.111.
rob B : rabs A.
baB :paA.
'groDB: 'grogA.
basB :pasA.
baB: <ba>A.
mtshos B : mtsho A.
su ma compl. : su <ma> A : du ma B.
gmgscompl.: gmDB: gmgA.
1ayangA: 1a'angB.
shing B : shin A.
mjal B : 'ia1 A; cf. Jiischke 1881: mjal ba, imp. mjoi, 1. to meet c. dang, = 'phrad pa, without any
respect to rank. More frq. 2. resp.: to obtain access to an honoured person; zhal dngos su mjal bar yod
- he (the reincarnated Buddha) may personally be seen and spoken to.
mjalB: 'ja1 A.
baA: om.B.
gda'em. : brda' A: bdogB; c Jaschke 1881: lags, gda' 1ags- there is; Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v.
bdog pa 1. (tmd.) 'dug pa 'am yod pa.
paA: pa {-} B.
dge sbyong A : abbr. dgeong B.
gautama em. : go 'u fa ma AB; c liluminator, s.v. go 'utama - corrupted foun of gautama.
zer B : zhes zer A.
1a 'ang A : 1a yang B.
she'uB: shi'uA.
paB: spaA.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
130 Chapter 5
karma ba
1411
dkon gzhon gyis kyang ! khyed chad Ita (22a) ba
1412
yin byas pas! nga chad Ita ba e
yin! nga'i spyod pa 'di la Itos gsungs
l413
pas! khyed shin tu mad par gda'o
1414
11
bzod par gsol zhes
1415
zhus par
1416
grags
l417
1
phyogs bcur bzhugs pa'i rgyal ba sras bcas mamsl
mngon sum
1418
byon nas dbyangs dang mgrin gcig gisl
'di las gzhan du thar pa'i lam ston yang I
bdag blo g.yo ba med do grogs po dagl ces gsungs/
1419
de ltar phyir mi ldog pa'i rtogs
1420
pa brtan po thob pa yin noll
[2.9 Verse 9]
[9] bshes gnyen dul ba zhi ba
1421
nyer zhi bal
sdom pa kun
1422
ldan nyes ltung dri rna bral!
sgo gsum rna beos !hug pa'i ngang la
1423
bzhugs
1424
1
spyod pa mam dag khyod la phyag 'tshallol I
zhes
1425
pa nil theg
1426
pa chen po'i dge ba'i bshes gnyen 'di nil !hag pa'i tshul khrims kyi1427
bslab
1428
pa dang ldan pasl thugs rgyud shin tu dul ba
1429
lal !hag pa
1430
shes rab kyi bslab
1431
pa
dang ldan (8308) pas rab tu zhi zhing I !hag pa sems kyi bslab
1432
pa dang ldan pas nye bar zhi ba
yinno!1
14J1
1412
1413
1414
1415
1416
1417
1418
1419
1420
1421
1422
1423
1424
1425
1426
1427
1428
1429
1430
1431
1432
kanna baA: skarmaB; c note 616.
Ita ba compl. : lta{n) ba A: Ita (-) B. Note that in ms. A the suffix n is marked by dots (cf. notes
1318, 1339).
gsungs A : abbr. gs+ya B.
gda '0 A : bda '0 B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gda' - 'dug gam yod pa.
zhes B : ces A.
zhus par A : abbr. zhusr B.
grags compl. : abbr. graD B : grag A.
mngon sum compl. : abbr. mngon sl1MB : abbr. mngounM A.
Cf. Red mda' ba (1993: 359.10-13). See also note 639.
rtogs em. : rtog AB.
dul bazhi baA: zhi ba dul baB; cf. p. 70, verse 9; see also note 51.
kun em. : abbr. gsuM A: abbr. JB; cf. p. 70, verse 9.
la B : du A; cf. p. 70, verse 9.
bzhugscompl.: bzhuDB: bzhugA.
zhes B : ces A.
theg B : thegs A.
kyiB :gyiA.
bslab A : slab B.
baA :om.B.
pa B : pa 'j A; c Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. lhag pa shes rab kyi bslab pa - theg pa chen po ni chos
dang gang zag gnyis kyi bcL1g med rtogs pa dang, nyan thos dag ni gang zag gi bdag med par rtogs pa 'i
shes rab. '
kyi bslab A : gyi slab B.
bslab A : slab B.
Text Edition
131
[2.9.1]
so sortharpa bsnyen
l433
gnas kyi sdompayanlag brgyad/ dge gnyen gyi yanlag lngaJ dge tshul
gyi yan lag beul dge slong gi
l434
khrims
l435
nyis
l436
brgya lnga beu rtsa gsum la nyes ltung gi
l437
dri ma'i skyon gyis rna gos pa yin tel
[2.9.1.1J
[M:
1438
namo gurave
l439
]
(1) (M 9a5) gang zhig legs gsung dam ehos
1440
, dul ba laJ
rab tu byung nas legs par mi sdom zhing !
thub pa'i bka' lung tshul min 'da,1441 byed pa'i!
dge sbyong de dag 'jig rten ehom rkun yin!
(2) 'khyogl442 por smra la (61b) gzhan dag brling
l443
por sems!
ngag mi btsun pa dge sbyong tshul min pas!
gya gyu'i sems dang de yi
1444
(22b) tshul spangs te
1445
!
gsong por
l446
smra la kho bOS
1447
rtag tu brten
l448
!
(3) 'dzem
l449
med smra la
l450
gzhan dag SpObS
l451
par
l452
sems!
ngag mi 1453 sdom pa dge sbyong tshul min pas!
1433
1434
1435
1436
1437
1438
1439
1440
1441
1442
1443
1444
1445
1446
1447
1448
1449
1450
1451
1452
1453
bsnyen B : gnyen A.
giB :gisA.
khzims comp!. : abbr. khriMs B : khzim A.
nyis B : nyi A.
gi A : om. B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. nyes ltung - sdom pa nyams pa 'j nyes pa.
Source of the following verses: Minor Works, text no. 8) dOe sbyong gi tshu/ /a gdams pa, 0029-0030:
pp. 9a4-9b6, CPN, no. 006117 (13? pp. 6), mdzad pa po Sakya'i dge slong gZhon nu blo gros. The
verses are the beginning of the rang [gil mam [thar] (autobiography) of gZhon nu blo gros on which
mNga' ris pa Sangs rgyas rtse mo has partly based this present biography on Red mda' ba. For further
details on Red mda' ba's autobiography see Textual Materials, section on Ms. M and Appendix p. 303.
These eight verses also agree with Ye shes rgyal mtshan 894.27-895.14 and Zha/ gdams53.1-54.3.
nama guraveem. : M: namagu ra bhai'. Ace. to declination of gumm. (like pasum.) dative singular
gurave, dual gurubhyiim and plural gumbhyafi. Here the dative singular is most likely.
ehos BM : <ehos> A.
'da'MR: z/oA: z/ogB.
'khyog AMR : khyog B.
briingR: riingABM; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. briingpo 1) brtanpo dang, 'gyurbamedpa.
deyiR: de'iABM.
spangs teMB: spang steA; see note 1462.
gsong par AMR : gsang po B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gsong po - drang po dang bden pa, ... skad
eha gsong par smra ba po.
kho bas R : abbr. khau ABM.
brten BM : bsten AR; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. rten pa (tmd.) brten pa, brten pa, rten 1) /tos pa.
'dzem BMR : abbr. 'dzeM {-j A.
laMR: baAB.
spobs BMR : spob A.
par AMR : barB.
miBMR: {gi} <mi>A.
132 Chapter 5
mu cor smra ba smyon pa'i
1454
tshu1 spangs te
1455
f
zhi ba'i tshullakho bOS
1456
(M9b) rtag tu brten
1457
f
(4) phyi tshul 'ehos pa
1458
gzhan dag btsun por semsf
g.yo sgyu'i
l459
spyod pa dge sbyong1460 tshul min pasf
pha ro1 ' drid
1461
byed yon pa'i tshul spangs te
l462
f
des pa'i tshulla kho bOS
1463
rtag tu brten
1464
f
(5) rang dga'i spyod pa gzhan dag drang por semsf
dbang po mi sdom dge sbyong1465 tshul min pasf
bag dang mi !dan hral po'i tshul spangs tef
bag yod tshu11a kho bOS
1466
rtag tu brten
1467
f
(6) bya byed mang ba
1468
gzhan dag grung1469 por semsf
mam g.yeng 'dod pa dge sbyong tshu1 min pasf
'du 'dzi srel
1470
ba khyim pa'i tshul spangs tef1471
don nyungl472 tshu1la kho bOS
1473
rtag tu brten
1474
f
(7) longs spyod 'byor ba
1475
gzhan dag dpal du semsl
'dod zhen ehe ba dge sbyong tshul min pasf
(S309) zang zing dang beas grong pa'i tshul spangs tef
ehog shes tshulla kho bOS
1476
rtag tu brten
1477
f
1454
1455
1456
1457
1458
1459
1460
1461
1462
1463
1464
1465
1466
1467
1468
1469
1470
1471
1472
1473
1474
1475
1476
1477
smyonpa'iAR: abbr. smyon'iB : broyonpa'iM.
spangs te BMR : spang te A; c note 1445.
kho bosR: abbr. kauABM.
brten AM : bsten BR.
'chospaBM : <'>chospaA : 'choslaR.
sgyu'iBMR : rgyu'i A; c Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. g.yo sgyu - rang skyon sba zhing gzhan mgo
skor ba 'i bsam sbyor zhig.
sbyong BMR : sbyongs A.
pha raf 'dIidM : abbr. phol 'brid AB : bddR; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'dIid pa (td.) bdd pa,
bdd pa, bdd - slu ba.
spangs te BMR : abbr. spangste A; cf. note 1445.
kho bos R : kho bo M : abbr. khau AB.
brten AM : rten B : bsten MR.
sbyong BMR : sbyongs A.
kho bos R : kho bo M : abbr. khau AB.
brten ABM : bsten R.
baBMR:paA.
grung AR : drung BM; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. grung po 2) nus pa dang ldan pa.
'dzi srel M: 'dzi bsrefR: 'dzis brefB : 'dzis bre<l> A.
spangs teBMR: spangssteA; cf. note 1445.
nyung AMR : myur B (in ms. B syllable marked with three points on top).
kho bosR: kho boAM: abbr. khauB.
brten ABM : bsten R.
baR:paABM. '
kho bos R : abbr. khau ABM.
brten AB : bsten MR.
Text Edition 133
(8) grong 'dabs
1478
'grim pa gzhan dag gdul byar semsl
rnyed bkur
1479
Sgrub
1480
pa dge sbyong1481 tshul min pasl
khe spogs1482 'dod pa tshong
1483
pa'i tshul spangs tel
bas rntha'i gnas la kho bOS
1484
rtag tu brten
1485
1 zhes gsungs so
1486
11
de ltar gzhan gnod gzhi
1487
bcas spong ba so sor thar pa'i tshul khrirns mam par dag pa yin noll
[2.9.2]
gzhan phan mtha' dag Sgrub
1488
(23a) pa byang chub sems dpa'i tshul khrims
1489
kyang mam par
dag pa yin tel myed dang bkur sti
1490
chags pa yisl bdag bstod gzhan la smod pa dang zhes (62a)
pa'i nyes pas ma gas tel
[2.9.2. I}
(1) gang du gnas na snang shas 'phe! 'gyur zhing I
rang rgyud myed bkur zhags
1491
pas 'ching byed la
1492
I
gzhan rgyud phrag dog
1493
'gran
1494
sems kyis gdungs pa'i
1495
1
gnas der
1496
skad cig tsam yang rni gnas soil
(2) gzhan gyi
1497
nyes pa nam yang rni gleng zhing I
don dang ldan zhing chos mthun ma gtogs1498 pal
1478
1479
1480
148[
1482
1483
1484
1485
1486
1487
1488
1489
1490
1491
1492
1493
1494
1495
1496
1497
1498
'dabs B : 'dab M : zlab A : dag R; cf. Tshig mdzod chen 'mo, s.v. 'dabs - ngogs sam 'khris, ... ri'i
'dabs, ... grong khyer gyi nye 'dabs.
bkurMR: <bkur>A: bskurB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v.111yed bkw:
sgI1lb BR : bsgrub AM; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. bsgrub pa - sgI1lb pa 'i ma 'ongs pa.
sbyongBMR: sbyongsA.
khe spogs M : kbe bogs A : khye spoD B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. khe spogs - khe bzang dang
skyed ka, ... kbe spogs sgI1lb pa, ... khe spogs 'don pa. SeD, S.v. kbe kbye, kbe spogs- gain, profit.
tshong BMR : tshongs A.
kho bos R : kbo bo M : abbr. khau AB.
brte11 ABM : bsten R.
zhes gsungs so campI. : abbr. zhesungso B : abbr. ces gsungso A.
gzhiB : bzhi A.
sgrub B : bsgI1lb A.
tshul kbrimscompl. : abbr. tshruisMB : abbr. tshul khrim A.
sti A : bstiB; cf. note 286.
111yed bkur zhags R : 111yed bkur zhaD B : b111yed bkur zhag A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. zhags
pa - 'gugs byed kyi thag pa 'am, 'ching byed
laBR: {-)A.
phrag dog R : abbr. phrog A : phra dog B.
'gran em. : 'dranAB.
kyis gdungs pa'iB : gyis gdungs pa'i A: kyis gdung ba'iR; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gdung ba
(tmd.) gdungs pa, gdung ba.
der BR : de<r> A.
gzhan gyi campI. : gzhan+yiB : gzhan gyis A.
gtogs campI. : gtog+s A : rtogs B.
134 Chapter 5
dmag dang ehom rkun rgyal po'i gtam la sogsl
'khrul ba'i 1499 bka' mehid nam yang mi bgyid
lSOO
doll
zhes gsungs;ISO
1
sdug bsngal mgon med gyur pa la/
ser snas chos nor
1S02
mi ster
lSOJ
dang I
zhes pa'i
1S04
nyes pas rna gos telSOSI chos don du gnyerba'i gdul byamgonmed [B: pa]mams la
[B: slob dpon gyi] dpe mkhyud
1S06
spangs tel mdo rgyud bstan beos kyi dgongs pa rangmam
1S07
tshim gyi
1S08
bar du ston pa'i phyir roll
gdul bya rdzas don du gnyer ba mgon med pa mams la yang I rdzas la ser sna spangs tel dbul
phongs1S09 kyi Ie ba bskangs parl5l0 mdzad doll
[2.9.2.2J
[B: de ltaryang] bdag (S310) nyid chen po 'di mangyul skyid
1S11
grongna bzhugs pa'i
1S12
dus sui
zhabs tog pa med pa la/ mdze ph0
1513
pha spad gnyis yong
1S14
nasi bsod snyoms drags
1S1S
pa gcig
gnang bar
1S16
zhu zhus pasl nang du gshegs nasi tsam rkya1
1s17
gog p01S18 geig gnang bas
1s19
1 sha
1499
1500
1501
1502
1503
1504
1505
1506
1507
1503
1509
1510
1511
1512
1513
1514
1515
1516
1517
1518
1519
'khrul ba 'iR : abbr. 'khru1'iB: 'khrul pa 'i A.
bgyid AR : gyidB.
zhes gsungs comp!. : abbr. zheslmgs B : ces gsungs A. These two verses are verses 3 and 7 among nine
verses given in Zhal gdams 54.13-55.15. They have not been identified in ms. M so far. However in
Zhal gdams these verses are given under the headline "Extract of Some Instructions taken from the
Minor Works of Red mda' ba." See also Ye shes rgyal mtshan 895.15-896.5.
chos norB : mchod gtor A; cf. thun drug: 2nd of the 18 bodhisattva precepts: chos nor mi ster zhing.
sterB : gter A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. ster ba (td.) 1) sbyinpa.
zhespa'icompl.: abbr. zhes'iB: cespa'iA.
teB: steA.
dpemkhyudB: dpe'mkhyudA.
mamem. :naMAB.
gyiA: om.B.
phongsem.: 'phongsAB.
bskangs par em. : bskong bar A : skong bar B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. skong ba (td.) 1. bskangs
pa, bskang ba, skongs I) yid tshim par byed pa, ... re ba bskangs.
skyidB : gyiA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. skyid grongja ba - 'phags pa mched bzhi'i nang gses
skyid rang spyan ras gzigs Iha khang du bzhugs pa 'i 'phags pa wa ti.
bzhugspa'iA: abbr. bzhuD'iB.
mdzephoem.: 'dzephoA: 'dzepaB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. mdzepha.
pha spad gnyis yongem. : abbr. pha phad 2 yang A: phad pad 1 'ongs B; cf. SeD, s.v. pha, pha spad
= pha dang bu - father and son or father and daughter.
dragscomp!. : draD{-} A: dragB; cf. Jiischke 1881: drags-adv. very, much, greatly.
barB : parA.
rkyalB : skyal A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. rkyal pa - tshem bu brgyab pa'i pags pa'i sgro ba
dang, brang khag sogs nas ma gshags par hril por bshus pa 'i rlid bu.
gagpoem.: dkogpo baB: abbr. kageA; cf. Jiischke 1881: gogpa-dilapidated, ruinous,khang(-pa)
gog (-po)- a house in ruins; ... of clothes: out of repair, ragged.
basB :pasA.
Text Edition
135
gcig kyang thugs la 'dOgS
I520
zerba laJ [B: ba] sha lag pa gcig gnang / sku byug gil521 chas [B:
ka] mar gcig kyang gnang ba
l522
zhu zer nas 'tshal
l523
bas mar gong phyed bshags
l524
(23b) gcig
myed pa'ang gnang! ras 1cags
1525
'ga' yar yang gnang zhes ~ a g s l
[2.9.2.3]
dga' ba gdong
l526
du 'khams
1527
pa gcig gis ja la gdan drangsl bsngo rten/ [B: gos chenl gang
l528
dkar po gcig phul/ tshur byon pa'i lam du sprang po gcig gis gnang sbyin zhus pas phyag phyir
btsun chung gcig yod pa la gos yug de (62b) sbyinl529 gsung nas gnang I
[2.9.2.4]
yang lha sar gshegs pa'i lam du/ sprang po gnyis ladngul gyirdorjere re gnang Ilha sar sprang
po mang po 'dus nasi gnang sbyinl530 zhus pasl nye 'khor na yod pa'i grogs thams cad bas
shig
l531
gsungs pasl khong
l532
pas lha sa sde bzhi'i 1533 sprang po thams cad bsduS
l534
nasi sprang
rdzus dang bcas pas
l535
lnga brgya tsam byung ba
l536
laJ dar kha dang gos kha 'dres pa
l537
spungs
l538
nas sprang po 'phrang la bshar nas
l539
1 snga gang zin re gnang bas
l540
sprang po
1520
1521
1522
1523
1524
1525
1526
1521
1528
1529
'1530
1531
1532
1533
1534
1535
1536
1537
1538
1539
1540
'dogs em. : thaD B : thog A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'dogs pa (td.) btags pa, gdags pa, thogs-
'chingba.
sku byug gi compl. : sku byugiB : abbr:skug gi sku byugi A; cf Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'byug pa
(td.) byugs pa, byug pa, byugs - skud pa. In ms. A the first ligature skug gi is marked with a continous
line of dots on top, cf. notes 1318, 1339.
baB: barA.
'tshal em. : tshaJB : btsal A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'tshaJ ba 1. (td.) btzaJ ba, btzaJ ba, 'tshol
- 2. (tmd.) 2) 'dod pa, 3) dgos pa.
bshagsem.: bshagA: abbr. shaDB; cf.liischke 1881: bshagpav. gshogpa; liischke 1881: gshogpa
I. sbst. v. shog pa; II. vb., also bshog pa, gshag pa, gsheg pa, 'chegs pa, pf. gshags, bshags, fut. gshag,
bshag, imp. gshog, 1. to cleave, to split, to break upon. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. gshog pa 1. (td.)
bshags pa, gshag pa, gshogs - dum bur gtong ba 'am gse ba. Illuminator, s.v. gshogpa - to split apart,
break into pieces, cut apart / up, to cleave, to slice up.
1cags B : lcag A.
gdong B : gdongs A.
'khams compl. : abbr. 'khaMs A : abbr. khaMs B.
gang em. : g,wgB: abbr. 'g+ha<ng>A; cf. liischke 1881: gangba1. full; whole.
sbyinem.: byinAB; cf Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. sbyinpa 1. (td.) byinpa, sbyin, sbyin.
sbyin A : byin B.
grogs thams cad bos shigcompl. : abbr. grog<s> thams cad bos 1 A: abbr. sprang po maMs bos shig
B.
pas khong A : nas kho B.
sde bzhi'iB23b3 : bde<'>'iA.
bsdusA: sdusB; cf. Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.v. sdudpa(td.) bsduspa, bsdu ba, sdus.
pasA :paB.
baB :paA.
paA:maB. .
spangs B : spang A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s. v.spang ba (td.) spangs pa, spang ba, spangs - gzhi
gcig tu gsog pa 'am sdud pa. .
nasA: teB.
sngagang zin regnang basB: snazin regnangpas A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. zinpa1. (tmd.)
2) thebs pa, ... rkun ma lag par zin pa.
136
Chapter 5
rgan 1541 po gcig na rei lha sar bla ma nga
1542
bzang zer ba mang po byung ste
1543
I 'bar ba pa dang
'di gnyis las
l544
drag pa ma byung I 'bar ba pas rinrgyab dar kha
1545
re'i thag bkye
1546
1 'dis rang
re bsod bde
1547
kha la dar kha gos kha
1548
gang zin re byung ba
1549
yin zer roll
[2.9.2.5]
bu1 rong du bzhugs
1550
dus/ko dkar gyi
1551
sha phyed gang zag
1552
la bzhagl mar gong gcig bya
(S311) rog , ga' yis1553 gang mthong
1554
la bzhag pa sogsl rdzas la ser sna mi mnga,1555 ba yin tel
bdog pa
1556
la bdag gir 'dzin pa dang bral ba'i phyirj1557 gser dngul gos dar sogs ci phu1 yang
spyan gzigs pa tsam ma gtogs
1558
gees spras su ' dzin pa'i phyag len dang! zhal ta sogs gang yang
mi mdzad doll
[2.9.2.6]
gzhan gyis1559 bshags kyang mi nyan pari khros nas
1560
(24.) gzhan la 'tshog pa dang I zhes
pa'i
1561
nyes pa yang mi mgna' stel bdag nyid chen p01562 gtsang
1563
du gshegs shu1 duJ chos rje
rnam gnyis rwa
1564
sgreng du byon dus
1565
1 nyin gcig bya bral
1566
du chos rje lotstsha basi chos
rje blo bzang grags
1567
pa la/ khyed yab sras gnyis kyis
1568
'dir zla ba gnyis gsum
1569
du sku
1541
1542
1543
1544
1545
1546
1547
1548
1549
1550
1551
1552
1553
1554
1555
1556
ISS7
1558
1559
1560
1561
1562
1563
1564
1565
1566
1567
1568
1569
rgan A: rgadB; cf. rganpo 1) lona sminpa;Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. rgadpo -lona che ba'i mi
ngaA: om.B.
steB: teA.
lasA :pasB.
rgyab dar kha A : rgyan dar kha dar kha B.
bkye B : skye A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'gyed pa (td.) bkyes pa, bkye ba, khyes 5) gtong ba
dang sbyin pa. Jiischke 1881: 'gyed pa 1. to diyide (trs.), to scatter, disperse, diffuse, e.g. rays of light;
nor 'gyed pa - to distribute (a property).
re bsod bde em. : re'i gsod de A : re bsod de B; Tashi Tsering: bs.od de = coil. for bsod nams. cf.
Goldstein 2001, s.Y. bsod bde- sm. bsod nams.
dar kha gos kha A : gos kha dar kha B.
baem. :paA: om. B.
bzhugscompl.: abbr. bzhuDB: bzhugA.
dkargyiB: kargyisA; cf. Tshigmdzod chenmo, S.Y. kokog.yagl)phaga-yagdangmamdzomo
las skyes pa 'i pho phyugs shig. Goldstein 2001, s.Y. ko ko g.yag 1. a hybrid yak.
zag em. : za{g} A : za B.
'ga' yisA: 'ga'IisB; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.y. 'ga'2. kha shasdang, kha cig ... mi 'ga:
mthongem.: mthorA: 'thorB.
mnga'B: 'da'A.
paB: baA.
braJ ba'iphyircompl.: abbr. braJ'iphyirB: abbr. biIiA.
gtogscompl. : gtoDB : gtog A.
gzhan gyis compl. : abbr. gzhan+yis B : gzhan gyi A.
nas A : abbr. p+sa B.
zhespa'icompl.: abbr. zhes'iB: cespa'iA.
chenpoA: abbr. chenosB.
gtsang B : rtsang A.
rwaA:mB.
dusB: duA.
bya braJA :jagmIB; cf. Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.y. bya braJl) 'jigrtengyi bya ba dangbraJ ba.
grags A : om. B. ..
yab sms gnyis kyis em. : abbr. yab sms 2 kyi A : yab 2 kyiB.
gnyis gsum compl. : abbr. 23 A : abbr. 3 B;
Text Edition 137
IIltshams dam p01570 mdzad nasi chos kyi 'bel
1571
gtam mang du mdzad pa yod par gda' ba
l572
1
dnmg Ije btsun pa la thun mong
1573
ma yin pa'i yon tan ci (63a) mnga' gsungs gi gda,1574 zhus
pasl bla ma'i yon tan mkhas btsun bzang gsum la
1575
chos mthun
l576
gyi mal 'byor ba dang
'brel
l577
ba der gda' zhus pas/
l578
de'ang min pa'i
1579
thun mong min pa
1580
'dra gsungs bdog
pa
1581
da Ian cis kyang gsungs par
1582
zhu zhus pas/bla ma'i yon tan chung ShOS
1583
gda,1584 lags
na'ang I sa skya nas 'chad nyan bshol tel bul rong du zhallog gzigs nasi tha ma da lta'i bar la
khong khro tsha 'khrug pa gcig kyang
l585
skyes ma myong gsung gin gda,1586 lags gsungs
1587
nasi spyan chab cher g.yos pasl chos Ije 10 tstsha bas kyang spyan chab btang nas gsung bton
1588
te bshums
1589
zhes thosl theg pa chen po spong byed cing I dam chos 'drar snang ston pa'oll
zhes pa'i nyes pa mi (S312) mnga' ste
1590
1 theg pa chen po dbu sems gnyisl rdo Ije theg pa dang
bcas pa phyin ci ma log par
1591
dgongs [B: shing bstan] pa'i phyir roll
[2.9.3]
nyon mongs lam du Sgyur1592 ba rig 'dzin gyi sdom pa la'ang nyes ltung gis1593 ma reg ste
1594
1
rtsa ba'i ltung ba bcu bzhi/ yan lag gi brgyad mams kyis
1595
phal cher
1596
ma gos shing I re re
157U
1571
1572
1573
1574
1575
157.
1577
1578
1579
1580
1581
1582
1583
1584
1585
1586
1587
1588
1589
1590
1:591
1592
1593
1594
1595
1596
mtshams dam po em. : abbr. mtshaM daM po A : abbr. 'tshaMs B.
'bel A: 'brelB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'bel gtam - don gcig rtsal du btan te bshad pa min par
bshad bya 'imam grangs sna tshags pa nas gleng ba 'i gtam.
pa yad par gda' ba A : yad par bda' B; cf. Jiischke 1881: gda' ba 1. to be (there), 2. with par it
expresses uncertainty, vagueness, gshegs par gda' - he may possibly go; 'di yin pa (col. for pai') gda'
- he seems to be this (man). .
thunmangcompl.: abbr. thuaMngA: abbr. thuangB.
gsungs kyi gda' em. : gsung gi gda' A : gs+ya gi bda 'B.
laB :paA.
mthun B: 'thun A.
'breI em. : bra! AB.
gda' zhuspasA: bda' zhusB.
de'angminpa'iA: abbr. de 'dramayin'iB.
paA :pa'iB.
bdag pa em. : bdag pas B : bsdag pa A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s. v. bdag pa 1. (tmd.) 'dug pa 'am
yadpa.
gsungs parcompl. : abbr. gs+yar B : gsung parA.
shas A : abbr. shasu B.
gda'A : bda 'B.
gcig lyangcompl. : abbr. Ilyang B : I {--} lyang A. In ms. A the ligature between I and lyangis
not only deleted, but on top also marked by dots (cf. note 1521).
gda'A: bda'B.
gsungs comp1. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
gsung btan em. : abbr. gs+ya gtan B : gsung gtan A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. btan pa 1. (td.)
btan pa, gdan pa, than.
bshums compl. : abbr. bshuMs A : abbr. bshuMB.
steB: teA.
log parcomp1. : abbr.Iagr B : logs parA.
sgyur B : bsgyur A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sgyur ba (td.) bsgyur pa, bsgyur ba, sgyur. Note
that here in ms. A not the prefix b is marked with dots, but the rest of the ligature, i.e. sgyur, which
here means that the latter is correct (cf. note 1585).
gisB :giA.
steem.: teAB.
kyisB: lyiA.
phal cher B : pha cher A.
138 Chapter 5
tsam byung srid na'ang dus las ma ' das par bshags
1597
sdom mdzad pa'i phyirl theg chen bslab
pa'i (24b) bsam sbyor nyams
1598
pa medl ees soil
sku'i spyod pa ma beos pa yin tel tshul 'ehos
l599
dang brall gsung gi spyod pa ma beos pa yin
te
1600
gzhogs slong
1601
kha gsag
1602
thob 'jaI
1603
sogs dang bral! thugs kyi spyod pa ma beos pa
1604
mams g.yeng
l605
g.yo Sgyu1606 sogs dang braIl gang byung gis ehog na! ei byas kyang bde ba
zhingl gzung 'dzin gyi 'khru! ba rang sar zhig nas/
1607
khyab gdal
1608
lhug pa'i spyod pa mdzad
doll
[2.10 Verse 10]
[10] tshe 'di bIos btang sgrub pa snying por mdzadl
bden bzhi
1609
rten 'breI phyin drug rim gnyis bsgoms
l6lO
I
phyag rgya chen po mchog gi dngos grub bmyes
1611
1
nyams len (63b) mam dag khyod la phyag 'tshaIloll
zhes
1612
pa nil kho bo dben par
1613
bsten
1614
pa'i rgyu mtshan yang I 'khor dang grogs kyis yid
sun phyung ba'am
1615
1 myed
1616
bkur grags pa 'dod [B: pa'i] phyir ma yin gyi1617 I gzhan du nal
'khor
1618
ba'i sdug bsngaI me[B: 'i] 'obs Itar shin tu bmag
1619
dka' bar mthong ba'i phyirl
1597
1598
1599
1600
1601
1602
1603
1604 .
160S
160.
1607
1608
1609
1610
1611
1612
1613
1614
1615
1616
1611
1618
1619
bzhags em. : abbr. gshaD B : gshag A.
nyamscompl.: abbr. nyaMsB: nyamA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. nyamspa 1. (tmd.) 'jigpa
dang, rgud pa, ... tshuJ khrims nyams pa.
'chosB: chosA.
payin teB :pasA.
gzhogs siongcompi. : abbr. gzhoD slong B : bzhogs slongs A.
gsagem.: zagAB.
'jal em. : 'byalB : mjab A.
paA:om.B.
mam g.yeng B : abbr. maMs sem9 A.
g.yo sgyu B : g.yo rgyu A.
sogs dang braJ, gang byung gis chog na, ci byas kyang bde ba zhing, gzung 'dzin gyi 'khruJ ba rang sar
zhig nas em. : abbr. swo dang braJ, gang byung gis chog nB, ci byas kyang bde ba A : abbr. soD dang
brai zhing, zung 'dzin gyi 'khrul pa rang sar zhig nas B.
gdalB : brdal A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. khyab brdal-khyab gdal dang 'drs.
bzhi compi. : abbr. 4B : abbr. 2 A; cf. p. 70, yerse 10.
bsgomsem.: abbr. bsgoMA: abbr. sgoMB.
bmyes B : bmyed A.
zhes B : ces A.
parem. : pa AB; cf. Iiischke 1881: dbenpa- solitary, lonely; solitude, loneliness; dben par 'gIo ba or
gnaspa.
bsten em. : brten AB; cf. Ye shes rgyal mtshan 896.6.
ba'amA: ba'iB.
myedB : myed{-} A.
gyiB: gyisA.
'khorB: (-}'kMrA.
bmagem.: magA: gnagB; cf. Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.y. mogpa(td.) 1. bmagspa, bmagpa,mogs
2) bzod pa, ... na tsha bmag dka' ba.
Text Edition
[2.10.1]
de yang' di ltar/
(1) srid pa'i phun tshogs shin tu1620mnog1621 chung zhing /
rab mang nyes pa'i tshogs dang ldan rig nasi
rang gzhan srid pa'i mtsho las bsgral
1622
bya'i phyir/
mang thos bdag ni dben pa'i gnas SU
1623
, gro/
(2) char sdod byi 'US
1624
'brug sgra thos pa ltar/
dben pa'i gtam 'di kho bo'i snying la 'bab/
thos (8313) pa'i don mams don yod bya ba'i phyir/
gzhon nu blo gros dben pa'i gnas SU
1625
'gro/
(3) ngang pa'i tshogs kyis1626 padmo'i mtsho mthong ltar/
bas mtha'i gnas la kho bo sems rab g.yo/
dal 'byor Ius la snying po blang ba'i
1627
pyhir/
gzhonnu blo gros dbenpa'i gnas SU
1628
'gro/
(4) bung ba gzhon nus
1629
'dab brgya'i tshal mthong ltar/
kho bo'i yid ni dben pa'i ro
1630
la chags
l631
/
ting 'dzin bdud rtsi'i
I632
ro de myang bya'i phyir/
gzhon nu blo gros dben pa'i gnas SU
1633
(2Sa) , gro/
(5) dpyid dus bsil ba'i ma la ya
1634
rlung ltar/
nags
1635
kyi sman Ijongs
1636
kho bo'i yid la 'bab/
shin tuAB: deltarRY.
139
1620
1621
1622
1623
1624
1625
1626
1627
1628
1629
1630
1631
1632
1633
1634
1635
1636
mnogem. : gnog B : sdog A; cf. Jiischke 1881: mnog pa, mnog chung- insignificant, trifling.
bsgralRY : sgral AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. bsgral ba - sgroI ba 'i 'das pa dang ma 'ongs pa.
gnas su compl. : abbr. gnasu AB : nags RY.
charsdodbyi'usem.: charsdod byi'uA: char 'dod byi'usB: char 'dod byi'uR: charsdod bye'uY.
gnassucompl.: abbr. gnasuAB: nagsRY.
kyis BRY : kyi A.
ba'iBRY:pa'iA.
gnassucompl.: abbr.gnasuAB: nagsRY.
gzhon nus RY : abbr. gzhonus B : gzhonu A.
roABY:dR.
chagsRY: abbr. ch+yaB: chagA.
bdud rtsi'iRY : abbr. bdud'i AB.
gnas su em : abbr.gnasuAB: nagsRY.
ya BY: ya'iR : yang A.
nagsRY: naDB: nagA.
/jongs BY : sjongs A : /jon R; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. sman gyi /jongs (mngon) spang Ii
140 Chapter 5
nyon mongs bdud kyi sde de gzhom bya'i phyirl
gzhon nu bl0 gros dben pa'i gnas SU
1637
'grol gsungs
l638
nas/
1639
[B: de dus sui] sa skya'i brgya dpon dang I bzang Idan gyi mkhan po sogsl mdzad pa'i zhu ba
phul nas/
1640
mi 10 bco brgyad
1641
kyi bar du bstan pa la
l642
bsamsj1643 'chad nyan byas nasi [B:
da] rgas kha 'dir sde gog p01644 gcig la mi 'jug (63b7) gsungs tel
[2.10.2]
[B: (1) 'jig rten 'dren pa lha (25a3) mi'i ston pa yis16451
'dod la sred
l646
pa phung kro1
1647
rtsa bar bstanl
'dod pa'i yon tan sdug bsngal bskyed pa stel
nad dang
l648
'bras dang zug rngu'i rtsa ba yin!
(2) ji ltar mdze can g.yan pa 'phrug
1649
pa dang I
tsha ba'i nad can bsil ba'i1650 chu dang niJ1651
skom pas nyen la Ian tshwa'i
1652
chu 'thungs
1653
bzhin/
'dod pa bsten pas nam yang ngoms mi 'gyurl
(3) dug dang bcas pa'i kha zas (Mllb) g.yos legs
1654
dang I
spu gri'i so la chags pa'i sbrang rtsi dang I
shing rta 'dren pa'i phyugs kyis rtswa zos bzhinl
'dod pa'i yon tan mnog
1655
chung nyes pa rnang I
1631
1638
1639
164.
1641
1642
1643
1644
1645
164.
1647
1648
164.
1650
1651
1652
1653
1654
1655
gnassucompl.: abbr. gnasllAB: nagsRY.
gsungsem.: gsungAB.
These five verses are the verses 9-13, contained m Zhal gdams 56.15-57.8. They could not be identi-
fied in M so far. The verses are also contained in Ye shes rgyal mtshan 896.10-897.7. In Zhal gdams
they are subsumed under the main headline Red mda' ba gzhon nil bio gros kyi zhal gdams khag.
nas A : na yang B.
beo brgyad compl. : abbr. be+yodB : abbr. bewo brgyad A.
iaA: om. B.
bsamscompl.: abbr. bsaMsB: abbr. bsaMA.
gog po compl. : abbr. gogo A : gog B.
yis MRY : yi<s> B.
sredM : zhen BRY.
phung khroi em. : phung krolBY : phung groiM : khong khro 'iR. Cf. Red mda' ba's commentary on
Nagiirjuna's ietter(Samath 2005: 41.13). Acc. to Tashi Tsermg phung and phung (b)khroiare syno-
nym and mean "something like suffering/trouble." Cf. l1ischke 1881: 'phung ba, 'phung diaoi or khroi
- the decay of fortune, ruin, destruction. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. phung - nyams pa'am nyes pa.
nad dang MRY : abbr. nadng B.
'phrugBM :phrugsRY.
bsil ba'iMY: bsii'iB: sredpa'iR.
ehu dang niM : <ehu dang ni>B.
skom pas nyen ia ian tshwa'iM : <skom pas nyen pa ian tshwa 'i> B : skom pas nyen pa ian tshwa'i
RY. 0
'thungs BMY: 'thung R.
kha zas g.yos iegs MRY : abbr. g.yos ieD kha zas B.
mnog R : gnog BMY; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. mnog 1) spogs dang khe phan.
Text Edition 141
(4) glang chen dri la chags pa'i sbrang bu dang I
regon pa'i glu dbyangs nyan pa'i ri dwags
1656
dang I
lcags kyu'i sha la chags pa'i nya bzhin dul
, dod 1a rkam pa'i byis pa myur du brlagl
ces solll657
de ltar klog pa thos bsam gyi (2Sa6) 'khor los bstan pa dang sems can gyi don rgya .chen po
mdzad nasI spong ba bsam gtan
1658
gyi 'khor los bstan pa dang sems can gyi don mdzad pa'i
phyirr
659
[2.10.3]
sku tshe 'di'i phun tshogs
1660
thams cad spangs nas
1661
1 gangs bu Ie dkar po'i g.yas
1662
mgul g.yu
lung rdo Ije ljongs
1663
(2Sb) gi dben gnas su Sgrub
1664
pa la byon nasI 10 lnga'i bar du rtse gcig tu
Sgrub
1665
pa mdzad pa'i tshe
1666
1 gang zag gi (64a) bdag med gtan la 'bebs pa nyan thos kyi
lam
1667
1 bden bzhi mi rtag [B: pal sogs skad cig ma
1668
bcu drug
1669
bsgomsl bzung ba
1670
chos
kyi bdag med
l67J
gtan la 'bebs
I672
pa rang rgyal gyi lam
1673
1 rten 'breI yan lag bcu gnyis lugs
'byung lugs ldog du bsgoms/
1674
, dzin pa chos kyi bdag med gtan
1675
la 'bebs
l676
pa byang sems c
kyi lam
1677
1 pharol tu phyin pa drug 'khor gsum (8314) mam dag tu bsgoms
l678
1 nyon mongs lam
1656
1657
1658
1659
1660
1661
1662
1663
1664
1665
1666
1667
1668
1669
1670
1671
1672
1673
1674
167,
1676
1677
1678
dwagsRY: dagsM: daDB.
These four verses are not contained in manuscript A, but in manuscript B. They stem from the Minor
Works, text no. 12: 'dodpa'i nyes dmigs la brts,amspa'i tshigs su bcadpa, 033-034: pp. lla5-11b3,
ePN, no. 006117 (not included), mdzad pa po Sakya'i dge slong gZhon nu blo gros. The verses are
also contained in ZhaJ gdams 54.3-13. They are no longer part of Red mda' ba's autobiography (rang
roam), but come after another text in between. The verses are also contained in Ye shes rgyal mtshan
897.7-14.
bsam gtan compl. : abbr. bstaMn B.
These five extra lines from the beginning of section 2.10.2 up to here marked with brackets [ ... ] are not
contained in ms. A, but only in ms. B and end B25a7.
phun tshogs compl. : abbr. phuoD[tsa rtagsJB : phun tshog A.
nasA: teB. .
g.yas B : gings A.
ijongs em. : ijong B : 40ng A.
sgrub B : bsgrub A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sgrub pa 1. (td.) bsgrubs pa, bsgrub pa, sgrubs.
tu sgrub em. : tu bsgrub A : sgrub B.
tshe B : tshes A.
kyi lam compl. : abbr. kyi laMB: gyi sgom A.
skad cig ma em. : skad 1 A : skad ma B.
bcu drugcompl. : abbr. bc+rog AB.
baB :om.A.
bdag medB : abbr. bded A.
'bebs B: 'beb A.
lam compl. : abbr. laMB: abbr. sgoM A.
bsgoms B : abbr. sgoM A.
gtan B : bstan A.
'bebsB: 'bebA.
lam compl. : abbr. laMB: abbr. sgoM A.
bsgoms B : sgom A.
142
Chapter 5
du Sgyur1679 ba rig 'dzin gyi lam/
1680
bskyed!681 rdzogs zung 'jug tu bsgoms
1682
pas phyag rgya
chen po mchog gi
1683
dngos grub bmyed
1684
pa yin tel
mal 'byor rdo rje'i sku la rtag bzhugs
1685
pal
ting 'dzin yongs su rdzogs pa'i yan lag ste
1686
1
de ni rdo rje sems dpa' zhes su brjod/1687
bde gshegs mams kyi dbang mchog bzhi par grags
1688
1 rni gnas myangan 'das pa'ang de yin tel
phyag rgya chen po'i dngos grub dam pa thobl ces gsungsl
de dus sui gangs can gyi bshad sgrub pa
1689
kun gyi 1690 rna rtogs pa dang I log par rtog pa dang I
the tshom gyi
1691
sgro 'dogsl thams cad gcod par byed pa'i
1692
gnas dam par gyur cing I kun
mkhyen bzhin du dri ba kun gyi Ian 'debs par mdzad doll
[2.11 Verse 11]
[11] thugs darn zab mo gnad
1693
du snun pa'i rtagsl
bla rna yi darn mkha' 'gro chos skyong sogsl
rgyun du gzigs kyang rang rgyal brtul zhugs
1694
bsten
1695
1
ngo mtshar rmad
1696
byung khyod la phyag 'tshalloll
zhes
1697
panil gong du bstanpa'i thugs damzab mo de daggis nyinmtshankhoryug tu 'da' ba'i
tshe dag pa'i snang ba bsam gyis
1698
rni khyab pa gzigs kyang I rang rgyal bzhin du rni smra ba'i
brtul zhugs bsten
1699
par mdzad doll
1679
1680
168}
1682
1683
1684
1685
1686
1687
1688
1689
1690
1691
1692
1693
1694
1695
1696
1697
1698
1699
sgyurB: {b}sgyurA.
Jam compl. : abbr. JaMB: sgom A.
bskyed A : skyedB.
bsgoms B : abbr. sgoMs A.
mchog gi compl. : abbr. mchogiB : abbr. mchogis A.
bmyedA: bmyesB.
bzhugs A: abbr. zhuDB.
steA: teB.
zhes su bIjod A : zhes bIjod do B.
grags comp!. : abbr. grag+s A : graD B.
sgrubpaem.: sgrubB: bsgrubpaA.
kun gyi em. : abbr. kun+yis B : kun gyi A.
gyiB :kyiA.
gcod par byed pa 'i A : gcod pa'iB.
gnad A : snadB.
zhugscompl.: abbr. zhuDB : shugA; cf. p. 70, verse II; see also note 61.
bsten em. : rten AB.
nnadB : smad A; cf. note 3.
zhes B : ces A.
gyis B : gyi A.
zhugs bsten compl. : abbr. zhuD bsten B : shug brten A.
Text Edition
143
[2.11.1]
'ga' yar
l700
(260) gyis drung pas thugs dam mdzad pa
1701
la rtags
l702
khyad par can ci byung
lag
s170J
zhus pasl mftshe chos la skyel
1704
ba la rtags than thun yod srid de mi bshad
l70S
'jig rten
gyil706 bya ba chung ngu [B: re] la'ang (64b) gsangs
l707
nas bsgrubs
l708
na 'grub kyin 'dug pal
rtags mams bshad na
l709
nyams par 'gyur zhing I mkha' 'gro yang
l710
mi mnyes par
l7l1
'dug
gsungsl712 nasi ched du (S315) gnyerl713 nas zhus pa
17l4
phal cher mi gsungsl yengs ma lam
l71s
la
thol gsungs pa dang I dben sar yang yang nan gyiSl7l6 zhus pa [B: la] gsungs pa re re
l717
tsam
bdag gis thos pa 'di Itar lagsl
[2.11.2]
bu ler bla margyal bzang pasl mkhan chen g.yag pa'i gsungs nasi slob dpon [B: chen po] gzhon
blo ba'i1718 dbu ma la'ang rgyud pa'i
17l9
bla rna med! nga yang slob dpon med rung ston gsung
ba
l720
dang Ila la na rei zla grags kyi sku'i skye ba yinlla la na rei zla grags
l721
la dngos su chos
gsan zer ba [B: mams] gang lags
l722
zhus pasl dbu rna'i tshig gi brgyud
l723
pa ni yod! don gyi
brgyud
1724
pa yod pa
1725
dka' mor 'dug! dpalldan zla grags pa'i
1726
skye ba min par thag
l727
chod!
1700
1101
1702
1703
1104
1705
1706
1707
1708
1109
1710
1711
1112
1113
1714
1115
1716
1717
1118
1119
1720
1721
1722
1723
1724
172S
1726
1727
Cf. note 1386.
pa B : pa{'i} A. Note that in ms. A the letter 'i is circled by dots, which here means that it needs to be
deleted (c note 1521).
rtags compl. : abbr. rtaD B : rtag A.
lagscompl. : abbr.laDB: laA.
skyel em. : skyaJ AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. skycJ ba (td.) bskyal ba, bskyaJ ba, skyo14) yol
bar byed pa, ... mi tshe don dang ldan par bskyaJ.
bshadB : shad A.
gyi A : <la> B.
gsangs B : bsangs A; c gsang ba I. (td.) gsangs pa, gsang ba, gsongs - sbed pa dang, gzhan la mi
mngon par byed pa.
bsgrobscompl. : abbr. bsgrob+sAB.
bshad na A : om. B.
yang B : <'ang> A.
parB :paA.
'duggsungscompl.: abbr. 'duggs+yaB : abbr. 'dugsungA.
gnyerB: mnyerA.
paB : pars} A. Note that in ms. A the suffix -sis marked by dots (c note 1521).
malam compl. : abbr. malaM A: langangB; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.y. yengsmalam -mam
g.yeng gi ngang tshuJ.
yang yang nan gyis em. : nan gyis yang yang B : yang yang nan gyi A.
rereA: reB.
ba'iA :pa'iB.
rgyud pa 'i compl. : rgyud pa<i> A: abbr. rgyud'iB.
gsung ba em. : gsung pa A : abbr. gs+ya ba B.
grogscompl. :abbr.groDB :grogA.
lags compl. : abbr. la<D> A : abbr. laD B.
brgyud em. : rgyud AB.
brgyud em. : rgyud AB.
yod pa B : yong pa{--} A.
zla ba grogs pa 'i A : zla ba'iB.
thag B : abbr. thag+s A.
144 Chapter 5
chos nmyan1728 rna nmyan1729 dpon slob nang byan
1730
chud cing mi phyed pa'i dad pa thob par
grags
1731
/ rned
1732
na log Ita skye ba'i rgyur'gyur gsungs
l733
/
bdag gis
1734
drung pa'i sku gsung thugs kyi spyod pa ci ston
1735
yang yon tan du rnthong ba rna
gtogsl736/ skyon du mi rtog par
1737
rnchis pas/ cis kyang gsung bar zhu zhus pas/ yug1738 gcig ci
yang mi gsungs par
1739
'dug/ yengs rna ngang la dpalldan zla ba rig 'dzin gyi go 'phang
l740
bmyes nasi ding sang yang rgya gar na bzhugs yod pa (26b) yin! skalldan gyi gdul bya rjes su
'dzinpa lalkhong gi drung rang du snyag dgos pa yang rna yin
1741
gsung ba dang /blarna lha
pas phyag rdor
1742
grub thob tu mi rkang btsugs
1743
btang nasi slob dpon gzhon blo dang/ byang
pa 'jam dbyangs kyis gcig gis Ita log gi bdag rkyen byas
1744
gcig gis1745Ita log dar rgyas su byas
pa 'di (65a) phyi rna gar skye gsang bdag la (83\6) zhu grogs1746 zhu byas pas/ phyag rdor grub
thob kyis gsang bdag la zhus ba'i Ian lal slob dpon gzhon blo ba
1747
theg pa chen po'i gang zag
khyad par can
1748
yin! khong gi Ita ba de yang / zla grags kyis rmi lam du bstan pa yin
gsungs
l749
/ 'jam dbyangs pa ' di/ sa pal). gyi dngos slob mi phyed pa'i
l750
dad pa thob
1751
pa gcig
yin! da Ita longs spyod dang ldan pa yang
1752
/ sa pal).la tshogs 'khor gcig zhus pa'i mam smin
1753
yin zer ba'i Ian khyer ' ongs pas/ lha pa na ref de ga 1754 yin! phyag rdor gyi 1755 grub thob gcig yod
1728
InO
1730
1731
1732
1733
1734
1735
1136
1737
1738
1739
1740
1741
1742
1743
1744
1745
1746
1741
1748
1749
1750
1151
1752
1753
1754
1755
mnyan B : nyan A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. nyan pa 1. (td.) mnyan pa, mnyan pa, nyon 1) thos
par byed pa 'am ma bas sgra len pa.
mnyan B : nyan A.
byanA: chanB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. nang byan2) khongdu chudpa'am ngcsparshespa.
thob par grags A : thob pa yod na drag B.
medB:minA.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
Mag gis compl. : abbr. Magis B : Maggi A.
ston B : ton A.
gtogsem. : abbr. rtoDB : rtog A.
parA:paB.
yug B : abbr. abbr. yuD A.
gsungs parem. : abbr. gs+ya barB: gsung bar A.
'phang A: 'phangs B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. go 'phang.
yang ma yin A : abbr. myin B.
rdor B : {rda} rdor A. Note that the first ligature is marked by dots as described above.
btsugscompl.: abbr. btsuDB: btsugA.
gcig gis Ita log gi bdag rkyen byas em. : abbr. <1 gi Ita logi rdag rkyen byas> A : abbr. 1 gis ita log
Mag rkyen byas B.
glsB :giA.
grogs em. : grog A : abbr. roD B.
baA :paB.
can B : spyan A.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
phyedpa'iA: ched'iB; cf. Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.v. miphyedpa 1) 'gyurldog medpa'am, brtan
po.
thob B : thobs A.
longs spyod dang ldan pa yangcompl. : abbr. J+yaudng ldan pa yang B : longs spyod dang ldan pa {'i}
<yang>A.
smin B : nnin A.
gaA: kaB; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. deka -dega dang 'dm;Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. dega
- de yin pa nyiddu ngos gzung ba'i tshig cig. Goldstein 2001, s.v. de ga mng- just as one says,
correct, 2. that's right!
gyiA:kyiB.
Text Edition
145
na nga'i rua!756 bar thos dogS!757 rued zer ro
1758
//
de'i 10 rgyus bdag nyid chen po la klong!759 rtser zhus pas/ khong gi yid la nga drnyal bar skye
ba 'dug zer!760 ba gcig 'ong!76! du re ba yin tel de rang mi 'ong
1762
rnem gsungs
1763
/
[B: bla rna Iha pa drung pa la yang yang bskur ba
1764
'debs pa Ial khong rang gi sgrub pa rno
rgan rno geig na rei slob dpon gzhon blo pa la de tsam la skyon rndzad doll .
khong gangs kyi rngul spang sdings geig na ehos gsung gi 'dug pas/ ehos nyan mkhan bsarn
gyis mi khyab eing / ri tharns cad kyang khong gi phyogs su rngo bo bdud
1765
nas nyan gyi
gda,1766 lags zhus pas/ mi tshe sgrub pa la phyin
1767
pa'i nyarns kyi tshul
1768
/ de ka bdenl ngo
shes zer ro//r
769
[2.11.3]
yang (27a) bul rong
1770
du bzhugs pa'i177! dus/ zhabs skor
l772
rndzad 'phro Ial kho de brag kha
1773
ya gi na sgroI rna gcig bzhugs kyin 'dug gsungs
1774
/ gang na gda' 1775 lags zhus pas/ phyag rndzub
btsugs
1776
nas ya gi [B: na] gsungs / mi gda'1777Iags zhus pas/ de ka yin sung ngo
1778
//
1756
1757
1758
1759
1760
176}
1762
1763
1764
1765
1766
1767
1768
1769
1770
1771
1772
1773
1774
1775
1776
1777
1778
maB: snaA
dogs em. : dog A : doD B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. dogs pa 1. (tmd.) the tshom za ba; 2. the
tshom.
zer ro B : gsung zero A Note that in ms. A gsungis marked with dots.
klongem.: slongA: bJongB.
zerA: gsungB.
'ongB: yongA; cf. note 955.
'ong B : yongs A; cf. note 955.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A
baem. :paB.
mgo bo bdud compl. : abbr. mgau bdudB : cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. mgo sgur ba 1) mgo bo dud
pa; Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. 'dud pa 1. (td.) btud pa, gdud pa, thud - gus par .. zhabs la 'dud
pa, ... mgo btud pa.
gyi gda 'em. : kyi bda 'B.
phyin compl. : phykn> B.
nyams kyi tshul compl. : abbr. {kham} <nyaMs kyi> tshulB.
The passage in square brackets [B: ... ] is missing in ms. A.
mng B : mngs A
bzhugspa'iem.: abbr. bzhuDB: bzhugpa'iA
skorB: bskorA
brag kha B : ba brag A.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
gda'A: bda'B.
mdzub btsugs em. : abbr. 'dzub dsuD B : 'dzub gtsug A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. mdzub mo
'dzugspa - 'di dang 'di'ozhesmdzubsorthadkarsnunpa;Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. 'dzugspa (td.)
btsugs pa, gzugs pa, tshugs.
gsungs mi gda' em. : abbr. gs+ya mi bda 'B : gsung mi gda ' A
gsung ngo A : gsung B.
146
Chapter 5
[2.11.4]
dmu rdzing
1779
du gsang , dus kyi rgyud gsungs
1780
dus sgmb chen rna dpal mo'i dbon mo sgrub
chung rna yang nyan gyin
1781
yod pa chos thun gyi 'go' dzugs
1782
nasi grol grol gyi1783 bar rgyun
du rgod pa thengs 'ga' yar
1784
byung /Jjes sukhyod
1785
rgod pa ci yin dris
l786
pas/ mkha' 'gro'i
rigs bsamgyis
1787
mi khyab pakha dog [B: dang] rgyan dang / gos dang/ spyod tshul mi 'dra ba
du rna chos nyan du byung ba
l788
la rgod pa yin zer [B: rol]/
[2.11.5]
chos rje blo bzang pa dpon slob '0 de (65b) gung rgyal gyi gangs la bzhugs dus/ dgong1789 mo
thun gtor gcig la 'tshogs
l790
par rtogs ldan 'jam dpal rgya mtshos
1791
(8317) nammkha' la mkha'
'gro'i tshogs mang du 'dus nasi bstod pa 'di 'don kyin1792 'dug pa gzigs/
gangs bu Ie dkar po'i g.yas
1793
mgul na!
mal 'byor [gyi] dbang phyug red mda' ba
1794
/
mtha' bral gyi
l795
dbu rna thugs su chud!
[B: dmigs med kyi thugs Ije rgyun chad med/]
rgyud sde'i
l796
mthar thug dpal gsang 'dus/
thun mong
l797
rna yin klu sgmb lugs/
[B: ji bzhin gzigs pa'i mkhyen pa can
'dro ba'i 'dren mchog khyod la 'dud! ces so/I]
1779
1780
1781
1782
1783
1784
1785
1786
1787
1788
1789
1790
1191
1792
1793
1794
1795
1796
1797
dmu rdzingem. : dbu rdzing B : smu rcizing A; SeD anu = dmu; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. dmu
rdzing -ius skrangs shing chu bsags nas rdzing bu 'i nang chus khengs pa itar gyur pa'i chu nad cig.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
gyin B : gin A.
chos thun gyi 'go 'dzugs em. : abbr. chos thun+yi mgo zug B : chos (-}thun gyi mgo zug A; cf. Tshig
mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'go 'dzugs - bya ba thog mar byed pa.
groi groi gyi A : groi groiB; cf. Illuminator, s.y. groi ba, tshogs 'du groi ba - the meeting adjonmed.
SCD, s.y. 'groi bapf. bkroJ, fut. dgrol
thengs 'ga' yar B: 'ga' yar A; cf. note 1700.
khyod A : khyedB.
dris A : byas B.
gyis B : gyi A.
baB :paA.
dgong A : dgongs B.
gcig ia 'tshogsem. : abbr. 1ia 'tshogA: abbr.ia tshoDB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. thungtor2)
mtshams thun gyi mthar 'bul gtor.
'jam dpai rgya mtshos compl. : abbr. 'jaM dpaJ rgya mtsho<s> A : abbr. 'jaM] rgy[tsa rtagsjos B.
kyin A : gyiB.
g.yasA: sharB.
mda' baem.: mda'paA: 'da'paB.
brai gyi A : abbr. bral+yiB.
sde'iB : sde A.
thun mongcompl. : abbr. thuoMng A : abbr. thuongs B.
Text Edition
147
[2.11.6]
bul rong du bzhugs dusl mi nag po chung se
179S
bal gdong pa bzhi yod pa gcig gtor rna len du
byung ba
1799
lalkhyed gang nas 'ongs byas pasl ti se
1SOO
nas 'ongs zerl zhal bzhi pa yin (27b) par
grags soil
nye gnas mchog legs lamdang
1801
chos skyong chungba de 'ongs
1802
'dugpasl gtorma 'bags
1803
'dug
lS04
1 da man chad
lS05
rna 'bag
1S06
pa gyis
1807
gsungs pa danglSOSI mdang
1809
pu tra
lSIO
de
'ongs
lSll
kha lhag lhag
1812
nas so gsod
lS13
rna bcug gsungs
1S14
1
[2.11.7]
dmu rdzing
1S15
du rgyud mchod byas dusl sgrub chung mas gzigs pas! bdag nyid chen po'i mgul
nas 'jig rten dbang phyug mas mkhyud nas
1S16
thod pa sha lnga
l817
bdud rtsi lngas gang ba drung
pa la yang zhus
l818
1 khong rang yang gsol gyin1819 'dug zerl
bul rong du tshogs
1S20
'khor gcig gi dus sui bla rna sgrub
1S21
pa dpaV slob dpon sangs rgyas dpaV
bdag dang gsum yod pa la
l822
1 drung gi gsungs
1S23
nasi nga'i yid la da rang sangs rgyas kyi bstan
1798
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1801
1808
1809
1810
1811
1812
1813
1814
1815
1816
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
chung seB : abbr. chungngeA; cf. Jaschke 1881: chung ba 1. adj. col. chung ngu, also chung se, little
small.
baB :paA.
tiseB: teseA..
mdangem. : 'dang A 'dang B; cf. Jiischke 1881: mdang, also mdangs 1. yesterday evening, last night.
ba de 'ongsB cpa deyongsA; cf. note 955.
'bags B : abbr. <'baD> A; ID: polluted? Tashi Tsering: cut? Cf. SCD, s.v. 'bag pa 1. to defile, pollute
oneself; to soil, make filthy; 2. to take away, steal, rob. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'bag pa 1. (tmd.)
'bags pa, 'bag pa 1) 'go ba dang, nyams pa, 2) longs su spyad nas zad pa .. .2 .. .1) btsog pa. Goldstein
2001, s.v. 'bag pa - to be defiled! polluted! desecrated.
'dugA: 'dugzerB.
man chadA: marbcadB. Another spelling according to Goldstein 2001, s.v. man cad
'bagA: abbr. 'baDB.
Nitartha, s.v. gJis- will (at the end ofa verbal clause).
gsungs pa dang em. : abbr. gs+ya ba dang B : gsungs pas A.
mdangem. : 'dang AB.
pu mem.: spu traA cpu TaB.
'ongs A: 'ongs nasB; cf. note 955.
kha lhag 1hag A : kha 1a lhaD lhaD B.
gsod em. : sodB : bsod du A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. so gsod pa - zing med skyid la dbang
thang 'phel ba; SeD, S.v. so gsod = skyid po cig- comfortable.
bcug gsungs compl. : abbr. bcug gs+ya B : abbr. bcugsung A.
dmurdzingem.: dmurdzingB: smurdzingsA.
mkhyud nas A: 'khyud de B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. mkhyudpa- (td.) gsang ba'am sbedpa.
1nga B : lnga 'i A.
zhusem. : zhuAB; cf. Tshigmdzod chen mo, s.v. zhu ba 1.(td.) zhuspa, zhu ba, zhus.
gyin A : kyin B.
tshogscompl.: abbr. tshoDB: tshogA.
sgrub B : bsgrub A.
laB: 1asA.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
148 Chapter 5
pa mal rna 1824 med bsams
1825
na' ang I 'u rgyud mgo ' chad
1826
nas ma grol gyi barl 'jig rten dbang
phyug ma'i rta'i
1827
rmig pa zad zad skor ba byed pa Sgrub
1828
chung ma des mthong zer gyin1829
'dug! da dung yang bstan pa
1830
a tho
1831
yang yod par 'dug (66a) gsungs
1832
1
[2.11.8]
bul rang du Ita
1833
khridkyi gsol 'debs mdzad dUS(S318) mtshanmo budmed
1834
dkarmo gsum
'ongs
1835
nasi gsol 'debs de la skogs1836 'di 'dra gcig mdzad par zhu zer nasi khong mams kyis
skogs 'di byas nas
1837
blangs soil
[2.11.9]
yang bul rong du Sgrub
1838
chungma la rim Inga'i dmigs
1839
pa zhag bcu gsum tsam
1840
nas re re
'bogs
1841
kyin1842 yod pa lal dmigs
1843
pa gcig zhag gnyis tsam las pa
1844
lal mi gzhon gos dkar po
gyon pa gcig 'ongs nas chu chu me [B: me] gtong
1845
I tshod ma skol
1846
ba sogs g.yog gang
dgos byed cing I gtam mi zer ba cig byung I Sgrub
1847
chung mas kyang ye (28a) ma lab
1848
1
dmigs
1849
pa zhu ru phyin dus zhag gnyis tsam gyi gong du mi gzhon de 'byung ba'i
1850
10 rgyus
1824
1825
1826
1827
1828
1829
1830
1831
1832
1833
1834
18)5
1836
1837
1838
1839
1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
11145
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
mal ma B : {--}<mal> ma A (below line 7); cf. Goldstein 2001, s.v. mal ma - truthful, righteous,
correct, proper, real.
bsams compl. : abbr. bsaMs B : abbr. bsaM A.
'chadB : <'>chad A; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.v. 'chad' p. bshad; f. bshad; imp. shod-to say/speak/teach.
ma'irta'iA: madre'uB.
skorba byedpa sgrob em. : bskorba byedpa bsgrubA : bskor ba byedpa sgrobB; cf. Jaschke 1881:
skor ba, phyag dang skor ba byed pa. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. skor ba 2. thog mtha' med pa'i
dbyigs sgro sgor, ... skor ba gcig brgyab pa, ... nng thung skor ba gnyis 'khor ba zhig 'dug ... skor
lam, ... chos skor, ... bon skor, ... nang skor, ... phyi skor, ... bar skor.
gym A : gyiB.
paB:palaA.
tho A : do B; Tashi Tsering: a tho special Sakya coIL language mean o.k., alright, not bad. Cf. SeD,
S.v. a tho ba - beautiful, good. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. a tho ba (mying) bzang po.
'dug gsungs compL : abbr. 'dug gs+ya B : abbr. 'duD gsung A.
ltaB: rtaA.
budmedcompL: abbr. buedAB.
'ongsB: yongsA; cf. note 955.
skogsem. : kog A : lkog B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. skogs pa 3) shubs,. .. yig skogs;Tshig mdzod
chen mo, s. v. yig skogs - 'phrin yig Jug snod kyi phyi shubs.
mamsskogs 'di byasnasem.: abbr. maMskyikog 'di byasnasA: abbr. maMs+yilkog 'diB.
sgrob B : bsgrob A.
illnigs compL : abbr. illniD B : illnig A.
bcu gsum tsam compL : abbr. bcu gsuM tsaM A : abbr. bcuM tsaMB.
'bogscompL: abbr. 'boDB: 'bogA.
kyin A : kyiB.
illnigscompL: abbr. dmiDB: dmigA.
tsam las pa compL : abbr. tsaM las pa B : abbr. tsaMs la A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. las pa 1.
(td.) las pa, las pa, los - byed pa.
gtong B : thong A.
skolB : kolA.
sgrub B : bsgrob A.
lab em. : labs AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. lab pa (td.) lab pa, lab pa, lob - Ijod pa dang 'chad
pa.
dmigscompL: abbr. dmiDB: dmigA.
'byungba'iem.: byungba'iA: 'ongspa'iB.
Text Edition 149
zhus nasi ci lags sam
I85I
zhus pas/ ci yin mi shes khyed rang
I852
dge sbyor la 'bungs/ ngas kyang
dmigs
1853
pa gzung gis gsungs
I854
/ log nas phyin pas mi de da dung
1855
sngar bzhin g.yog gang
dgo
s
byed kyin 1856 , dug/
zhag bcu tsam song ba
1857
dang/ ~ g a 'gro 'dod pa yin tel khyed
I858
kyi bla mas lung pa mes
bkang
I859
nas 'gro sa mi 'dug/ bla ma la thugs dam slod
I860
zer ba zhu grogsI86I gyis zer ba [B:
lal] Ian ci yang ma byas/
yang dmigs
I862
pa zhu ru phyin dus/ khyed kyi mi [B: de] da dung [B: yang] 'dug gam
gsungS/
I863
khong
I864
zer tshul zhus pas/ ngas thugs dam tsam cher
I865
byas pa med! da khong
I866
rang 'gro 'ong gsungs
I867
/ drung nas srung
I868
'khor bshig pas/ log phyin dus song nas mi 'dug/
dpe 1869 dkar bar chad 1870 la ' ongs 1871 par ' dug gsungs 1872/
brag dkar rta
I873
sor bzhugs dus kyang/ dpe
I874
dkar gyi gzugs dgon pa'i khong khebs
I875
pa gcig
byung nasi drung pa la mig ngan Ita yin 'dug/ thugs dam (66b) la bzhugs pas/ rang yalla (S319)
song /
1&51
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
11165
1866
1867
1868
1869
1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
lags sam compl. : abbr. laD saMB : abbr. lagsaM A.
rang A : rang bas B.
dmigscompl.: abbr. dmiDB: dmigA.
gsungscompl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
mi de da dung compl. : <mi> de da dung A : da rung mi de B.
kyinA: eingB.
beu tsam song baem.: abbr. beu tsaMsongpaA: abbr. beuig songbaB; cf. note 1840.
khyed A : khyodB.
Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'gengspa (td.) bkang ba, dgang ba, khong 1) rgyong ba'am gang bar byed
pa.
slod A : blodB.
grogs em. : abbr. roDB: grogA.
dmigscompl.: abbr. dmJDB: dmigA.
'duggamgsungscompl.: abbr. 'dugaMgs+yaB: abbr. 'dugaMgsungA.
khong A : kho B.
eher A : <eher {-}> B.
khong A : kho B.
'ong gsungscompl. : abbr. 'ong gs+yaB : yongs gsungA; cf. note 955.
srungem. : bsrung AB; cf Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v, srung 'khor-rdzas sngags dmigs nm sogs kyi
srung ba 'j 'khor 10.
dpe B : dpe' A.
ehadB: ehodA; cf. Jiischke 1881: bar, compo and deriv. barehod, -chad, perh. also -geod, sbsl. to bar
du geod pa - hinderance, impediment.
'ongs B : yong A.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
brag dkar rta B : bra dkar sta A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. brag dkar - brag d dkar po.
dpe B : dpe' A. According to Nebesky-Wojkowitz (1975: 96) there is evidence for the following
different spellings for Pe har, a 'Jig rten pa'i smng ma, so far: dPe kar, Pe dkar, sPe dkar, dPe dkar, Be
dkar, dPe ha ra and Pe ha ra.
khebs em. : kheb A : khengs B; cf Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. khebs pa (tmd.) khyab pa. Illuminator,
S.V. khebs 1. <verb> Part ofi) v.i. khebs pa and ii) V.l. 'gebs pa q.v.
150
Chapter 5
[2.11.10]
yang
1876
bul rong du bzhugs dUS
I877
slob dpon nam mkha' dpal bas zhu yig phul nas rnnga' m
1878
pa'i rnnga' bdag de grongs
1879
sam zhes sgrogs kyin gda' lags
1880
past thugs dam la' dogs
1881
par
zhu zhus past de'i
1882
nub drnigs
1883
nas gsang , dus kyi bsgrub
1884
rnchod gcig rndZadi nam langs
pa dang / rnnga' bdag pa gnas po cher
885
skyel rna la byon pa'i cha ji Ita ba bzhin/ sku
rndun du byung bas
1887
drung nas yengs rna ngang lal (28b) khyed grongs 'dug zer ba e bden
gsungs past dbu gug
1888
pa gsum rndzad
1889
nas gzhugs khri
1890
la thim song gsungs/
[2.11.11]
yang chos rje jiia 1891 na ba grongs
l892
dus kyang / bla rna jii3. 1893 na ba de rndang nub
1894
, byon
byung ste
1895
/ sku gshegs pa 'dra gsungs
1896
/ dus tshod sgrig1897 pas de'i nub dang 'grig par
byung/
1876
1877
1878
1879
1880
1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889
1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1895
1896
1897
yang A : om. B,
bzhugs dus compl. : abbr. bzhuD dus B : om. A.
zhuyigphulnasmnga'risem.: abbr.: zhuigphulnas mnga'dgA: zhuyigphul basmnga'dsB.
grongs B : grong A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'grongs pa (tmd.) grongs pa, 'grongs pa - 'chi ba.
grogs kyin gda' lags em. : abbr. sgroD kyi bda' laD B : sgrog kyin bda' lag A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen
mo, S.Y. sgrog pa (td.) 1. bsgrags pa, bsgrag pa, sgrogs -khyab par shod pa. lliuminator, s.y. sgrog pa
- to broadcast, publish.
'dogs compl. : abbr. 'doD B : 'dog A; cf. lliuminator, s.y. 'dogs pa, thugs la 'dogs pa - to fix in the
mind.
de'iB: deA.
dmigscompl.: <dmigs>B: dmigA.
bsgrub A : sgrob B.
po eherB :po'i ehe'i A; cf. Iiischke 1881: gnas-comp. and deriy. gnaspo-host, landlord, master of
a house, head of a family. Goldstein 2001, s.y. gnas po: innkeeper.
C SCD, s.y. eha lugs- appearance, clothing, costume.
basB :pasA.
gugem.: khugAB; c Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.y. gugpa(tmd.) 'khyogspa'am thurdu dudpa.
mdzadB : mdzad {nas} A.
bzhugs khdB : gzhugs khd A; c Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. bzhugs khri.
jnyA ern. : jnya AB.
grongs B : grong A.
jnyAem. :jnyaAB.
mdang nub em. : 'dang sang A: 'dang B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. mdang nub - snganub
mtshan mo. Goldstein 2001, s.y. mdang nub - sm. mdang dgong.
steB: teA.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
sgrig em. : bsgdg A : sgdD B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. sgrig pa - (td.) bsgrigs pa, bsgdg pa,
sgrigs 1) gshom pa.
Text Edition 151
[2.11.12]
snyung gzbi1898 drag po gcig byung dus thugs dam Ia bzhugs
1899
kyang snyung zug ches pas sku
spar spar 'phar
l900
bit dang I rngull.901 chu
1902
ltar 'brub
l903
pa byung dusl
. gang gis rten cing 'breI pa
1904
'byung I
'gag pa rned pa skyed rned pal
chad pa rned pa rtag rned pal
'ong
l905
ba rned pa 'gro rned pal
tha dad don min don gcig mini
spros pa nyer zbi zbi bstan
1906
pal
rdzogs pa'i sangs rgyas smra rnams kyi/
dam pa de Ia 'phyag 'tshaliol I
ihes pa Ian gsum bton
1901
pas snyung ba sangs
1908
pa byung I
[2.11.13]
bla rna Sgrub
1909
pa dpal bas zhabs tog rndzad dusl rtug pa thur gshegs
1910
pas dus 'phyisI911 tel
rna sieb pas gdan
1912
yol bar 'dug dgongsj1913 khong pa rang gis
1914
bshos g.yosl915 cing I yod pa
Ii! bla mas phebs kyang nang du 'gro rna nus par sgo gseng nas gzigs pasl bshos dlaugs (S320)
1898
1899
1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
.1915
gzhi em. : shi A: om. B; cf. Tshig mdzod 9hen mo, s.y. snyung gzhi - nad gzhi
bzhugscompl.: abbr. bzhuDB: bzhugA.
sparspar 'phar ba A: phar 'pharB; cf. SeD, s.y. spar ba-to raise, to increase; Goldstein 2001, S.Y.
'phar ba - 1. to increase, rise.
mgulB : rgyu A.
chuA: chuchuB.
'brubB: 'grugA; cf. SeD, S.Y. 'brubpa-with chu:to oyerflow.
pa em. : par AB; cf. KIu sgrub, dEu ma rtsa ba 'i tshig 1e 'ur byas pa shes rab ces bya ba, Sde-dge no.
3824, mdo 'grel, tsa la: pa.
'ong B : "ongs A; cf. ibid, Sde-dge: la.
bstsn em. : ston AB; ibid, Sde-dge la; Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. ston pa 1. (td.) bstsn pa, bstan pa,
ston.
bton em. : ston A : abbr. gs+ya B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. 'don pa 1. (td.) bton pa, gdon pa,
thon 2) kha ton bye pa.
snyung ba sangs em. : snyung sang A : snyung ba sangs dangs B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. sang
ba - sangs pa 'i 'bri srol gzhan zhig. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. sangs pa (tmd.) 1) 'dag pa; Goldstein
2001, S.Y. sangs 1. yi. to be free from, to recoyer from, to get cleared up/cured.
sgrub B : bsgrub A.
thurgshegscompl.: abbr. thurgsheDB: thugbshegA.
dus 'phyisem.: dusphyisB: 'phyisA.
maslebpas gdan B : gdanA; cf. Goldstein 2001, S.Y. gdan 'da:n- inYiting; gdan 'dzoms-to meet to
gather. SeD, S.Y. yol ba - II. yb. haye past, be done; Goldstein 2001, S.Y. yol- 1. yi. to pass/elapse
(for time).
dgongs A : dgongs nas B.
gisB :giA.
bshos g.yosA : g.yosg.yoDB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. bshos2. zas kyi zhe sa; Jaschke 1881:
bshosresp. for zan or spags- food, Yictuals; Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. g.yo ba 1. (td.) g.yos pa, g.yo
ba, g.yos 1) sbru ba dang 'tshod pa dang sbyor ba.
152
Chapter 5
te
l916
sku mdun du bog ste
l917
1 chos thamscad ming tsam brda,1918 (67a) tsam tha snyad tsam
btags
l919
pa tsam
l920
moll
gsungs nasi bshos phru'i
l921
nang nas ka gsol kyin
l922
'dug pas khong shin tu dad par gyur toll
[2.11.14]
sa skyar mang ja gcig 1a dung rna byung bar
l923
byon tel 'tshod
l924
thab kyi 'gram du bzhugs
l925
nasi khron
l926
chu 1a spyan ha re gzigs tel spyan chab na re re
l927
'dugl ja gsol (29a) rgyags
l928
kyang ma chad! nang du log byon [B: dus] kyang ma chad [B: par] phebs pa dang I spre bo thar
bzang
l929
gis khyed kyi slob dpon de za yin kyang
l930
ngu/ 'gro yin kyang
l931
ngu ba ci yin zer
bas
l932
1 bdag gi snang ba la nya sram gyis za ba gzigs nas spyan chab byung ba yin nam snyam
ste
l933
ci lags zhus pasl de yang ma yin! khron
l934
chu khro 10 10 ' gro yin 'dug pa
l935
de la/ rten
cing 'breI bar 'byung ba yan lag bcu gnyis gcig brtags nas bsgoms pas
l936
1 stong pa nyid kyi Ita
ba mal ma gcig skyes byung I stong nyid snying rje'i snying po can du ' dug pas mchi ma byung
ba yin gsungs
l937
1
1916
1917
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1921
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
dkrugs fe em. : dkrug sfe A : abbr. bskruD nas B; cf. Jiischke 1881: dkrug pa, pf. dkrugs; 1. to stir (up).
bog sfe em. : phog pa te A : phog te B; cf. Illuminator, s.y. bog pa,' past of 'bog pa TIL Yb. Y.i. 2) For
things like fruit and flows ''to fall/drop to the ground (etc.)."
brda' AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.y. brda'-brda dang 'dra.
bfagscompl.: btaDB: btagA.
fsamcompl.: abbr. tsaMB: abbr. tsaMsA.
gsungs nas bshos phru'i em. : gsung nas gshos phru'i A: gsung nas gshos ldm1'iB; cf. Tshig mdzod
chen rna; s.y.phru ba -rdza snod Goldstein 2001, s.Y. phru ba-sm. phru suod Goldstein 2001, s.Y.
phru snod - clay pot.
kyin A : kyiB.
byung bar B: {byung} <byung> parA.
'tshod em. : btso B : grtso A (sic); cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.y. 'tshod pa (td.) btsos pa, btso ba,
tshos; cf. Jiischke 1881: thab, 1. resp. gsol thah - fire-place, hearth.
bzhugscompl.: abbr. bzhuDB: bzhugA.
khron em. : abbr. khroM A : grom B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. khron pa - chu 'i ched du bros pa 'j
sa dong, ... khron chu.
rereem.: ramAB; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.y. rere byasnas-one by one.
rgyagscompl. : abbr. rgyaDB : rgyagA; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.Y.ja2. tea; ya. - rgyag-to put leayes
in water for brewing.
bzang B : bzangs A.
yin kyangem. : abbr. 4n kyang A : yin yang B.
kyang A: yang B.
bas A : bda 'B.
steB: deA.
khron em. : abbr. khroM A : grom B.
khro 10 10 'gro yin 'dug pa em. : khro khro 10 'gIo yin 'dug pa A : khro 10 10 'gIo ba B; cf. Tsbig
mdzod chen mo, s.y. khro 10 10 - sgra 'ikhyad par zhig.
rten cing 'brei bar 'byung ba yan lag bcu gnyis gcig brtags nas bsgoms pas em. : abbr. rtrai1 yan laD
bcUJs I rtagnas bsgoMpasA: abbr. rten cing 'bre1par 'byungba 1 sgoMspa{-) B.
gsungs campI. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
Text Edition
153
[2.11.15]
shangs su chos bar la byon [B: pa'i] dus [B: su] drung pa la chibs
1938
gcig yod pas bshol
1939
nas
byon/ grwa pa rnams
1940
sngon la byon
1941
nas rab la rgall drung pas
1942
rta gang' gro ba
1943
btang
nasi 'khor rno zab mo gcig la' chud 'dug pa lal grwa
l944
pa mams kyis rgyug1945 k:u co byas
kyang I rta thad ka la btang bas
1946
chu la thug kha tsam man chad
1947
nub pa byung rung! rta
. btang
1948
kyang ma shor bar
1949
'dugl de 'dra'i mdzad lugs
1950
zhus pasl rta kho rkang lag [B:
bzhi] btsugs
1951
pa gcig mi 'gyel bar 'dug gsungs
1952
1 (29a5, 67a6) gzhati yang chos bar la gshegs
dusl sa chayangs pamams [B: su] thugs damla yengs nasi zhal gang tshur
1953
tshugs su gshegs
tel spyan 'dren du (S321) 'gro dgos mang dU
1954
byung zerl mnga' ris nasi chos rje grags pa'i
phyag phyi mdzad de gtsang
1955
po la byon
1956
dus (67b) kyang! thugs dam la 'byams nasi
chibs 1957 pas yang yang bskyur19581 zhabs tog
1959
bya dgos mang du byung bas
1960
I rta rdzi na rei
slob dpon gzhon blo ba'i
1961
mi dgos pa'i sgom 'disl nga sdug rus bzod
1962
pa 'dug [B: ces] zerl
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
19S5
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
chibs em. : phyibs AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. 'chib pa (td.) bcibs pa, bcib pa, chibs -zhon
pa 'i zhe sa. Jiischke 1881: chibs (pa) resp. horse, riding-horse, saddle-horse, chibs la 'chib pa (for Ita
lazhonpa).
pas bshol em. : pa bshol A : pas shulB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. bshol ba (td.) bshol ba, bshol
ba, sholl) phyir 'gyangs dang skyur ba, ... nyin gsum bshol ba. .
grwa pa mams em. : abbr. gra pa maMs A : gra pa mams kyiB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. gzwa
pa-dge'dunpaspyi'iming.
byon A : phyin B.
pas B : gaas A.
baA: laB.
grwa em. : gra AB.
mams kyis rgyug compl. : abbr. maMs kyi<s> rgyug A : abbr. maMs+yi rgyuD B; cf. Tshig mdzod
chen mo, S.Y. rgyug pa 1. (td.) brgyugs pa, brgyug pa, rgyugs - 'gros mgyogs por gtong ba. Goldstein
2001, S.Y. Itargyug-horse racing.
basB :pasA.
thug kha tsam man chad em. : thugs kha tsam man chad A : abbr. th+ya ka mar bcadB.
Ita btang em. : Ita stang A : Ita stangs B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. gtong ba 1) (td.) btang ba,
gtang ba, thong.
barB: baA.
Cf. llluminator, s.Y.lugs, byed lugs- techniques that haye been worked out and established for doing
something.
btsugs em. : gtsug A : abbr. ItsuD B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'dzugs pa (td.) btsugs pa, gzugs
pa, tshugs2) 'jogpa.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
tshur A : om. B.
mang du A : <mang dll> B.
gtsang B : rtsang A.
byon B : gshegs A.
chibsem. :phyibsB: ('}phyibA.
bskyur A : skyur B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. skyur ba 1. (td.) bskyur ba, bskyur ba, skyur2)
phar dbjug pa 'am g.yug pa.
tog B : thog A.
basB :pasA.
blo ba'iB : blo 'i A.
ngasdugrus bzodem.: ngasdugrirgsodB: sdugrirbsodA; Goldstein 2001, s.y. sdugrus-enduring
or tolerating hardship/ suffering! misery; ya - byed; -rgyag; to endure! tolerate/ bear hardship or
suffering or misery.
154 Chapter 5
(29b) shel dkar gyi 'du khang du gzims shing
1963
/ spyi khang gi steng
l964
na gdan gsoi ba
mdzad
1965
kyin yod pa Ial nyin gcig bdag gis sangs rgyas kyi dus mchod gcig zhus dus/ mi drug
bdun gcig spyi khang na yod pas/ rna mthong bar
1966
drung pa steng na phebs 'dug/ khang pa
dog mo 'dir'u [cag] reg pas
1967
rna mthong bar
1968
drung pa
1969
phebs pas
1970
rdzu 'phruI
1971
yin
nam zhes ngo mtshar du gyur/
[2.11.16]
drung nas dbus la byon pa'i dus sui chos rje [B: pal dpon slob sum brgya tsam gyis ser
phreng
l972
gis bsus/ chos rje pas
1973
phyag phul ba la phyag Ian mdzad bzhed pa la
1974
/ mi mdzad
par zhu zhus pas
l975
/ de man chad
1976
phyag Ian rna mdzad pas/ dbus pa'i dge bshes chen po
mams kyang / phyag Ian mdzad pa'i spro ba dang bra! bar gyur kyang /1977 drung nas
1978
gsang
sde'i
l979
mkhan pol stag lung 10 tstsha ba
1980
sogs la
1981
phyag phar mdzad pas/ jo b0
1982
bzang
ba'i
1983
grags pa yang cher thob pOI984//
[2.11.17]
de nas dga' ba gdong du chos rje blo bzang grags pas
1985
gtso mdzadl bka' bcu pa nam mkha'
byang chad bsod she dar mal bka' brgyad pa ' ga' yar1986 dang/ phar tshad mkhyen pa lnga brgya
tsam Ia dbu rna 'jug pa dang/ Ita khrid gsungs
1987
pas/ me tog gi char babs thams cad shin tu gus
(8322) par gyur toll
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1918
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
gzims shing B : abbr. gzim+s pa mdzad A.
stengA: stengsB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. steng-sgang ngam thog.
ba mdzad campI. : <ba mdzad> A : pa mdzadB.
barB : parA.
'u cag reg pas em. : 'u regs pas A : abbr.: 'u rage bas B; cf. SCD, s.v. reg pa 2. to touch. In W. very
common under the fonn rag-ceo 3. to feel, to perceive; esp. in W. where it sounds: rag-ceo
barB : parA.
paB :pasA.
pasB :paA.
rdzu 'phmfB: abbr. rdzufA.
gyis ser phreng B : gyi ser 'phreng A.
pasB: basA.
faA: om.B.
pasB: nasA.
man chad em. : mar chad AB.
phyag fan mdzad pa 'i spra ba dang braf bar gyur kyang A : <phyag fan zhu ba 'i spros pa dang braf bar
gyur kyang> B.
nas B : gnas A.
sde'iA: ste'iB.
baA: am. B. See note 528.
fa B : abbr. pa <fa> A.
jo bocompl.: abbr.jauAB.
bzangba'icompl.: abbr. bzang'jB: bzangpa'iA.
poB: boA.
grogs pas A: bas'B. Note that in ms. A the suffix -sin the ligature pas is marked by dots,
Cf. note 1700.
gsungs campI. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
Text Edition
155
[2.11.18]
de dus gsang phu ba Idan rna dkon seng langs
1988
tel chos rje yab sras gnyis la zhu ba re yod pasl
gsan du gsoll gtsang
l989
na mkhas pa red mda' ba
1990
1 dbus na mkhas pa blo bzang [B: pal zer
nasi khyed yab sras gnyis [B: ding sang] dbus gtsang
1991
gi bstan pa'i bdag (68,) por grags brda'
bas
1992
1 da [B: Ita] zhal 'dzorns dus 'dirl theg
1993
pa gsum grub mtha' bzhi'i bshad srol
1994
(30.)
mdzad pa mams !kog tu mi mdzad pari bdag cag dbus gtsang
1995
gi don gnyer ba mams kyi log
rtog
l996
dang the tshom bsal
1997
ba'i phyirl tshogs su 'be1
1998
gtam mdzad par zhu ba dangl lung
rigs kyi dgag Sgrub
l999
mdzad nasi kho thag chod pa'i chos 'khor yun ring du bskor du gsolfOOO
de nas rje btsun chen po yang gangs bu Ie dani
oo1
I chos rje blo bzang grags
2002
pa yang '0 de
gung rgyal gyi gangs la mi gshegs par
OO3
dbus gtsani
oo4
gi gzhung du bstan pa'i bya ba
2005
rgya
chen po mdzad du gsol/ zhes
2006
zhus soil
de dus drung nas
2007
dge 'dun mams la mang ja dar 'gyed dani
oo8
bcas pa mdzad doll
de nas sne'ur byon dus yab sras
2009
gnyis kyis
2010
gtso mdzadl dge bshes bzang la rags
2011
pa
bdun bcu tsam gyis
2012
tsha gral du
2013
gsang phu ba'i2014 dge bshes gcig langs nasi khyed yab
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
200)
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
20ll
2012
2013
2014
gsang phu ba ldan ma dkon seng langs B : abbr. gsang phu ba ldan ma kun seng lang+s A.
gtsang B : rtsang A.
mda' baem.: mda'pa A : 'da'paB.
gtsang B : dsang A.
brda' bas A: bda' basB; cf Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. brda' - brda dang 'dra; Goldstein 2001, s.v.
brda 2. communicating.
'dzoms dus 'dir thegcompI. : abbr. 'dzoM dus 'dir theg B: 'dzom dus 'dir thegs A.
srolA: raiB.
gtsang B : rtsang A.
rtogA: abbr. rtoDB; cf Tshigmdzod chen mo, s.v.log rtog.
the tshom bsal campI. : abbr. theoM bsaiB : the tshoms gsal A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. the
tshombsal
'bel A: 'brelB.
mdzad par zhu ba dang lung dgs kyi dgag sgrub em. : mdzad par zhu ba dang lung dg kyi dgag bsgrub
A : dang lung ngs kyi dgag sgrub B.
bskor du gsol A : skor bar zhu ba dang B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. skor ba 1. (td.) bskor ba,
bskor ba, skoT.
de nas Ije btsun chen po yang gangs bu Ie dang A : abbr. de nas yang Ije btsun chene yang bu Ie 'i
gangs la gsheD mi gs+ya zhing B.
g.rags em. : {grogs} A : am. B.
mi gshegs par campI. : abbr. mi gsheDr B : abbr. gsh+yes mi gsung bar A.
gtsang B : rtsang A.
bstan pa 'i bya ba A : bstan pa dang po naM gyi don B.
zhes em. : ces A : am. B.
nasB: (g}nasA.
'gyed dang A : abbr. 'gyedang B.
yab sras B : yab {-} <sras> A.
kyisB: kyiA.
bzang la rags campI. : abbr. bzang la raD B : b<za>ng la rag A.
gyisB: gyiA.
tsha g.ral du A : abbr. tsha g.raisu B. See also note 2157.
phu ba 'i campI. : phu 'iB : bu ba 'i A.
156
Chapter 5
sras gnyis la zhu ba tshiio
15
re yod pasl mi ' ehab par gsoni
0l6
por gsung barO
l7
zhul bla rna rje
bstun pa'i zhal gsuni0
18
nasi spyir bka' bstan beos kyi dgongs pa gzhung lugs rngo rnjug gi
2019
, gangs
2020
go ba re dgos pa yin! tshig gi phreng ba re ltas te
2021
I shes shes
2022
rang la nges pa
2023
tsam rned gsungs pa
2024
e bden zhus pasl ngas de ' dra rang byas su rna (3323) tshorl lar de ' dra
gcig 'dug pa gsungs pasl bla rna'i drunio25 nas don gyis
2026
zhal gyis bzhes par gda' bas
2027
/rni
'ehab par gsung ba
2028
thugs la btags
2029
zer/bla marin po ehe'i gsuni
03
0 nasi gzhung lugs kyi
'gangs gshoi0
31
nal nga'i blarna dgos
2
0
32
payin/ dka' gnad
2033
kyi tshig [B: gi] spuris 'byednal
a b0
2034
rgan chen dgos
2
0
35
pa yin gsungs pa
2036
(30b) e bden zhus pasl ehos rje pas
2037
zhal
, dzum
2038
rndzad (68b) nasi eang mi gsung ba
2039
la khong na rei yab sras gnyis kyang jo bo bzang
ngan rnehod rten
2040
gyi bang rim bzhin
2041
log ge 'dug zer roll
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
2028
2029
2030
2031
2032
2033
2034
2035
2036
2037
2038
2039
2040
2041
tshig A : om. B.
gsong B : srong A; cf. Goldstein 2001: gsong po: straightforward, honest, sincere.
barB: baA.
zhaf gsungem. : (zhaf) gsung A: abbr. gs+ya B; cf. Goldstein 2001: zhaf gsung- talk, conversation
(h). Note that in ms. A the ligature zhaJis on the top and at the bottom marked by dots.
mjug gi em. : abbr. )'ugiB : abbr. bzhugi A; cf. Jiischke 1881: mgo, mgo mjug.
'gangs em.: 'gang A : dgongs ba B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'gang - 'gangs dang 'dra; Tshig
mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'gangs - gnad dam gal Goldstein 2001, s.v. 'gangs - importance, value. Gold-
stein 200 I, s.v. gnad - the key or main point Isignificance, the importance, the essence. Tashi Tsering
understands: colloquial steng- on.
/tas te em. : re ftas ste A : te tes B.
shes shes A : ne nes B.
ngespaB: snyingpoA.
gsungs pa em. : <gsung pa> A : gsung ba B.
drung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
gyis A : gyiB.
gda'A: bda'B; cf. Jiischke 1881: gda' ba- eleg. for 'dugpa.
gsung ba compl. : abbr. gs+ya ba B : gsungs pa A.
thugs 1a btags compl. : abbr. th+ya fa btaDB : thug fa btag A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. thugs fa
'dogs pa - sems fa 'jog pa.
gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
gshog A: bshogB; cf. Goldstein 2001: bshog-sm. gshogl. va. to cut through, to split, to cleave.
dgosB: dgo{ng)sA.
gnadem. : gnasA: ba'i gnasB; cf. Tshigmdzod chen mo, s.v. dka' gnad - dka' sa'i gnad 'gag.
boA:poB.
dgosB: (dgo-) <dgos>A.
gSlWgS pa A : gsung ba B.
pasB :paA.
om. B : {pa} A.
gsung ba compl. : abbr. gs+ya ba B : gsung pa A.
mchod Iten compl. : abbr. mch+toen B : abbr. mchoen A.
bzhincompl.: abbr. 4nA: /tarB.
Text Edition 157
[2.11.19]
yang sne 'u'i tsha
2042
gral gcig tu
2043
slob dpon gnya1
2044
pa zer ba gsang phu gling stod
2045
kyi
gdan sa
2046
byed rgyu grwa
2047
pa brgya tsam yod pa gcig gisl zhabs dbang gnang bai
48
zhu
zhus pasl khyed 'dra ba'j dge bshes chen po la de 'dra gar 'oni0
49
gsung nas ma gnang basfo
50
nga yang tshe mjui0
51
'dir dpalldan red mda' ba'j2052 zhabs kyi padmo dri ma med pa la
gtugs
2053
zer ba gcig 'dod pa yinlbtsun rgan [B: rang] 'jigs mi dgos rkang pa zhoio
54
zhus pasl
'0 na g.ya' gsungs
2055
nas zhabs dbang mdzad doll
[2.11.20]
de nas ilia sar byon nasi dge ' dun brgyad brgyal mi nag pa drug brgyaZ
56
tsam la skyid sdug lam
khyer gcig gsungsl de dus chos rje blo bzang grags
2057
pas jo bo'i drung du mchod pa rgya chen
po bshams te
2058
1 bla majo bo'i drung du bzhugs te
2059
1 smon lam [B: gyi mthun 'gyur] mdzad
du gsol zhus nasi khong pa rang gis gtso mdzad dge ' dun lnga brgya tsam gyis yan lag bdun pa
rgyas pa gcig phull gtso bor0
60
bzang po spyod pa'i smon lam
2061
dang I khong pa rang gis (8324)
mdzad pa'i bde ba can gyi smon lam [B: sogs] rgya cher btabl khyad par dU
2062
rje btsun thams
cad mkhyen pa ku mii
2063
ra rna tis
2064
gtso mdzad bstan pa'i rtsa lai
o65
skyes chen [B: dam pal
zhal bzhugs pa
2066
thams cad bstan pa dang sems can gyi don du zhabs brtan par gyur cigf
067
ces
pa Ian gsum mdzad doll
2042
2043
2044
2045
2046
2047
2048
2049
2050
2051
2052
205)
2054
2055
2056
2057
2058
2059
2060
2061
2062
2063
2064
2065
2066
2067
See note 2157.
taA: duB.
gnyaJB: snyalA. Name ofa place cf. Kaschewsky (1971: 268nI29).
phu gJing stod em. : phu gJing bstod A : phu 'i gJing stodB.
gdan sa A : gdan <sa> B.
grwaem. :graAB.
gnangbarem.: gnangpaA: snangbarB.
'ong B : <yongs> A; cf. note 955. Illuminator, s.v. gar III. <pronoun> [Old] used to mean gang before
the language revisions. E.g. in garcig q.v., and garyangmeaning gang yang and others.
basB :pasA.
mjugem.: bzhugAB.
mda' ba'iem.: mda'pa'iA: 'da'pa'iB.
gtags em. : abbr. gtsuD B : gtag A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. gtag pa (td.) gtags pa, gtag pa,
gtags 1) reg pa.
zhog B : bzhog A; cf. Jiischke 1881: Jog pa I. pf. bzhag, ft. gzhag, imp. zhog 1. to put, to place.
gsungs campI. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
brgya em. : rgya A : gya B.
grags A : am. B. Note that in ms. A the ligature grags is not marked with dots, but with a continous
line.
bshams te campI. : abbr. bshaMs te B : abbr. bshaM ste A.
teB: steA.
gtso borcompl. : abbr. gtsaur B : abbr. gtsau A.
smon Jam campI. : abbr. smonM A : smon B ..
khyad par du campI. : abbr. khyar du B : khyad du<r> A.
mA em. : ma AB.
tis B : tj<s> A.
bstan pa 'j rtsa Jag: campI. : abbr. bstan 'i rtsa lag B : <bstan> pa 'i rtsa {-} Jag A.
paB: om. A.
gyur cig A : abbr. gyuig B.
158 Chapter 5
[2.11.21]
de dus drung nas
2068
zhabs dbang du zhu zhU
2069
la gnang I chos rjes pas ye rna gnang bas
20
-:1
(3Ja) gsang phu ba'i grwa
2071
pamarns narel red rnda' bakhoni
o72
'chi bas mi 'jigs pas
2073
zhabs
dbang du zhu zhu
2074
1a gnang gin
2075
'dugl bl0 bzang pa
2076
'chi bas 'jigs pas
2077
su la yang mi
gnang ba
2078
'dug zer ba'ani
o79
byung I
[2.11.22]
de nas rwa
2080
sgreng (69a) la 'byon dus brag dkar rno pal bya yul rin po chel 10 mkhan pol 'bri
khung pa'i stag rtse rdzoni
o81
pa mams kyis
2082
'bul nod
2083
phun sum tshogs pa rndzadl de nas
stag rtse phu la byon pasl dge 'dun sum brgya rtsam gyi gdan
2084
chad nasi kun bsod snyorns la
byon pasl gdan theb
2085
tsarn byung I
[2.11.23]
de nas 10 pa'i tshogs pa chos 'breI zhur byung stel tsam pa rndzo rgyab nyi shu lliag tsarn phul
basi slar mi theg pa'i sdug bsngal du gyurl chos rje yab sras narn mkha' rnclZod la nmga' bmyes
pa ' dra zer ba'i grags pa byung I
2068
2069
2070
2071
2072
2073
2074
2075
2076
2077
2078
2079
2080
2081
2082
2083
2084
2085
nasB: (-}nasA.
du zhu zhu em. : su zhu zhu B : su zhu A.
basB :pasA.
gnva em. : gra AB.
mda' bakhongem.: mda'pakhoA: 'da'pakhongB; khong()1) ofkho.
pasB : pa'iA.
du zhu zhu em. : su zhu zhu B : su zhu A.
ginA :giB.
paB: om. A.
pasA: nasB.
ba em. : pa A : om. B.
ba'angem.: bayangA: ba'a(sic) B.
rwaA: raB.
rdzongem. : rdzongs AB.
kyisA :kyiB
nodB : snod A. Note that this term occurs several times in this text. In one place below Shes bya 'i gter
mdzod317.34 replaces 'buJ nod with 'buJ nor.
Cf. gdanpp. 151, 154,243,245.
pas gdan theb A : pa dang gdan thebs B.
Text Edition
159
[2.11.24]
de nas rwa sgreng du phyag phebsl dngu1 gdugs can che chimg I gsang 'dus 'jam rdor gyis
2086
gtso mdzad rten gsUm ngo mtshar can
2087
mams la phyag dang mchod pa rgya cherr0
88
phul nasi
dgon pa gong du yab sras gnyis sku mtshams
2089
bead pa'i but0
90
sgo nasi gzhi byes kyi tshogs
pa drug brgya tsam la
2091
skal ba dang 'tsham
2092
pa'i chos kyi 'khor 10 bskor2
93
tshul nil bdag
nyid chen posl [B: nyams len byin dabs kyi khrid/] gsang , dus rim (S325) lnga/2094 zab mo lta ba'i
khrid/2095 [B: bdag med gnyis sgom tshul rgya chen spyod pa'i khrid/] thet096 pa chen po blo
sbyong [B: dang] bzhi brgyapa'i bshad pa [B: mams gnang]/ sku mtshams
2097
grol nasi rigs pa
drug CU
2098
pa'i bshad pargyas
2099
pa gcig gnang nasi grol dUS
2100
kho bo klu sgrub yab sras (3ib)
kyi dgongs
2101
pa 'chad
2102
na de Ita bur 'chad pa yin
2103
1 mi re re'i rtog pa dang bstun nas
2104
1
gzhung lugs 'chad pa kun mkhyerr
105
gyis kyang dka' gsungs
2106
1
2086
2087
2088
2089
2090
2091
2092
2093
2094
2095
2096
2097
2098
2099
2100
2101
2102
2103
2104
2105
2106
lhag tsam phul bas, slar mi theg pa 'i sdug bsngal du gyur, chos Ije yab sras nam mkha' mdzod la
mnga' bmyes pa 'dra zer ba 'i grags pa byung, de nas rwa sgreng du phyag phebs, dngul gdugs can che
chung, gsang 'dus jam rdor gyis em. : abbr. lhag!sam phul bas, slar mi theg pa'i sdug bsngal du gyur,
choes yab sras nalvlkha' mdzod la mnga' bmyes pa 'dra zer'i graD pa byung, de nas ra sgreng du
phyaD phebs, dnguJ gdugs can che chung gsang 'dus jam rdor gyis B : abbr. ! <lhag pa tsaM 1 phul
pas, slar mi theg pa 'i sdul du gyur, choes yab sras namkha' mdzod la mnga' mnyes pa 'dra zer ba 'i
grags pa byung, de nas rwa sgrang du phyag+s pheb, dngul gdugs can che chung, gsang sdus jaM rdor
gyi> A (in ms. A69a2 a snake stroke marks the place of insertion of this extra line which is given
above the first line, cf. notes 379, 1010).
can A : baB.
chen A : cher B.
mtshamsem. : abbr. mtshaM A: abbr. 'tshaMsB.
bugB : bu A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. bugsgo - bug pa'i sgo. Goldstein 2001, S.v. bug sgo-
door to a cave.
tsam la compI. : abbr. tsaM la B : abbr. tsaMs <la>A.
Cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. 'Isham pa 2. (td.) 'tshams pa, 'tsham pa - ran pa'am mthun pa.
bskor A : skor B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. chos kyi 'khor 10 bskor ba - sangs rgyas kyis chos
gsungspa.
gsang 'dus rim lnga B : gsang 'dus rim Jnga 'i khrid A.
zab mo lta ba 'i khridB : dbu ma 'i rta khrid A.
theg B : thegs A.
sku mtshamsem. : abbr. sku mtshaM A: 'tshams B.
rigs pa drug cu em. : abbr.: rig pa crug B : rig pa mug bcu A.
rgyas B : brgyas A.
dus B : du<s> A.
dgongs B : d<g>ongs A.
'chadB : mchad A.
Ita bur 'chad pa yin campI. : Itar 'chad pa yin B : lta bu 'chad A.
bstun nas campI. : abbr. bstuns A: abbr. stuns B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. stun pa - (td.) bstun
pa, bstun pa, stun - gzhan la ltos pa dang, gzhan dang mthun par byed pa.
pa kun mkhyen compI. : abbr. pa kuen B : <pa kun> mkhyen A (insertion marked with a cross).
dka' gsungscompI.: abbr. dka' gs+yaB: bka' gsungA.
160 Chapter 5
[2.11.25]
chos rje pa 'bri khung du byon shull bka' bcu pa gnyis kyis
2107
gtso mdzadl gsang bde gURg
gsum rtse thang sogs kyi dge ba'i bshes gnyen yang dag pa bdun CU
2108
tsam la gsang , dus rgyud
, grel cha lag dang bcas pal dbu ma rgyan gyi bshad pa rgyas pa gcig gnang bas
2109
I ldan ma
dkon seng dang I nam mkha' gshog ral
2110
la sogs pa cung mi dad pamams kyang mi phyed pa'i
dad pa thob par gyur toll
[2.11.26]
denas yab sras gnyis stag lung gimdorzhal 'dzomg2111 dusl '01 ka stagrtse ba'ijomo chos 'breI
zhur 'ongs
2112
pa gcig lal chos smyo byung ba
2113
lal drung pa'i gsuni
114
nas dge (69b) 'dun gcig
rgyugs2115lajo mo ma gi'i lag pa g.yas pa 'og tu zhoi
116
lal khyed kyi lag pa g.yas pas steng
nas rgyob dang gsungs pa
2117
lal de bzhin byas pas jo mo smyo ba sangsl 'khor phal mo che'i
bsam pa lal ' di sde snod la mkhas pa min pari gegg2118 sel sogs mi mkhyen snyam pa yod
2119
pa
lal kun ngo mtshar che bar gyur toll .
de nas stag lung dU
2120
spyan drangs tel stag lung rin po ches na bza' clubs
2121
pal ja sig sogs 'bu1
nod
2122
rgya chen po mdzadl tshogs pas chog2123 zhusl stag lung pa kun gus par gyur toll
[2.11.27]
de nas (8326) gnam rtse ldeng gf124 gtsug lag khang du chos rje 10 tstsha ba skyabs mchog dpal
bzang po dang I chos rje yab sras gnyis kyis2125 gtso mdzad dbyar gnas khas blangs
2126
pa'i dge
2107
2108
2109
2IlO
2111
2HZ
2113
2114
2115
2116
2117
2118
2119
2120
2121
2122
2123
2124
2125
2126
kyis B : kyi<s> A.
cu em. : bcu AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. cu - Ijes 'jug yod pa 'i grangs ka 'i ming mthar bcu
zhes pa 'i tshab tu 'gro ba, ... bcu ... bcu ... sum cu, ... drug cu,. .. bdun cu, ... brgyad cu.
basB :pasA.
gshog ralB : gshog ral {-} A. Note that in IDS. A the deletion is additionally marked with dots.
gi mdor zhaJ 'dzoms em. : abbr. gi 'dor zhal 'dzoMB : abbr. mdor zhaJ 'dzoM A; cf. Nitartha, s.y.
mdor- joined; the lower part; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. zhaJ 'dzoms 1) phan tshun gdong 'phrad
pa.
'ongsB: yongsA; cf. note 955.
baB :paA.
pa 'i gsung A : abbr. gi gS+ya B.
rgyugscompl. : abbr. rgyuDB : rgyug A; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.y. rgyug, p. brgyugs, f. brgyug;imp.
rgyugs Ya. 1. to run, to race.
'ogtuzhogB: 'ogstubzhogA.
gsungs pa em. : gsung pa A : abbr. gs+ya ba B.
pargegscompl.: abbr.pargeg+sA: abbr. pa geDB.
snyam pa yod compl. : abbr. snyaM pa yodB : snyaMs <yod pa> pa A (sic).
lung du A : lungs su B.
chibsem. :phyibsAB.
nodB : mod A.
tshogs pas chos em. : abbr. tshog+s pas <tshogs> chos A : tshoD chos B. .
Itse ldeng gi B : {-} Itse <ldeng> gyi A; cf. Ye shes rgyal mtshan 894.14: gnam Itser ldeng,' Shes
bya 'i gter mdzod317 .17: gnam Itse Iding,' TBRC code W1956: gnam Itse Ideng.
kyis em. : kyi AB.
biangs B : blang A.
Text Edition
161
'dun lnga brgyal phyogs (32a) [kun] nas
2127
chos 'bre1la 'dus pa [B: mams] dang bcas pa brgyad
brgya tsam byung ba2l28 la chos kyi 'khor 10 bskor
129
tshu1nil bdag nyid chen pos gung chos
1a
2130
, dul bal dbu ma rtsa 'jug gnyisl gsang , dus kyid rgyudl Ita khrid mams gnang I gzhan yang
phyogs nas byonpamams la chos 'breI ci 'dod gnang
2131
1 de dus chos rje blo bzang g r a g ~ 1 3 2 pas
dbyar gnas rgyags gang byung gi dngos po drag pa rnams 'bul ba'i dam bca' mdzad nasi gser
srang re re'i
2133
ma1).9ala thengs gsum phull gzhan yang dngos po byung res bzhin gy'i
2134
spyan
drangs nasi khong pa rang gis 'bul ba 'bull smon lam ' debsl bsngo ba zhu ba sogs mdzad cing
I de'i
2135
gong du yang gser mgar
136
lugs dangl Ii sku'i 'jam dpal dbyangs zhal gnyis kyis
2137
gtso mdzad! gser dngul gos dar sogs 'bul nod
2138
rgya chen po mdzad cing I rjes su yang dngul
bre chen! na bza,2139 cha tshang thengs
2140
'ga' yar [B: dang]1 gsoljargyun nri 'chad par
141
phul
nasi rtag tu ngus (70a) chos 'phags bsten pa bzhin mdzad doll
[2.11.28]
dbyar gnas grol ba dang I gtsani
142
du byon nas
2143
sa skyar phyai144 phebs tel 'jam dbyangs
kyi drung duJ tahud
145
gyi snam sbyarbzang po gcig [B: dang]/blare gcig [B: phuI]1 tshogs pa
stong 'khor
146
brgyad brgya tsam la mang ja ' gyed dang bcas pa mdzadl
2127
2128
2129
2130
2131
2132
2133
2134
2135
2136
2137
2138
2139
2140
2141
2142
2143
2144
2145
2146
brgya, phyogs kun nas em. : <b>rgya, phyogs nas A : abbr. brgya, phyoD bell nas B. The addition bell
in ms. B does not make much sense here, because this would include beings from heaven and hell.
baB :paA.
bskorA: skorB.
laB: om.A.
gnang A : snang B.
grags A: am. B. Note that in ms. A the ligature gragsis marked with a continous line (c note 2057).
re re 'iB : abbr. re 'i A.
res bzhin gyi em. : abbr. res 4n gyis B : res kyi {---} A.
de'iA: deB.
mgarem. : gar AB.
'jam dpal dbyangs zhaJ gnyis kyis em. : abbr. 'jaMJ zhaJ 2 kyis A : abbr. 'jaM dbyangs zhal2 kyiB.
nodB : snod A.
bza'B :zaA.
thengs B : thang A.
mi 'chad par B : ma chad par A.
gtsangem.: rtsangAB.
byon nas campI. : byon <nas> A : abbr. byons B.
phyagA: abbr.phyaDB.
hunA: 'unB.
stong 'khorem.: stongbskorA: bstongskorB; cf. Jaschke 1881: stong I. thousand; stong 'khorlo-
a wheel with a thousand spokes; Usually 1800 = gcig stong brgyad bIYa.
162 Chapter 5
[2.11.29]
de nas bill rong du
2147
sku mtshams dam po 1a 10 gslllli
148
bzhugs dus bu Ie rgyun du gtor ma len
du yong gin2149 yod pal nyin gcig (8327) Sgrub
2150
chung mas kyang mthong nasi rgod pas ci 'dug
gsungs
2151
1 kho bu Ie gtor ma len du 'ong gi gda' zhUS
2152
zerl
[2.11.30]
dang po dmu rdzini
153
du chos bar mdzad dus nam (32b) langs pa dang I gzhi bdag mo khyung
lung ma sku mdun na
2154
yar rdol nasi rgyan [B: dang] cha lugs bsam gyigZ155 mi khyab pa dang
ldan pa phyag 'tshall byin rlabs
2156
zhus nas sa la thim song I snga dro tsha dus SU
2157
I gzhi bdag
mo'i gzugs gyani
158
ngos la bris pa gcig gzigs nas
2159
1 mo 'di 'dra ba
2160
gcig mi 'dug! 'di bas
brgya2
161
'gyur gyis mdzes pa gcig 'dug gsunggZ
l62
1 de'i
2163
dus bud med gcig la gzhi bdag rno
babs
2164
nasi sngon gyi dge slong de tsho phebs
2165
pasl zhabs tog yang dag pa phul zer nagZ
166
1
sngon gyi dge slong ni byang s e ~ 1 6 7 zla ba rgyal mtshan
2168
J
[2.11.311
de dus mkhan chen dpal 'byorl slob dpon dar ma sogs lnga la mdzod kyi rang' grel gyi steng nas
mdzub khrid mdzad pas
2169
lnga kas mdzod dga' mo shes pa re byung I 'di 'dra ba'i2170 mchad
2171
nyan brod
2172
po yin zhes mnyes tshor chen po mdzad doll
2147
2148
2149
2150
2151
2152
2153
2154
2155
2156
2157
2158
2159
2160
2161
2162
2163
2164
2165
2166
2167
2168
2169
2170
2171
2112
duB: tuA.
sku mtshams dam po 1a 10 gsum em. : abbr. sku mtshaM dam po 1a 10 3 A : abbr. sku 'tshaMs 1a 10 3
daMpoB.
yang gin A: 'ong giB.
sgrub B: bsgrub A.
gSUllgscompi. : abbr. gs+ya B : gSUllg A.
'ong gi gda' zhus em. : yang gi gda' zhus A: 'ongs bda 'B; cf. note 2027.
dmu rdzingem. : nnu rdzing B : smu rdzings A; cf. note 1779.
naA :paB.
gyis B : gyi A.
byin r1abs campI. : abbr. byin+1abs B : byin brlabs A; cf. note 71.
tsha dus su A : tsha dus B.
gyangem. : gyeng AB; cf. A': gyang.
nasA :pasB.
baA: am. B.
brgya B : rgya A.
'dug gSUllgs campI. : abbr. 'dUgSUllgS A : abbr. 'dug gs+ya B.
de'iA: deB; cf. Illuminator, s.v. dedusabbr. of de'i dus.
babsB: {-}babsA.
phebs B : pheb A.
zernasA: zerB.
byangsemscompI.: abbr. byangsesMB: abbr. byengMsA.
zla ba rgyal mtshan campI. : abbr. zla ba rgyan[tsa rtags] A : abbr.: zla rgyalo B.
rang 'grel gyi steng nas mdzub khrid mdzas pas /nga em. : <rang> 'gre1 gyi steng nas 'dzug4khrid
(sic) mdzad pas A : rang 'gre1 gyi stengs nas 'dzub khrid mdzad pa {-} B.
'di 'dra ba'iA: 'di'dra'iB.
'chadB : mchad A.
brad A : drodB.
Text Edition 163
ngam ringS
2173
rtse mor blo bzang [B: ba] sogs dpon slob bcu drug gis chos bar mdzad dusl
ng
am
rings2174 shod na mkhan chen bstan rgyal
2175
ba dponslob bdun brgya tsam 'chad nyan
mdzad kyi 'dug pasl drung pa'i thugs dgongs2176 la khong dpon slob bdun brgya
2177
po dang I
nged dpon (7Gb) slob
2178
bcu drug po bstan pa la su phan che'i dgongs pa gcig byung I dus phyis
khong bdun brgya pos blo bzani
l79
grags pa gcig p02180 yang mi do bar 'dug gsungs2!811
[2.11.32]
dang po bu ston rin po che'i sras kyi tim b0
2182
mkhan chen dhannii 8rl
2183
dpon slob lnga bcu
tsam bka'2184 (8328) bzhi la 'chad nyan yang dag mdzad pa
2185
gzigs pasl ngas kyang bstan pa
dang serns can la phan thogs 'di tsam 'ong ba
2186
gcig byung na dgongs pa byung ba
2187
lal dus
phyis bstan pa dang sems can la (33a) khong pa bas nga dngos
2188
phan che ba gcig byung 'dug
gsungs
2189
1
[2.11.33]
kbri rgyal bsod nams Ide pas
2l9
1 'phags pa thogs med sang rgyas kyis lung bstan pa'i skyes bu
chenpor 'dug palal rje btsun byams pas dbumamistonpa ci lags zhus pas
2191
1 '0 na ama tshos
bu btsa,2192la dang por sgrub gang brdzis
2193
nas mi ster ba bar ldag pa ster ba ci yin gsungs
2194
1
Ian zhu ba'i SpObS
2195
pa dang braIIol1
2173
2174
2175
2176
2177
2178
2179
2180
2181
2182
2183
2184
2185
2186
2187
2188
2189
2190
2191
2192
219]
2194
2195
ngam rings compl. : abbr. ngaM rings AB.
ngam rings compl. : abbr. ngaM rings AB.
mkhan chen bstan rgyal compl. : abbr. mkhen bstan rgyalB : abbr.: mkhen <chen> stan rgya<l> A.
dgongsB: {---} <dgongs>A.
brgya B : <b>rgya A.
dpon slob A : om. B.
bzang B : bzangs A.
gcig po compl. : abbr. 1 po A : abbr. I B.
'dug gsungscompl. : abbr. 'dug gs+ya B : abbr. 'dugsung A.
Cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. thu bo-I) gtso bo, ... sras kyi thu boo
shrlem.: shdAB.
bka'A :kaB.
dag mdzad pa em. : dag {-} <mdzad pa>A : dag pa mdzad pa B.
'ong ba B : yong pa A.
baB :paA.
pa bas nga dngosem. : pas nga dngossuA: pa bas ngangosB.
'dug gsungs compl. : abbr. abbr. 'dug gs+ya B : abbr. 'dugsung A.
pasA: basB.
ci lags zhus pas A: abbr. ci laD zhu laDB.
btsa' em. : tsha AB; cf. Goldstein 200 I, s.v. bu tsha - 1. son and grandson, 2. son and nephew. Perh.
bu tsho - children. Cf. Goldstein 2001, s.v. bu btsa' - to give birth to a child. Perh. here bu btsa'-
new-born child, baby?
dang por sgrub gang brdzis em. : dang por sgrub gong rdzis A : dang po sgrub dgong rdzis B; cf. Tshig
mdzod chen mo, s.v. rdzi ba (tmd.) brdzis pa, brdzi ba, rdzis 2) gnon pa, ... rkang pas brdzis pa.
According to Tashi Tsering also used for rtsampa rdzi ba-to knead dough from barley flour.
mi ster ba bar Jdag pa ster ba ciyin gsungs em. : mi ster <bar zla kha gter> ci yin gsung A : abbr. mi
gter bar Ida ga ster ba ci yin gs+ya B; cf. Goldstein 200 I, s.v. bar 1. in between, between. Here in the
sense of bar skabs - for a (period of) time, for the time being; Tshig rndzod chen mo, S.V. Jdag pa 2.
skyoma'am, thugpa.
spobs B : spob A.
164 Chapter 5
[2.11.34]
yang longs sprul sangs rgyas min zer mkhan
2196
mang po gda' lags pas
2197
1 ji ltar lags zhus pasl
ding sang gi mkhas pa ' di tsh0
2198
la nges pa tsam mi ' dugl ngas dus 'khor rgyud ' grella' gal' du
yod byas pa lal chos spong gi las yin zer ' dugl longs sprul sangs rgyas min zer mkhan byung
rungl de'i 'dra,?199 lugs kyang yodzer nas ciru yang mi sgom pa
2200
'dug stellongs sprul sangs
rgyas min nal mdo rgyud thams cad bka' min par 'gyur ba la sogs pa nyes pa shin tu che
gsungs
220 1
I
[2.11.35]
gnas brtan dngos grub
2202
na rei 'u'i blama 'di'i kun spyod
2203
bsam gyis mi khyab par2
204
'dugl
blun po gcig dang sdongs dangj2205 de bas ca
2206
drag tsarn/ phar tshad shes pa gcig dang sdongs
kyang I de bas drag tsarn/ bka' bzhi mkhyen pa gcig dang sdongs kyang I de bas [B: cal drag
tsam mkhas pa chen p02207 gcig dang sdongs (710) kyang I de bas ches mngon par mtho bar
mdzad kyin
2208
, dugl nga ni lhag par de rang la mos pa gcig byung (8329) zer! bka' bcu pa yon tan
na rei ngas bla rna 'di bas dkon mchog la dad gus che ba rna mthongl skyid
2209
grong jo bo la
mjal
2210
du byon (33b) res kyis jo bo'i phyag la 'jus nasi spyan ras gzigs mgon
2211
khyed sku ci
, dra dang I zhes sogs kyj2212 810 ka ' don gyin
2213
spyan chab phrol phrol yang gin2214 , dug zer! de
e bden snyamnas dus phyis ched du gnyernas bdag gis kyang bltas
2215
pasl bden par gda'0221611
2196
2197
2198
2199
2200
2201
2202
2203
2204
2205
2206
2207
2208
2209
2210
2211
2212
2213
2214
2215
2216
mkhan B : ba A.
gda ' lags pas em. : brda' lags pa A : abbr. bda' laD pas B; cf. note 2027.
tshoA: abbr. maMsB.
'dra'iB: <'dra'i>A.
sgompaem.: abbr. bsgoMpaB: <b>sgomparA.
chegsungscompl.: abbr. chegs+yaB: che (_oj gSl/flgA.
brtan dngos grob B : abbr. bstan dng+roub A.
Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. lmn spyod -Jam tu spyodpa ste, Ius ngag yid gsum mam de gsumgang
rung gi bya spyod dam spyod lam.
gyis mi khyab par em. : abbr. gyimi khyab par A: gyis mi khyab pa B.
dang B : kyang A.
Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. ca2) ming mtha' la j'ug tsheskabs 'gar gsal byed cha dang 'dra ba.
mkhas pa chen po campI. : abbr. mkhas pa cheno B : mkhas chen A.
kyin A : kyiB.
skyidem. skyiB: kyiA.
mjal em. : 'jal AB.
mgonA: dbangB.
zhes sags kyi compl. : abbr. zhesoD kyiB : ces so" sa A.
shlo ka 'don gyin B : sho 10 ka 'don kyin A.
phrol phrol yang gin A : khral khraf 'ong giB. Tashi Tsering: phrollike ral mo phrol- tear are rolling
continuously. Cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. sil snyan dkrol ba, ral mo dkrol ba. Jaschke 1881: dkrol
ba v. 'khrol ba. Jaschke 1881: 'khral ba, pf. and fut. dkrol, imp. khrol. Goldstein 2001, S.v. sil snyan
dkrol- to play the cymbals. Cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. spyan chab - mig chu'i zhe sa, ... spyan
chab 'byin du nye, ... spyan chab nyil nyil mdzad Cf. Goldstein 2001, s.v. mig chu nyil nyil, mig chu
long, long, mig chu lhung lhung- eyes full of tears, eyes brimming with tears. See also Tshig mdzod
chen rna, s.v. Phnun phrum ... mig chu phrum phrum 'bab pa. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. lum lum ...
mig chu hun lum du gtong ba. However, no entrances for phral phral, dkrol, dkrol, khral, khral etc.
bltas em. : ltas AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. Ita ba 1. (td.) bIt as pa, bita ba, ltos.
gda '0 A : bda'oB.
Text Edition
165
gsang phu ba'i2217 slob dpon rgyal dbang na rei ngas bla rna su bya ba'i rtsar bsdad de
2218
1 sdug
bsngal rang 'gag pa
2219
'gro ba red rnda' ba
2220
min pa rna rnthong zerl 'jam dbyangs pa na rei
'ga' zhig da Ita bodna slob dpon
2221
pas mkhas parned zer na'ang I nga'i lugs kyi rgyagar shar
nub rgya nag bal po marns na bstan pa mal rna rned par' dug pasl da Ita' dzarn bU
2222
gling na
slob dpon mkhas pa bas mkhas pa rned par go gsungsl drung nas khri skor gzhan dU
2223
gshegs
tsa nal zhal du rni 'don yang thugs
2224
khral cher rndzad! byang du phebs
2225
zer bi gsan rna
khad! shin tu gtarn snyan/ rten gsum byinrlabg2226 canre yodna'ang yodzer ba lal de 'dra dang
mnyarn
2227
po min! gzhung lugs pa chen po phyag phebs
2228
pa tsarn gyis
2229
phyogs bkra shis pa
yin zer nas rnynes tshor chen po rndzad doll
mkhan chen bsod nams skyabs pa
2230
na rei nga'i bla rna'i
2231
yon tan chung shos [B: kyang /]
gzhan gyis
2232
rni dol bla rna [B: nil ri phug tu bzhugs
2233
kyang I gos dar gyi na bza,2234 phangs
rned la sgom22351 gzhan sde bdag tu sgom
2236
pa mams kyang I nang du hrul chas gyon zhingl
phyjr2237 'gro dus gzob par 'dug (71 b) gsungs (34a) (S330) te
2238
shin tu mad dol j2239
drnu rdzing na bzhugs
2240
dus bka' bcu pa don seng gis rnjal du phyin pas
2241
chos zhusl grol ba
dang 'gro ba'i grabs byas
2242
pasl khyed de
2243
ring 'gro nal rta = gyi zarn pa thon tsam der
2217
2218
2219
2220
2221
2222
2223
2224
2225
2226
2227
2228
2229
2230
2231
2232
2233
2234
2235
2236
2231
2238
2239
2240
2241
2242
2243
phu ba'iem.: bu ba'iA : phupa'iB.
rtsar bsdad de A : Jtsa bar sdad ste B; cf. Jaschke 1881: rtsa ba, Jtsa bar, and rtsarwith genit. to, at, e.g.
to be at, both of persons and things; at, near, to, e.g. chu'i rtsar- at, near, to a river; Tshig mdzod chen
mo, s.v. sdod pa (tmd.) bsdad pa, bsdad pa, sdod - gnas pa dang, 'dug pa.
rang 'gag pa compI. : <rang 'gag> pa A : rang 'gaD la B.
mda' baem.: mda'paA: 'da'paB.
slob dpon compI. : abbr. <slaun> A : abbr. slaun B.
'dzam bu compI. : 'dzaM bu A : 'dzam+bu'i B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'dzam bugling
<jambudvipa> gling bzhi'i ya gyal zhig ste, drab Iho ngos su yod pa 'i gling chen.
nas khri skor gzhan du B : gnas khri bskor gzhan su A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s. v. khd skor.
thugscompI.: thuDB: thugA.
phebs B : pheb A.
by/n rlabs B : byin brlabs A; cf. note 71.
mnyam A : snyaMB.
phyag phebs em. : phyag pheb A : phyaD phebs B.
tsam gyiscompI. : tsaM gyis A: om. B.
mkhan chen bsod nams skyabs pa compI. : abbr. mkhen bsod <naMs> skyabs pa A; abbr. mkhen
bsodMs skyabs B.
ma'iA:ma'di'iB.
gyis B : gyi<s> A.
tu bzhugscompI.: abbr. tu bzhuDB: du bzhugA.
bza'B :zaA.
phangs med la sgom em.: 'phang med la bsgom A: 'phangs med la bsgoms B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen
mo, s.v. sgom pa 1. (td.) bsgoms pa, bsgom pa, sgoms.
sgom em. : abbr. bsgoM A : <bya> bsgoMB.
zhing phyir em. : shing phyir A : zhing phyi la B.
gzob par 'dug gsungs te em. : bzob par 'dug ste gsung A : bzob par gdug gs+ya te B; cf. Goldstein
2001, s.v. gzob, pf. gzabs, f. gzab, imp. gzobs-to do/act with care.
mad do B : abbr. mod A. Tashi Tsering: old wording like bden no.
dmurdzingna bzhugsem. : abbr. dmurdzingdu bzhuDB: smuldzingna bzhugA.
gismjalduphyinpasem.: gismjal du byonnasB: gi 'jal duphyinpasA.
ba'igrabs byasB : pa'i grabs byas A; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.v. grabs 2. - byed-to make preparations.
deA: daB.
166 Chapter 5
rgyugs gsungs
2244
I bdag cag de phyogs la mi ' gro lagg2245 zhus pasl a ha nga ni bul rong na yod
pa'i bsams
2246
pa gcig byung , dug gsungs
2247
1 bdag gis drung du phyin nasi bka' bcu pa la de ltar
gsungs lags
2248
sam zhus pasl de byung I nga la bul rong ~ luni
249
pa ya gi [B: la] pha yul 'gyi
snang ba
2250
gcig 'char gyin
225
! 'dug stel bag chags brtas
2252
pa yin [B: pa 'dra] gsungs
2253
1 ri
khrod dga,2254 rno ya gi myed pa 'phags chen chos bzang dpal gyi bka' drin yin gsungs
2255
1
[2.11.36]
'phags chen chos bzang dpallarnjal
2256
du byon dus khyed bstanparinpo che'i bdagpo yin2257
pasl de !tar thugs
2258
khur bzhes
2259
gcig/ sangs rgyas kyi bstan pa rin po che ' di khyed kyi phyag
nayoddoll
bstan pa rin po che
2260
, di la khyed shes soil
zhes gsungs
2261
nasi phyag nas bzung zhing zhal ta
2262
rnang po gnang ba'i
2263
rntharl khyed
kyis
2264
bstan pa rin po che la sngar phyag rjes rndzad pa'i
2265
rtsorn pa rndzad pa
2266
mams kyi
dkar chag kyang'dir 'khod gsungs
2267
nasi gong du bstan pa'i gsuni
268
sgros mams dgung 10
nyi shu rtsa bdun pa yar bcad
2269
10 ' di la ' di rndzad kyi dkar chag kyang rndzad doll
2244
2245
2246
2247
2248
2249
2250
2251
2252
225)
2254
2255
2256
2257
2258
2259
2260
2261
2262
2263
2204
2265
2266
2267
2268
2269
rgyugs gsungsem. : abbr. rgyug gs+yaB : abbr. rgyugsung A; cf. note 2115.
Jagscompl.: abbr.laDB: JagA.
bsamsem.: abbr. bsaMAB.
'dug gsungscompl. : abbr. 'dug gs+yaB: 'dugsung A.
gsungs lags em. : gsungs lag A : abbr. gs+ya ba laD B.
lung A : 'dungB.
baB:paA.
gyin B : gin A.
bag chags brtas compl. : abbr. bag ch+ya brtas B : bag chag brdas A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v.
brta ba(tmd.) brtas pa, brta ba -rgyas pa. Goldstein 2001, S.v. brta 1. to grow (m strength/power/size).
gsungscompl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
dga'B: dga"(sic) A.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
mjalB : 'jal A.
yin A : abbr. y+niB.
thugs compl. : abbr. th+ya B : thug A; cf. Goldstein 2001, S.v. (h) sems khur byed - to show
concern/interest
bzhesB : g{-}zhesA.
Tin po che compl. : abbr. done AB.
zhes gsungs em. : zhes gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
bzung zhing zhal ta compl. : abbr. bzung zhing zhal+ta A : abbr. zung zhing zhalta B; cf. Tshig mdzod
chen mo, s.v. 'dzinpa 1. (td.) bzungba, gzung ba, zungl) 'chang ba;Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. zhal
ta - slob stan.
gnang ba 'i compl. : abbr. gnang'iB : gnang pa 'i A.
kyis B : kyi A.
des mdzadpa'iem. : bzhes mdzadpa'i A: abbr. des bzhag'iB; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.v. phyagbzhes
1. h. of lag len; Goldstein 2001, s.v. phyag des h. of lag des 2. accomplishment, achievement.
mdzad pa A : om. B.
'khod gsungs em.: 'khod gsung A : abbr. khod gs+ya B.
gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
pa yar bcad A : <pa> mar bcadB; cf. Goldstein: yar bcad pa - except for, excluding; yan chad - (usu.
with numbers) above, upwards of, more than, over, 2. before; man cad (du) = man chad (du) 1. below,
under, lower, before, 3. from this time on.
Text Edition
167
[2.11.37]
drung nas
2270
grod chung du bzhugs dusl skyid groni
271
jo bo la phyag zhabs kyi gdu bu mams
tshod kyis brdungs
2272
nas 'bul du btang basi bsgrigs ran par273 byung/ drung nas phyag tshacf274
(34b) mdzad pa lags
2275
sam zhus p ~ s l ma byas che chung 'tsham pa
2276
jo bo rang gi thugs rje yin
(72a) (S331) gsungs
2277
I
bdag gis mkhan chen g.yag pa la mjaJ2
278
du phyin dusl khong pa la chos rje 10 tstsha bal Jje
btsunpa bIb bzang grags
2279
pa gsumgang lhag zhus [B: pas]1 slob dpon gzhon blo balta bu'i2280
dge ba'i bshes gnyen ding sang dka' mor gtad
2281
yod gsuni
282
zhing I khong pa'i phar phyin
gyi tlkii de la bltas
2283
pasl nang' gal' ga' yar 'dugl khong byams chos sems tsam yin gsuni
284
na'angl ngabka' ru2285 'dod del byams pa sangs rgyas yin pa'iphyir/khong gsang 'dus pa chen
po yin pas! 'jam dbyangs da! gyi gtso bor mdzad kyin yod yongp286 'jam dbyangs dang byams
pa gnyis sangs rgyas yin na yin nmyarnl min na min rnnyam yin nga zer kyin
2287
'dug slob dpon
la zhus gcig gsungs
2288
nas zhus pasl nang 'gal than thun yod srid! 'khrulmed smra ba'i 'phags
par ngas khas blangs
2289
pa med! khong gis
2290
nang' gal du bzung ba mams nang' gal e yin rni
shesl bstan pa 'di gzhir bzhag la byams pa byang sems dang I byams chos lnga bstan bcos su
bshad 'dugl khoni
291
rang sangs rgyas pas lhag gsungs na'ang dbang chel rdo rje theg pa'i rgya
2270
2271
2272
2273
2274
2275
2276
2277
2278
2279
2280
2281
2282
2283
2284
2285
2286
2287
2288
2289
2290
2291
nasB: {-}nasA.
skyid grong B : kyi rang A; cf. Ehrhard (2004: 78): skyid grongjo bo: "Ehrwiirdiger Herr von sKyid-
grang."
brdungs B : brdung A.
bas bsgrigs ran par em. : pas krig ran par A : abbr. bas dkriD ran pa B; c sgng pa (td.) bsgrigs pa,
bsgrig pa, sgrigs 1) gshom pa.
dmng nas phyag tshadB: drung {-}nas phyag tshad de A.
JagscompJ.: abbr. JaDB: JagA.
che chung 'tshampa em. : abbr. che chung mtshaM{-} paA: 'fshampaB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo,
s.v. 'tshampa2. (td.) 'tshamspa, 'tshampa-ranpa'ammthunpa,. .. chechung 'tshampa.
gsungscompJ. : abbr. gs+ya B : {yin} gsung A.
mjaJ em. : 'jaJ AB.
grags A : om. B.
Jta bu 'i compJ. : abbr. JtlI 'i AB.
mor gtad A : mo Ja btadB.
gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
pa'ipharphyingyi TIkA deja bJtasem.: abbr. 'i phar phyin+yi Tika de JaJtasB : paspharphyin gyi
Ti ka de Ja bJtas A.
gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
mB:mdeA.
kyin yod yong A : kyiyod 'ong B.
yin na yin mnyam, min na min mnyam yin nga zer kyin em. : abbr. yin na yin snyaM min na min
snyaM nga zer kyin A : abbr. yin nEi yin nmyaM yin zer kyiB. This is colloquial and means: yin na yin
khyab mynam yin; cf Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. yin khyab nmyam - phan tshun gcig yin na, Clg shos
kyang yin dgos pa 'j don de.
gSlIngscompJ.: abbr. gs+yaB: gsungA.
bJangs B : bJang A; bJangs = fut. of len pa.
gisB :giA.
khong A kho B.
168 Chapter 5
phar phyin thei
292
pa 1a bkab rung I zhwa dpe
2293
!ham 1a bkab pa bya ba mkhas pa'i lugs rna
yin gsungs
2294
1
mkhan ehen ehos dpa1 ba'i gsuni295 nas 'urang mthong lam thob thob Ita ba'i gtarn mazer
296
1
de nas shes' oni
297
gsuni298 zer ba drung du bskyar bas
2299
I mthong lam Ita ba
2300
mam par dag
pa'i 'bras bu yin pa la Ita ba rna shes par mthong lam gcig thob (35a) mi shes
230l
i kha phye na
zong zad pa'i lab (S332) yin gsungs
2302
I '
[2.11.38]
ehos rj es 10 tstsha ba dang I bla rna dbang pas gdan 'dren btang (72b) bas
2303
mkharns bzang zhing
rten 'breI 'grig na 'ong bat"304 zhu zhus pasl 10 tstsha bas dgon pa brtsigs"305 nas khal nyis stong
tsam bsagsl de 'i rgyab eha'i sha marl gos stan
2306
me shing sogs bSgrugs"307 nasi da lam
2308
phebs
pa gcig yong
2309
na zhes yid smon du mdzad eing I gdan 'dren btangbas
2310
1 nged na so rgasl
sha Ius leis bas
23ll
1 'gru12312 mi pher bat"313 'dug gsungs nasi thugs dam gyi gtso b0
2314
'jam
dbyangs kyi Ii sku mtshar p02315 gcig zhu rten la phul nas ma,2316 byon/
2292
2293
2294
2295
2296
2297
2298
2299
2300
2301
2)02
2303
2)04
2305
2306
2307
2308
2309
2310
2311
2]12
2313
2314
2315
2316
theg pa'i rgya phar phyin theg campI. : abbr. theg'i rgya phar phyin theg B : thegs pa'i rgya phar phyin
thegsA.
dpe B : dpe' A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. zhwa dpe lham 'gebs - dpe don mam pa 'gal
ba .. .phyogs tsam gyi nyams myong la blten nas yongs khyab la zhwa dpe lham 'gebs kyis bed spyod
gtang na nor 'khrul yong sdd
gsungs campI. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
gtam ma zercompl. : abbr. abbr. gtaM ma zer B : lab ma zer A.
'ong B : yong A.
gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
bskyar bas A : skyar bas B; cf. Jiischke: skyor ba 1. vb. pf. & ft. bskyar2. to repeat.
Ita ba B : abbr. Ita ba 'j dg+s A.
mi shes em. : ngos shes AB.
zong zad pa'i lab yin gsungs em. : zong zad pa 'j lab yin gsung A : abbr. <zong> zad pa 'j lab y+ni
gs+yaB.
basB :pasA.
'gdg na 'ong bar B : 'gdg yong par A.
bJtsigs compl. : abbr. brtslD B : brtsig A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. rtsig pa 1. (td.) bJtsigs pa,
brtzig pa, rtzigs - rtzig pa rgyag pa.
stan A : bstan B.
bsgmgs em. : sgmgs B : bsgmbs A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. sgrug pa - (td.) bsgrugs pa, bsgrug
pa, sgmgs - yar len.
lam campI. : abbr. laMB: abbr. naM (-) A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. da Jam - nye char.
yongA: 'ongB.
'dren btang bas B : <'dren> btang pas A.
basB :pasA.
'grul A: 'dmlB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. 'grul ba- (tmd.) lam du skyodpa'am 'gra ba.
barB: baA.
gtso bo campI. : abbr. gtsau B : abbr. gtsaur A.
mtshar po em. : 'tshar po B: 'tshar mo A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. mtshar po - mtshar ba dang
'dra. Goldstein 2001, s.v. mtsharpo- beautiful, gorgeous.
maB: <ma>A.
Text Edition
169
drung nas thugs shes kyis rnkhyen nas stag tshang du dus zini
317
chen po yong ba
2318
dang I yon
rochod gnyis ka'i sku tshe thung ngu las mi yong ba
2319
mkyhen nas ma byon par gragsl
[2.11.39]
bul rong du snga rting la 10 bcu gnyis bzhugs
2320
pa lal 10 lnga drung pa rang gis2321 thugs dam
rtse gcig tu [B: mdzad]1 10 bdun la chos 'khor ci rigs su bskoy2322 zhini
323
bul rong shod du
bzhugs dUS
2324
rnkhan chen dpal 'byor ba chos Ije mchog bzang bas
2325
gtso mdzad chos kho na
. don du gnyer ba'i dge 'dun sha stag brgyad CU
2326
tsam la gsang 'dus kyi rgyudl rtsa 'jug bzhi
gsum Ita khrid sogs zhib rgyas su gnang I gsan rnkhan mams la yang bya rgyu chos las med pasl
nyin2327 mtshan chos kho nas ' da' ba byung/ sa cha bgro<t2
328
dka' mo der yang I sa skya tshun
chad bsnyegs
2329
nasi bsnyen bkuy2330 bzang la mang ba byung I bul rong du bstan pa myed
d a n ~ 3 1 bkur sti
2332
bcas pa de bas !hag pa dus gsum du khebs2
333
(35b) zer roll
[2.11.40]
de'i phyi 10 dmu rdzing dU
2334
slob dpon chen po nam rnkha' dpal bas gtso mdzadl brag (8333)
ram rnkhan chen! slob dpon las ston! 'dar pa mgon seng I Sgrub2335 chen rna dpal (73a) mol yon
bdag dpon po rtogs ldan la sogs pa
2336
brgya dang brgyad bCU
2337
tsam la gsang , dus kyi rgyudl
rtsa 'jug gnyisl Ita khrid dang bcas pa gnang ngoll
2317
2318
2319
2320
2321
2322
2323
2324
232S
232.
2327
2328
2329
2330
2331
2332
2333
2334
2335
233.
2337.
zingern. : gzingA : zingsB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y.jun gardus zing; Goldstein: jun gardus
zing- the Dzunggar Disturbance (of 1717-1718). Goldstein 2001: dus zing- a time of disturbance,
chaos.
yong ba em. : yong pa A: 'ong ba B.
yong ba A: 'ong ba B.
bzhugsA: abbr. bzhuDB.
gisA :giB.
bskorA: skorB.
zhing B : eing A.
bzhugs dus em. : bzhug dus A : om. B.
basB :pasA.
brgyad eu em. : brgyad beu B : brgya beu A.
nyin A : i1yin pa B.
bgrod A : grodB.
tshun chad bsnyegs em. : tshun chad snyaD B : abbr. tshun {tha} Md snyag A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen
mo, s.y. tshun chad
bsnyen bkur em. : bsnyen bskur A : bmyed bkur B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. bsnyen bkur - sri
zhu m zhabs tog.
myed dang A : abbr. bmyeddB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. myed bkur - myed pa dang bkur sti
ste, nor rdzas 'buf mtshon dang, bkur sti gus 'dud
bkur sti em. : bkur bstir B : bskur stir A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. bkur sti - brtsi bkur ram,
bsnyen bkur. .
dukhebsem.: abbr. dukheDB: <du>khyegA; cf. A': khyab;Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.y. khebspa
(tmd.) khayb pa, ... gsofja khebs song ngam, ... gos kyis bkab nas khebs pa, ... sa gzhi sbar mos bkab pas
khebs dogs med
dmurdzingduem.: c/murdzingB: smurdzingduA.
sgrubB: bsgrubA; cf. p. 146, 169, 170, 171.
1a sogs pa compI. : abbr. foD pa B : <swo> A.
brgya dang brgyad eu em. : <brgya> brgyad beu B : brgya brgya eu A.
170
Chapter 5
[2.11.41]
chos sum gnyis tsarn song pa
2338
dang I sgrub chen rna2339 dpal rno la/ narn srnad mi rna yin chen
po gcig dngos su 'ongs
2340
nas/khyod narn langs pa dang/bla rna'i drung durgyugs2341la phyag
gsurn phul [B: la]1 drung nas bstan pa dang serns can gyi don la yun ring du bzhugs su gso! zhes
Ian gsurn gsoIf
342
bar chad chen po byung dogs
2343
'dug goll
zer ba de thos pas Sgrub
2344
chen rna dang langs
2345
tel thugs mi
2346
bde ba byung I narn langs pa
dang I drung du zhu ba gal chen gcii
347
yod pas I cis kyang , ong ba
2348
zhu zhus pas shog
gsungs nas
2349
1 gong du zer ba bzhin phyag phu! gsol ba btab nasl'di bdag la gyis zer mkhan
gcig byung ba rna gtogs
235
1 bdag gis rdzun nam ZOi
351
yin na drung gi bka' sruni
352
mams
kyis chad pa chod byas pasl mna,2353 skyel gyin khyed lardzun yin
2354
zer ba'i gal rned rnchi
2355
I
nged sa skyar ' chad nyan byed dusl 10 grangs
2356
, di tsarn la
2357
, chi zer ba'i sgra chen po gcii
358
byung ba yin tel dedus brtags pas
2359
1 re gcig pa la 'chi ba 'dug snyarn pa byungl da lomi 'chi
yang sang phod skyas chen
2360
yin pas [B: 'chi 'am] snyam gyin 'dug gsungs
2361
1
2338
2339
2340
2341
2]42
2343
2344
2345
2346
2347
2348
2349
2350
2351
2352
2353
2354
2355
2356
2357
2358
2359
2360
2361
baB :paA.
sgrub chenmaem. : bsgrub chen maA: sgrub chen moB; cf. p. 146, 169, 170, 17l.
'ongsB : yongs A; cf. note 955.
rgyugsem.: rgyugAB; cf. note 2115.
gsol A: zhusB.
dogscompl. : abbr. doDB : dog A; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.Y. dogs 1. (yb. + -) haying suspicions/ doubts/
fears/ apprehensions.
sgrub B : bsgrub A.
dang1angscompl.: abbr. dangngsB: ddangA.
miB :maA.
chen gcigcompl. : abbr. chen 1 B : abbr. can 1 A.
'ong ba B : yong pa A.
pas shog gsungs nas em. : <pas> shog gsung nas A : abbr. pas shog gs+ya nas B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen
mo, s.y. shog 1.1) tshur 'bod pa 'i skultshig cig ... tshur shog.
bamagtogsem.: abbr. ba'martoDB :pamagtogA ..
bdag gis rdzun nam zogcompl. : abbr. bdagis rdzunaM zog A : abbr. rdzunaM zog B.
srungem. : bsrung A : bsrungs B.
mna ' skye1 A : gna' skydB.
rdzun yin A : brdzun B.
mchiB: 'chi A.
grangs B : grang A.
laB: naA.
sgra chen po gcigcompl. : abbr. sgra cheno <1> A: abbr. sgra 1 B.
brtags pas em. : brtag pas A : abbr. <b>rtaD pa B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. rtog pa 1. (td.) brtags
pa, brtag pa, rtogs':' rags par dpyod pa.
yang sang phod skyas chen A : abbr. phod skyag cheno B.
gyin 'dug gsungs em. : gyin 'dug gsung A : abbr. gi 'dug gs+ya B.
Text Edition
171
[2.11.42]
drung pa la skyei
362
chen pas bsu skyeg skyon
2363
che ba gcig gda,2364 lagsl de dus kyi 10
rtags2365 gang yin brtsl bar
366
zhu d ~ g zhus pas
2367
I rtsis pas Sgrub
2368
chen rna (36a) dani
369
gcig
, par byung I de nas chos grol ba dang I bul rong du (S334) byon pas sku rntshams
2370
dam po gcig
rndzad par zhul bdag gis kyang gdan bzhugi
371
gcig la 'ong2l72 zhus nasI Ijes su gdan bzhugs
zab p02373 gcigphul bas 10 'ga' yar
374
skukhams bzang po 'ong ba'?375 bltas byung gsungs
2376
1
[2.11.43]
de'i phyi 10 mnga' (73b) ris phyogs sa cha bzang zhing I rni blo las su rung ba
2377
'dug pasl 'gro
gsungi378 nas I 'jam dbyangs pas rgya mkhar bar bdaSZ
379
pas rna non! chen po dpalldan pas
cung thug bdas2380 nasI zhu ba phul yang rna gsan par mnga' ris SU
2381
byon! yar res
2382
ne rini
383
pa'i dbon po gnyis
2384
la dge tshul gyi bslab bya mams gnani
385
1 dpon po rtogs ldan pa la dge
,36'
2363
2364
2365
2366
2367
2368
2369
2370
2371
2372
2373
2374
2375
2376
2371
2378
2379
2380
2381
2382
2383
2384
2385
skyeg B : skeg A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. skyeg(rnying) - bar chad ... 10 skyeg .. .10 tog 1a skyeg
chen byung ba. Goldstein 2001: skyeg- sm. skeg. Goldstein 2001: skeg- sm. skag; Goldstein 2001:
skag - an inauspicious year astrologically when one is most open to personal misfortune or danger
(occurs once eyery twelYe years in one's animals birth year).
skyeg skyon em. : skeg rkyon A : skyeg skyeg B.
gda'A: bda'B.
rtags em. : rta B : de A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 10 rtags 1) 'byung rtsis skabs 10 khams so so
mtshon byed kyi dud 'gro bcu gnyis, ... 2) rang skyes pa 'i 10 rtags.
brtsi bar A : rtsi ba B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. rtsi ba (td.) brtsis pa, brtsi ba, rtzis 1) grangs ka
rgyagpa.
pasA :nasB.
sgrub B : bsgrub A.
dang A : abbr. gs+ya ba dang B.
mtshams em. : abbr. mtshaM A : abbr. 'tshaMs B.
bzhugscompL: abbr. bzhug+sA: abbr. bzhuDB.
'ongB: 'ongsA.
bzhugs zab po compL : abbr. bzhug+s zab po A : abbr. bzhuD zab mo B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo,
s.y. zabpo-zabmo dang 'dra.
Cf. note 1700.
'ongba'iB :yongpa'iA.
gsungs compL : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
Goldstein 2001, s.Y. b10 1as- worry, worrying. llluminator, s.Y.1as su rung ba- "To be workable," "to
be fit for the purpose at hand." In some contexts this will be "to become fit for the task."
gsungs compL : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
bdasB: brdasA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'dedpa (td.) bdaspa, bda' ba, dedI) mtharskrodpa
dang, des su snyeg pa. liischke 1881: 'ded pa - go or walk behind, 1. to driYe, 2. to pursue, chase, run
after.
bdas B : brdas A.
suA: laB.
resB: abbr. ressaA.
ring A : rings B.
gnyis compL : abbr. 2 A : om. B.
roams gnangcompL : abbr. roaMs gnang A : gnang B.
172
Chapter 5
slong gi sdom pa gnang2386 I khong mam pas2387 kyang I 'bul 'degs
2388
phun sum tshogs pa
mdzad nasi stag rtse bas brag nag bar bskya1
2389
I de nas mnga' ris pas bsus tel rdzong2390 dkar du
phyag phebsl gung thang khab pas shang2391 len phun sum tshogs [B: pal mdzad doll
[2.11.44]
de nas mang yu1 du byon tel rang byon phags pa'i drung du phyag dang mchod pa rgya chen po
phull thani
392
sher pa dbon po la rab byung gi sdom pa gnang nasi me tog mdangs
2393
can gyi
nags khrod
2394
du sgrub pa la byon noll
[2.11.45]
de dus gzhi bdag btsan
2395
rje zer bal chos la dkar ba
2396
gcig yod pa yoni
397
nasi nga la chang
gcig 'dren gyin2398 'dug chang mi 'thung ba
2399
la snyam pas mar khur song nas dum bu zhig
btungs
2400
nas bzhagl 'bul ba zang zini
401
mang po [B: yang] byed kyin2402 'dugl de nas zhag
bzhi lnganasl rgya'i 'bul ba de
2403
(36b) sleb byung I de gzhi bdag gis tshorba 'dra
2404
snyampa
gcig byung gsungs
2405
I
238.
2387
2388
2389
2390
2391
2392
2393
2394
2395
2396
2397
2398
2399
2400
2401
2402
2403
2404
2405
rnams gnangcompl. : abbr. rnaMs gnang A : gnang B.
pas B : <bas> A.
'degs compl. : abbr. 'deD B : 'deg A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'degs pa (td.) bteg pa, gdeg pa,
theg. Tshigmdzod chenmo, S.Y. 'bul rten - 'blll bya'i dngospa. Tshigmdzod chenmo, S.Y. 'degs rten
- zhu yig dang mnyam du 'bul rgyu'i dngos rdzas. See also note 2408.
brag nag bar bskyal em. : brag nag bar skyalB : abbr. graD na phar la bskyal A. Note that in ms. A the
particle la is marked by dots.
pas bsus te rdzong B : abbr. pasuste rdzong A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. bsu ba 1. (td.) bsus pa,
bsu ba, bsus.
shang A: shangs B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. shang - gshang dang 'dra; gshang - bon po'i ral
mo zhig. liischke 1881: shangy. gshang; gshang- a musical instrument, esp. used by the Bonpo. Tashi
Tsering: thinks from the context and together with phlW sum !shogs pa that shang len means to "offer
hospitality." Cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. sna len - sne len dang 'dra. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y.
sne len - mgran po mams la kha len ngo len byed pa 'i las don, ... sne len zhus pa, .. .mgron por ja chang
bshams nas sne len byed
thangcompl.: <thang>A: om. B.
mdangs em. : mdang AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. mdangs 1) mdog gam bkrag.
nags khrod compl. : abbr. naD khrodB : nag khrod A.
btsan B : brtsan A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. btsan - 'dre'i nang gses shig ... n btsan, ... chll btsan.
baA :poB.
yong A: 'ongs B.
gyin A : gyiB.
'thung ba B: mthung paA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'thung ba (td.) btungs pa, btung ba, 'thungs.
dum bu gcig btungs em. : abbr. dum pa 1 'thungs AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. dum gcig - dum
bu gcig ste cha shas.
zang zing B : zang {--} <zing> A.
kyin A : kyiB.
de A : des B; sleb pa and 'byung ba are both intransitive verbs.
gis tshorba 'draA: gitshorba 'draB; Tashi Tsering: here tshorba=to know, 'dra=it seems.
gsungs compl. : abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
Text Edition
173
[2.11.46]
de nas sku mtshams
2406
gro1 ba(S335) dang Ibdag chen ma
2407
[B: sangs rgyal mos] bod du spyan
drangsl dpon slob mams ri 'dabs su dbyar rgyags ' degs
2408
'bul ba yang phun sum tshogs par
409
phull
[2.11.47]
de dus drung slob dponmas gtso mdzadl chen po chos dpal bal slob dpon yi dam dpallbka' bcu
pa
2410
don yod seng ge ba
2411
la sogs pa
2412
brgya [dang] brgyad bCU
2413
tsam lal gsang 'dus rim
lngal Ita khrid blo sbyong I rtsa 'jug gnyisl gsang , dus kyi rgyud kyi bshad pa la sogs zab rgyas
su gnang zhing I nmga' (74a) bdag sku mchedlbdag mo mchedl zhang blon 'ga' yarla yani
414
gsang , dus kyi dbang gnang I dpon zhang nam mkha' stobs rgyal ba kIm dbon la bsnyen rdzogs
dang rab byung gi sdom pa gnang I de dus nmga' bdagyum sras pa
2415
mams la bstan 'gyur
bzhengs gsung ba,?416 zhal ta gnang bas
2417
1 bdag chen ma'i gsuni
418
nasi drung nas
2419
thugs
rjes bzung ba'i zhal ta yin! bdag cag rang ci 'byor byed par zhu zhus pasl de shin tu legs
gsungs
2420
nas nmyes tshor cher mdzad d0
2421
II
kong tshos bIos rna blangs nal pal]. chen sakya srIs2422 kyang bod yul gyi 'bul nod
2423
thams cad
khro phu'i [B: rgyal ba] byams pa bzhengs pa la btang gsung
2424
I ngas kyang pu rangs man
chad
2425
'di 'grirns na
2426
bstan 'gyur 'grub
2427
tsam gyi dnogs chas
2428
'grub bsams pa gcii
429
byung na'ang I sde pas bzhengs pa shin tu legs gsungs
2430
nasi bdag chen rna lal bka,2431 ru rna
2406
2407
2408
2409
2410
2411
2412
2413
2414
2415
2416
2417
2418
2419
2420
2421
2422
2423
2424
2425
2426
2427
2428
2429
2430
2431
mtshamsem. : abbr. mtshaM A: 'tshams B.
maB: masA.
rgyags 'degs em. : abbr. rgyaD bteg B : rgyags teg A; cf. note 2388. Illuminator, s.y. 'degs pa - II.
<noun> used in combination with other words to give the sense of a support.
parA :paB.
paB: baA.
don yod seng ge ba A : abbr. don seng B.
pa compl. : <pa> B : om. A.
brgyad cu B : brgya bcu A.
layangA: om. B.
yum sras pa compl. : abbr. yuM sras pa B : abbr. yuM sras <pa> A.
bzhengs gsung ba 'i em. : bzhengs gsu<ng> A : gzhengs gsung ba 'iB.
basB :pasA.
gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
nas B : gnas A.
legs gsungs compl. : abbr. leD gs+ya B : abbr. Jegsung A.
mdzad do compl. : abbr. mdzado A : mdzadB.
shrIB : shri A.
nodB : snod A.
gsungA: 'dugB.
kyang pu rangs man chad em. : pu rangs mar bcadB : kyang spu rangs man chad A; cf. Tshig mdzod
chen mo, S.Y. man chad - dus sam gnas kyimtshams 'byed pa 'j tshig.
naB: nasA.
'grubB: grubA.
chasem. : chaAB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. dngoschas-dngospo'i yo byad
gcigcompl. : abbr. 1 A: om. B.
gsungscompl.: abbr. gs+yaB: gsungA.
bka' A: dka'B.
174 Chapter 5
dngul bre chen gcigl gos phyi nang bzang po [B: ma] (37.) lngal ber thul
2432
thung rini
433
re rei
rgya'i rdor rje dang dril bU
2434
gcigl gan dkar [B: gcig] mams gnang nasi bdag chen mas
kyani
435
I thugs (8336) khur cher bzhes 'bad rtsol bton
2436
pasl 10 gcig gi khongs su bar chad riled
par grub pas bia ma byin rlabs che zhing I yon bdag mo sku bsod dang blo stobs che ba'i grags
pa byung ngoll
[2.11.48]
de nas rab gnas la rdzong dka,il437 spyan drangs tel dpal gsang ba 'dus pa'i dkyil 'khor gyi zhal
phye na Sgrub
2438
mchod rgyas par mdzad pasl gsung rab zhal dr<1
439
zhing byin rlabs
2440
che bal
mchod gnas ngo dr0
2441
yon bdag bkra shis pa phyogs byin chags pa'j2442 rab gnas mdzad doll
drung du gser ngo ma
2443
srang bdun/ gos ta hun
2444
gyi snam bem
2445
gcig gis mgo byas kyi 'bul
nod
2446
rgya chen po mdzad dusl drung gis (74b) zhal tas
2447
bdag mol mi Ius thob pa don yod
pa
2448
bya ba de Ita bu Ia Zer ba yin! chos Ia bya ba byas pa rang sangs rgyas 8U skye bar mdo
sde
2449
du ma nas gsungsf
450
ding sang dbus gtsani
451
gi sde pa su stobs che yang I snag shog
glegs
2452
shing I glo bur2
453
dgos na 'byor ba2
454
shin tu dka' gsung zhini
455
I de ltar Sgrub
2456
pa'i
2432
2433
2434
2435
2436
2437
2438
2439
244.
2441
2442
2443
2444
2445
2446
2447
2448
244.
2450
2451
2452
2453
2454
2455
2456
liischke 1881: ber- cloak, berthut-furcloak. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. ben thut -zlagam (spel-
ling mistake for ber thuI!); cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. ber- zia gam. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v.
ber chen - zla gam gzab chen. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sku ber - zla gam mam, gos ber. Goldstein
2001, s.v. gos ber- monk's cloak. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. thut pa - nang du spu yod pa 'i zia gam.
Goldstein 200 I, s.v. thui pa - a kind of fleece cloak /dress.
thung dng em. : thong dngs A : thongs lings B. Cf. note 2557.
roo Jje dang drii bu compl. : abbr. rdor ddi AB.
kyang A : om. B.
bton B : ton A.
rdzong dkar B : rdzong khar A.
gyi zhal phye na sgrub em. : gyi zhal phye <nas> sgrub B : zhai phye nas bsgrub A.
gsung rob zhal dro compl. : gsung rab <zhal dro> A : abbr. gs+ya rabs zhal gru B. Note that in IDS. A
the place of insertion is marked with a cross and the insertion is to be found below line 7.
byin riabs compl. : abbr. byin+iabs B : byin briabs A.
ngo dro em. : ngo gro AB; sm. to kha dro po - kha dro ba dang 'dra, cf. note 1088.
phyogs byin chags pa 'i compl. : abbr. phyoD byin chaD'iB : abbr. phyog+s byin chag pa 'i A.
ngo ma em. : ngon po AB; Tashi Tsering: ngon po unknown; perh. excellent? Cf. Goldstein: dngui
ngan po- silver mixed! allyoed with other metals. Goldstein 2001, s.v. mngon 3. clear, clearly. Tshig
mdzod chen mo, s.v. ngo ma - rozun ma ma yin pa'i do bdag dngos, ... gser ngo ma.
hun A : 'unB; cf. pp.179, 247, 254.
bem A: abbr. speMB.
kyi 'but nodB: 'but nod A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. nod pa 2. (tmd.) myed pa'am thob pa. Cf.
pp. 158,160, 161, 173.
gis zhai tas em. : gis zhal itas B : abbr. abbr. gi zhal+tas A.
paA: om. B.
mdo sde B : abbr. mdoe A.
gsungscompl.: abbr. gsung+sA: abbr. gs+yaB.
dbus gtsang B : yang dbus Itsang A.
giegs em. : gieg AB; cf. A': giegs.
gio bur em. : bio bur du sgrub B : bio bu A; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.v. gio bur- sudden, suddenly.
baB :paA. .
gsung zhingcompl. : <gsung> zhing B : om. A.
sgrub B : bsgrub A.
Text Edition
175
dge rtsa
2457
bia med rdzogs pa'i
2458
byang chub tu bsngo ba yang rgya chen p02459 mdzad doll
bstan ' gyur bzhengs pa'i
2460
mgo tshugs pa tsam Ia! drung nas bia rna Sgrub
2461
pa dpalla bstan
, gyur , di bar chad med par 'grub par' dugl nga'i rmi lam du dbus gtsani
462
thams cad du thos
pa'i dung thengs bdun bUS
2463
pa rmis gsungs
2464
1
[2.11.49]
rwa sgreng du
2465
bzhugs dus mtshan lam du! chos rje bio bzani
466
pa dang gnyis gzhung lam
(37b) chen po gcig la! sangs rgyas su 'gro ba zer 'gro yin2467 'dug pasl blo bzang pa ca mgyogs
tsam ' gro yf468 , dugl khong lam na mchod rten gcig , dug pa Ia skor
469
ba byed cing , dugl ngas
rna byas (S337) par phyin pasl sangs rgyas pa yin zer ba'i khri chen po gcig 'dug pa der
2470
ngas
sngon Ia ' dzegsl khong gis kyang de rna khad la phebs bytmi
471
1 khong la khyed sangs rgya
2472
bar zhu byas pasl khong na rei bla rna byang chub sngon la mdzad par zhu zer nasi ngas sngon
la sangs rgyas pa rmisl khong bar skabs su skor ba byed pa de
2473
I rang don yid byed cig bytmg
ba yin nam
2474
snyam pa hytmg gsuni
475
I de la sogs pa'f476 ngo mtshar rmad du bytmg ba'i yon
tan mtha' yas soil
2457
2458
2459
2460
2461
2462
2463
2464
2465
2466
2467
2468
2469
2470
2471
2472
2473
2474
2475
2476
dge rtsa A :. dge ba 'i rtsa ba B.
Cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. bia na med pa - gong na med pa, ... bla na med pa yang dag par rdzogs
pa 'i byang chub.
yang rgya chen po A : abbr. rgya chenG yang B.
bzhengs pa'i A : bzhengs ba'iB.
sgmb B : bsgrub A.
gtsangem : gtsang <?> B : rtsang A.
thengs bdun bus B : theng bdun 'bus A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. thengs -ian nam, tshar. Tshig
mdzod chenmo, s.y. 'budpa- (td.) 2. buspa, 'budpa, bus 1) gtong ba,. .. dungbus te 'dzom brdagtong
ba, ... rgya giing 'bud pa.
gsungs compl. ; abbr. gs+ya B : gsung A.
rwa sgreng du em. ; ra grengs su AB.
bzang B : bzangs A.
sangs rgyas su 'gro ba yin zer yo yin em. : abbr. sar+ya m yo ba <zer 'gIo> yin A : abbr. sar+yas
m 'gIo rgyu yin zer yo yin B; cf. Bacot 655: sar+yas. Tashi Tsering: sangs rgyas su 'gIo ba sm. to
Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'tshang rgya ba - sangs rgyas pa'i ma 'ongs da ita gnyis. In ms. A the
place of insertion is marked with a cross; insertion below line 7.
ca mgyogs 'gro yi em. : abbr. <ca> 'gyog tsaM 'gIo yi A : abbr. ca 'gyoD byon kyi B; cf. Tshig
mdzod chen mo, s.y. mgyogs pa 2. myur ba.
skorB : bskor A; cf. notes 43,398,411,428, 1828,2000.
pa derA: om. B.
iaphebs byungB: phebs byon A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. demakhad-dema thag.
sangs rgya compl. : abbr. sar+ya A : abbr. sar+yas B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. rgya ba 1. (tmd.)
rgyas pa, rgya ba - mang du 'phd ba dang, Ije cher dar ba.
bar skabs su skor ba byed pa de em. : abbr. bar skabsu bskor ba byed pa de A : skor ba byed pa de bar
skabs su B; cf. note 2469.
cig byung ba yin nam compl. : abbr. 1 byzmg ba yinaMB : abbr. 1 (byed pa) byzmg ba yinaM A. Note
that in ms. A the ligature byed pa is deleted through crossing out.
snyam pa byung gsungcompl. : abbr. snyaM pa byung gsung A : abbr. snyaM <pa byung gsung> B.
pa'iA :paB.
176 Chapter 5
[2.12 Verse 12]
[12] gangs ri'i khrod kyi che btsun 'byor 1dan gyis/
gus pas spyan drangs myed dang bskur stis mchodl
dbang bskur sems' bskyed
2477
gdams pa2478 mang du zhus/
kun gyis2479 mchod 'os khyod
2480
1a phyag 'tshal10//
[2.12.1]
zhes pa ni
2481
rigs dang gtong ba
2482
1a sogs (750) pa mtho ris kyi yon tan bdun gyig2483 mngon par
mtho ba 'jam dbyangs nam mkha' rin chen pas/ bdag nyin chen po mkhas pa'i grags pa thob
nas
2484
'chad nyan mdzad pa'i dus su dpon slob mams yang yang btegl gsung2485 sgros rnang po
bzhengs nasi blo gsal mams la gnang / bzhengs
2486
mkhan mams la yang snag shog sogs chas
ka
2487
mang po gnang / gsung2488 sgros la 'chad nyan mdzad pa mams kyi bdag rkyen2489 yang
dag pa mdzadl bul rong du phyags phebs man chacf
490
kyangl phyogs nas ' dus pa'i bya bral ba
gang byung2491 mams bteg2
492
1 bkren
2493
pa mams la ci 'dod kyi gsung2494 sgros mams bris nas
gnang ba sogs bshad Sgrub
2495
mdzad pa'i zhabs tog yang dag pa(380) mdzad pas nal sbyin bdag
mams kyi gtso bo yin noll
[2.12.2]
rigs dang rus dang! cho 'brang2496 gis (S338) mngon par mtho ba khri rgyal bsod nams Ide pa yab
yum gyis dpon slob gang yod 10 gnyis kyi
2497
bar du btegl mnga' ris su chos kyi 'khor 10
2477
2478
2479
2480
2481
2482
2483
2484
2485
2486
2487
2488
2489
2490
2491
2492
2493
2494
2495
2496
2497
bskycdcompl.: <b>skycdA: skycdB.
gdams pa compl. : abbr. gdaMs pa B : gdams <pa> A; cf. yerse 12c aboye, p. 70.
kungyiscompl.: abbr. kun+yisB: kungyiA; cf. p. 70, Yerse 12.
khyodB : khycd A.
zhcspaniB: ecspa'iA.
baB :paA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. gtong ba2. sbyinpa.
bdun gyis em. : bdun gyi A : gyis B.
grags pa thob nas compl. : abbr. graD pa thob nas B : abbr. grag+s pa thob nasu A.
gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
bzhcngs A : bzhcng B.
kaB: khaA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. chaska 2) rgyu eha dangyo byad
gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
rkycnB: brkycnA; cf. Tshigmdzodchenmo, S.Y. rkycn bzhi2) rgyu'irkycn dang, dcma thagrkycn,
dmigs rkycn, bdag rkyCD tc bzhi.
man chad em. : mar bead AB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. phyag phcbs - phyags phcbs dang don
gcig,'Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. phyags phcbs 1) 'ong ba, 2) slcbs pa 'am 'byor ba. .
'duspa'i bya braJ bagang byungA: byung ba'i bya braJ baB.
$ccnote 2388.
bkrcnA: bsk:rcnB; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.y. bk:rcnpa 1) normcd dbulphongs.
gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
sgrub B : bsgrub A:
'brangB: 'phrangA; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, S.Y. eho 'brang-ma'irigs.
kyiB :gyiA.
L
. Text Edition
177
bskor
498
ba'i bdag rkyen2499 yang mdzad cing I dpon slob mams la 'bu1 nod
25OO
phun sum tshogs
. pa mdzad nasi mi phyed pa'i dad pa thob pas na sbyin bdag gi2501 mchog yin noll
[2.12.3]
sne'u
2502
pas dpon slob 'khor bcas dga' ba gdong dang I rwa2
503
sgreng du nam bzhugs bar bteg
cing I 'bu1 nod rgya chen po yang mdzadl .
[2.12.4]
dpon yon tan rgya mtshos gnam rtse ldeng du bzhugs dusj2504 rgyags 'khor mar
505
bteg cing I
'bul nod phun sum tshogs pa yang mdzad [B: do!]1
[2.12.5]
gling dkar basi yar mar gyi zhabs tog 'bu1 nod [B: dang] bcas pa yang bsgrubsj2506 gnas
myini
507
stong dpon rgyal mtshan bzang pos 'chad nyan mdzad dusl (75b) dpon slob mams kyi
, chad
2508
nyan gyi bdag rkyen yang dag pa mdzadl 'bri khung [B: pa] chen po shes rab dpal basi
na
2509
bza' ja dkar rdzii
510
chen la sogs [B: pal 'bu1 nod rgya chen po bsgrubg251l1 slob dpon
seng ge bzang pos kyani
512
nas khal
2513
brgya phu1 nasi slob dpon
2514
mams bteg! chu ' dus pas
spyan drangs nasi chos 'khor bskor ba'f515 bdag rkyen 'bul nod
2516
yang dag pa
2517
mdzadl
shrl
2518
ri ' dzam bu gling du [B: bla ma] bsod nams ' od zer bas
2519
I dpon slob mams kyi2520 dbyar
rgyags bteg nas chos 'khor bskor
521
1 mang yu1 seng ge mkhar du dpon po bsod n ~ 5 2 2 [B: dge
2498
2499
2500
250!
2502
2503
2504
250S
250.
2507
2508
2509
2510
2511
2512
2513
2514
2515
2516
2517
2518
2519
2520
2521
2522
bskorA: skorB. Sccnotes 398,1179,2093,2129.
bdag rkycn B : bdag rkycn mams A. Note that in ms. A mams is circled by dots.
nodB : snod A.
na sbyin bdag gi compl. : abbr. na sbyin bdagiB : <na> sbyin <bdag> gi A.
snc'u em. : snc B : snel A.
gdong dang rwa A : sdong dang ra B; cf. p. 154.
bzhugs dus A: abbr. bzhuDB.
rgyags 'khor marem. : rgyag 'khor mar A : abbr. rgyaD 'khor bcas B.
bsgrubs A : sgrubs B.
myingB: snyingA. Cf. note 1 2 1 ~
'chadB : bshad A.
naA: abbr. naMB.
rdzigem. : sig AB; cf. Goldstein 200 I: rdzig po 2. grand, imposing.
bsgrubs A : sgrubs B.
kyang B : om. A.
khal A : <m>khalB.
slob dpon compl. : abbr.: slaun A : dpon slob B.
bskor ba'i A : skor'iB.
nodB : snod A.
paA:om.B.
shrI em. : shri AB.
basA: baB.
kyiA :om.B.
bskor A : skor B.
bsodnamscompl.: abbr. bsodMsB: abbr. bsodMA.
178 Chapter 5
, dun] grub
2523
kyis dpon slob 'khor bcas zla gcig bteg nas chos 'khor bskoi
524
1 Ian lde
2525
gung
stings su blama 'jam dpal (38b) gling pa lcam sring gis dpon slob sum brgyi
526
tsam zla ba gsum
gyi bar (8339) du btegl drung du yang na bza,
2527
Ia sogs 'bul nod phun sum tshogs pa dang I oya
bral ba mams Ia'ang na bza,2528 re phuII stag rtse bas dmu rdzini
529
du chos 'khor bskoi
530
ba'i
bdag rkyen dangl yar mar gyi dpon slob mams kyi zhabs tog 'bul nod dang bcas pa mdzad!
khyad par khong
2531
rang grongs
2532
dusl thugs dam 'dogs
2533
thig po zho drug CU
2534
rtsa drug
sgor mo2535 gcig phuII bya bral ba mams la'ani
536
'gyed dang bcas pa bsgrubs
2537
1 druni
538
a
phyi2539 ba dangl dpon zhang kun spangs pas 'bul 'degs bzang po mdzad! khyad par [B: du]
drung slob dpon mas zhabs tog mthil du zhugs nas
2540
yang dag pa mdzad! shes rab
2541
pa sku
mched pas kyang zhabs tog phun sum tshogs pa mdzad! gzhan yang mnga' ris kyi dpon
2542
rigs
'byor ldan dad pa can mams kyis
2543
zhabs tog yang dag pa bsgrubs
2544
1 drung nas kyang dbus
gtsani
545
gi sbyin bdag de mams thams cad la dbang bskurl sems bskyed
2546
lung khrid la sogs
(76a) gang la gang 'os kyi chcis kyi 'breI ba
2547
gnang nasi dal
2548
'byor thob pa don dang ldan
pai
549
mdzad pasl sangs rgyas dngos Ita bur mi phyed pa'i dad pa thob nasi gangs can gyi skye
bo phal mo che'i 'dren pa dam par gyur toll
2523
2524
2525
2526
2527
2528
2529
2530
2531
2532
2533
2534
2535
2536
2537
2538
2539
2540
2541
2542
2543
2544
2545
2546
2547
2548
2549
grub A : abbr. dgreub B.
bskor A : skor B.
/deB: 'deA; cf. Goldstein 2001, s.v. 'de sm. /de.
brgya em. : rgya A : cu B.
du yang na bza'A : abbr. nas naM bza<'> B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. na bza' - gas kyi zhe sa.
/a yang na bza' B : /a 'ang na za A.
dmurdzingB: smurdzingA.
bskorA: skorB; cf. note?
khong A : kho B. Here in ms. A p. 75b5 the whole line 75b7 <khyad par khong ... bzang po mdzad>
(beginning marked with a svastika) is to be inserted here. Ms. B incorporates it in its flowing text.
grongs B : grong A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'grongs pa (tmd.) grongs pa, pangs pa - 'chi ba.
'dogs B : 'dog A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. 'dogs pa (td.) btags pa, gdags pa, fhogs - 'ching
ba, ... thugs /a 'dogs pa.
cuB: bcuA.
sgormoem.: 'gorbaAB.
/a'angA: /ayangB.
bsgmbs compl. : abbr. bsgrub+s A : sgrubs B.
Cf. note 964.
phyiA :phiB.
mfhi/ du zhugs nasem. : abbr. togi 'fhi/ du zhug<s> nas A: abbr. tog '!hl] zhuDB.
shes mbA: abbr. {sh}erB.
dpon A : slob B.
dad pa can mams kyis compl. : ab br. <dad pa can> maMs kyis A : abbr. dad pa can maMs+yiB.
yang dag pa bsgrubs A : abbr. yangg sgmbs B.
nas kyang dbus gtsang compl. : nas <kyang> dbus gtsang B : gnas kyang dbus rtsang A.
bskyed A : skyedB.
baA :paB. .
da/B: darA.
/danparcompl. : abbr. /danrB : /danpaA.
Text Edition
179
kun mkhyen shes rab
2550
'od la sogs pa mdo khams kyi bu slob mams dang Ibka' beu pa kun
dga' dpalla sogs pa dbus gtsang2551 gi bu slob mams kyis kyang2552 'byor ba
2553
dang stun nas
2554
gus pas mehod doll .
[2.12.6]
gzhan yang gnam gyi mtha' ma rgya nag po'i yu1 nasi [B: !]2555 ta ming rgyal pos gan2556 gos
bzang po phyi nang lnga! (39a) snam sbyar bzang pol sku 'gag ber thul (8340) thung rini
557
I dbu
thebl [B: zhabs] lham! sku sked
2558
1 phyag phreng I rdor dril
2559
eha gnyisl ting shags2560 eha
gnyisl rten khebs gnyisl gan dkar gnyisl gsol khebs gcigl m a w ~ a l a gyi rgyan gsum! tsan dan
2561
dkai po dum
2562
gcigl ja dkar2
563
rgya ma lnga beu mams phul/ gu ge rgyal posl kha ehe
2564
gur
gum2565 zho lnga beus
2566
mgo
2567
byas 'bul nod mang du byung ngoll
[2.13 Verse 13]
[13] 'brug gi
2568
10 la my a ngan 'da' dgongs nasi
go rtogs nyams su myong ba'i zab don mams!
bston
2569
pas bstan pa gtOd
2570
pa ji bzhin du!
chos 'khor nan ' doms khyod la phyag 'tshallo! I
2550
2551
2552
2553
2554
2555
2556
2557
2558
2559
2560
2561
2562
2563
2564
2565
2566
2567
2568
2569
2570
shes rab campI. : abbr. sher B : shes {--} A.
gtsang B : rtsang A.
kyis kyang B : kyi <kyang> A.
baem. :paAB.
stun nas em. : abbr. btuns AB.
Special shad Different from the sbrul shad above, cf note 1010.
ganA: am. B; cf Tshigmdzod chen rna, s.v. gan dar-goschengyirigsshig;cf. note 2433, 2444.
thung ringem. : thong rings A: thongs rings B; cf notes 2433, 2444.
sku sked em. : skyeg A : abbr. skyeD B; Tashi Tsering: sku sked = zhe sa of ske rags; cf. Tshig mdzod
chen rna, s.v. sked rags - sked pa 'ching byed
driIB: driA.
shagsem.: shagAB; cf Tshigmdzod chenmo, s.v. tingshags-rol mo'i bye bragcig.
tsan dan compI. : abbr. tsan+dan B : abbr. tsan+da A. Note that in ms. A the d is actually subscribed
between ts and n.
dum campI. : abbr. duMB: abbr. gduM A; cf Tshig mdzod chen mo, s. v. dum gcig - dum bu gcig ste
chashas. .
See section 2.12.5.
che A : phye B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, illuminator, s.v. gur gum, kha che gur gum. MW, s.v.
Ianikuma.
gur gum campI. : abbr. gur guMB : abbr. gurM A.
bcusB: bcu'iA.
Shes bya 'i gter mdzod317.34 replaces bcus mgo byaswith bcu 'i gtsor byas.
giB :gisA.
bston A : ston B.
gtod A : bstodB; cf verse 13 above.
180 Chapter 5
[2.13.1]
zhes
2571
pa nil mang gung gi mtshams glini572 rtse dpal gyi dben gnas sui 'brug gi 10 la
2573
dge
'dun brgya phrag cii
574
la chos kyi 'khor 10 bskorba'i dus sui de
2575
10 my a ngan las 'da' bar
2576
mkhyen nasi dguni
577
10 drug CU2578 rtsa lnga'i bar dU
2579
thos bsam sgom2580 gsum gyis rgyal ba
sras dang slob mar bcas pa thams cad kyi dgongs pa zab mo phyin ci rna loi
58
! pa rtogs shingl
thugs nyams su bzhes pa'i don mams ston pa bcom ldan 'das kyis 'od sruni
582
chen po (76b)
dangl kun dga' bo la sogs2583 la nga'i mdo sde rin po che 'di khyed la gtod
2584
I khyed mams kyis
zung zhii
585
1 chongs shigl kloi
586
shigl kun chub par gyis shigl gzhan [B: dag] la yang gya
cher ston gcig ces yang dang yang du gsungs pa bzhin dul bdag nyid chen po 'dis kyang I gdul
bya'i tha rna mams la gsang 'dus rim lnga'i khridllta khrid tshar gnyisl 'jug pa tshar gsum
bstud
2587
nas gsungsl rtsa ba tshar gcig rgyas par gsungsl (39b) smon 'jug gi sems
2588
bskyed Ian
(8341) gnyis nyin gcig la gsungsl gsang 'dus kyi dbang thengs gnyis gnang I lee sgom rdzong
ba'i2589 man ngag rin spungs kyi lung gnang I bya bral ba mams kyis 10 mang po'i bar du gsol
2571
2572
2573
2574
2575
2576
2577
2578
2579
2580
2581
2582
2583
2584
2585
2586
2587
2588
2589
zhesB: cesA.
mtshains gling A: abbr. 'tshaMs bleng B. Las chen: glong, see 1) 158b2, 2) 311a3, 3) 615.20. Ye shes
rgyal mtshan 903.11: klong rtse bsam gtan gling.
Las chen: ehu pho 'brug gi lola, see 1) 158b2, 2) 3IIa3, 3) 615.20.
eig compI. : abbr. I A : phyed 2 B. Las chen: brgya phrag phyed dang gnyis, see 1) 158b2, 2) 311a4,
3) 615.21. Ye shes rgyal mtshan 903.11: brgya dang Inga beu skor.
bskorba'idussudeem.: abbr. skor'idusudeB: bskorba'idusdude'iA.
barB: baA.
dgllI1g B : gung A; cf. liischke 1881: dgllI1g 5. before dates, esp. before the word 10, it serves as a re-
spectful word, and is e.g. frq. used in stating the age of a Buddha or a king.
euem.: beuAB.
Ye shes rgyal mtshan 903.15-16: here differently says dgung 10 re bzhi pa ehu pho 'brug gi 10 zla ba
beu gnyis pa 'i nyer dgu'i nyin my a ngan las 'da' ba'i tshu! bstan, while both mss. AB state dgllI1g 10
drug eu rtsalnga 'i bardu and further down (see note 2723) 'brug 10 zla ba beupa'i nyerdgu'i nyi shar
la. Ye shes rgyal mtshan agrees with Las chen 1) 159a5 abbr.10 re bzhipa chu pho 'brug gi 10 zla ba
beuis pa'i nyerdgu'i nyi shar, cf. 2) 311b3, 3) 616.19. We cannot rule out that Las chen had access to
a third manuscript of Sangs rgyas ltse mo, which carries the abbr. beuis = beu gnyis, while the scribe
of mss. AB missed the gi gu vowel sign. But this would not explain the different year of birth and age
at death. Note: ming mdzodp. 1620.6-7 dgllI1g 10 drug eu re bzhi par dgongs pa ehos dbyings su
gshegs agrees with Ye shes rgyal mtshan's re bzhi mentoned above. Also the date of birth in ming
mdzodp. 1619.7-10 Tab bYllIlg drug pa 'i sa mo glang 10 ste spyi 10 134910r (..) 'kbrungs, rab bYllIlg
bdllI1pa'i ehupho 'brug 10 ste spyi 10 141210rsku gshegsagrees with Ye shes rgyal mtshan 892.1 sa
mo glang 1a sku 'khrungs. Different Shes bya 'igter mdzod317.36: drug eu rtsa 1nga.
sgom B : bsgom A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. thos bsam sgom gsum.
log B : logs A; cf. liischke 1881: phyin ci log
snmgem.: bsnmgsAB.
1a sogscompl. : abbr.1aswoA: abbr. soDB.
gtod A : btodB.
mams kyis ZllIlg zhigem. : abbr. maMs+yis zllng shig B : abbr. maMs kyi Zllng shig A.
ldog em. : 1hogs A : abbr. 1hoD B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. ldog pa - (td.) bldags pa, bldag pa,
k10gs - yi ge 'don pa.
bstudem. : btudAB; Tashi Tsering: sm. to mu mthud nas;cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.V. studpa(td.)
bstud pa, bstud pa, stud - rgYllIl mi 'chad par byed pa, ... 'phnn bzang rgyun mi 'chad par bstud nas
thos byung.
semscompl.: abbr. seMsA: abbr. thuDB.
sgom rdzong ba'iem. : abbr. sgoM rdzongpa'iB : abbr. bsgoM rdzongpa'iA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen
mo, s.v. rdzong ba.
L
Text Edition
181
ba btab kyang rna gnang ba'i gsung rab
2590
tharns cad kyi snying po bsdus pa bka' 'bum thor bu
ba'i lung mams
2591
gnang I sngar nas gsungs pa dang rni 'drabar dka' ba'i gnad
2592
mams Ian
gnyis Ian gsum du nas gsungsl de ltar nges par gyis zhig ces yang yang du gsungs
2594
zhingl khyad par du 'phags pa klu sgrub kyi lugs kha na rna mtho ba med pa ' di la rna brten par
'tshang rgya
2595
mi nus par khas len e nusl zhes chos mgo gzhui
596
la Ian gnyis gsum gsungs
kyang I Ian zhu mkhan rna byung 'dugl bdag nyid chen po'i bzhed pas 'tshang rgyit
2597
ba'i
thabs rdo rje thei
598
pa dang I phar phyin theg pa gnyis las rna gsungs shing I de gnyis kyi lam
gyi gtso bo yang rdzogs
2599
rim dang lta ba mam [B: dag] gnyis yin la/ de gnyis kyang ming tha
dad kyis bstan pa tsam rna gtogs
2600
ngo bo bdag med rtogs pa,?601 shes rab kho na yin! des rtogs
pa'i gnas [B: lugs] kyi don de las gnas lugs kyi don gzhan
2602
dus gsum gyi sangs rgyas kyis rna
gsungs shing I de phyin ci rna log pari 'phags pa klu (77a) sgrub kyi
2603
bstan pa ' di kho na yin
snyam du dgongs pa yin [B: no/]1
'phags pa klu sgrub zhabs kyi lugs
2604
las nil
phyi rol gyur la zhi ba'i thabs med do/;2605
zhes pas
2606
gzhung 'jug mdzad pa yin noll
2590
2591
2592
259]
2594
2595
2596
2597
2598
2599
2600
2601
2602
26Q3
2604
2605
2606
2607
ba'i gsung rab em. : abbr. ba 'i gs+ya rabs B : pa 'i gsungs rab A; cf. Iiischke 1881: gsung, compo gsung
rab.
mamscompl.: abbr. maMsA: yangB.
gsungs pa dang mi 'dra bar dka' ba 'i gnad em. : gsungs pa dang mi 'dra bar dka' ba 'i gnas A : abbr.
gs+ya ba dang mi 'dJa ba 'i dka' ba 'i gnas B.
Ian gnyis Ian gsum du bskyarem. : abbr. Ian 2 Ian 3 du skyarB : abbr. Ian 2 3 bskyar A; cf. Tsbig
mdzod chen rna, s. v. bskyar ba - yang yang ldab pa 'i don du go ba 'i skyor ba 'i 'das pa dang ma 'ongs
pa.
du gsungs campI. : abbr. du gs+ya B : gsung A.
brten par 'tshang rgya em. : rten par 'tshang rgya B : abbr. brten par sar+ya A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen
rna, s.v. rtenpa(tmd.) brtenpa, brtenpa, rten.
mgo gzhugem. : mgo bzhug A: 'go 'jug B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. mgo gzhug - gong 'og
dang snga phyi
'tshang rgya B : abbr. sar+ya A.
theg B : thegs A.
rdzogscompl.: abbr. rdzoDE: rdzogA.
gtogsem.: gtogA: abbr. rtoDB.
rtogspa'icompl.: abbr. rtoD'iB :pa'iA.
gzhan B : bzhan A.
kyiB : kyis A.
lugs campI. : abbr.lug+s A : lu<gs> B.
Citation from dEu ma la 'jug pa, chapter 6, D3861, vol. 'a, p. 208al-2: slob dpon kIu sgrub zhabs kyi
lam las ni, phyi ral gyur Ia zhi ba'i thabs med do. Same in 'Jug pa'i mam bshad(1995: 179.12-13).
English translation in: Tsering and Stiiter-Tillmann (1997: 188): MMA B6LIX, 1-2. Cf. note 2623.
zhespasem.: cespasA: zhes'iB.
'jug parcompl. : abbr. 'jugr B : abbr. 'jug+s par A.
182 Chapter 5
[2.13.2]
dbang gnani
608
dus dang I dbu ma'i skabs 'ga' yar
609
du spyan chab yang yang gtong ba'i rgyu
mtshannil chos (8342) dang chos smra ba'i gang zag la dad cing gus pa(40a) skyes pa'i! ngas klu
sgrub kyi2610 Ita ba bzang po 'di bstan kyani
611
1 dad pa tsam ma gtogs
2612
phyin ci [B: mal log
par go ba ma byung bar
613
I gdul bya la thugs chad nas zer 10 bgyid
2614
dang I go ba mi go gsung
ba
2615
dang I ye gsang chen mor
616
'dug gi gsungs
2617
zhing I zab mo Ita ba'i bstan pa nub' gro
bar gzigs tel thugs
2618
mug nas bshums par yang go'0
2619
11
[2.14 Verse 14]
[14] 'khor ' das chos kun skye ba med bstan nafl-
620
I
de nyid ngang 1a my a ngan 'da' bzhed na'ang /
gus pas gs01 btab ngo ru zhag bdun barl
sku tshe byin brlabs khyod la phyag 'tshallol/
zhes pa ni
2621
I gang tshe skye med de nyid
2622
yin zhing blo yani
623
skye ba dang bral bal zhes
pa'i skabs su yul yul can gyr
624
bsdus pa'i
2625
'khor 'das kyi chos tharns cad skye ba med par
bstan tef626 rang nyid kyang chos kyi dbyings su my a ngan las 'da,2627 bar bshed nas snyuni
628
ba'i tshul bstan na yang I gdul bya mams kyifl-
629
my a ngan las mi ' da' bar gsol ba btab pa'i
ngorl zhag bdun gyi bar [B: du] sku tshe [B: gyi] byin gyis brlabs
2630
nas sku kharns dwangs
pa
2631
tel da lo'i chos 'di bar chad kyang mang ba
2632
gcig byung basi grol ba'i rigs mi 'dug
2608
260,
2610
2611
2612
2613
2614
2615
2616
2617
2618
26}9
2620
2621
2622
2623
2624
2625
2626
2627
2628
2629
2630
2631
2632
gnang B : gna<ng> A.
Cf. note 1700.
kyiB :gyiA.
bzang po 'di bstan kyang A : zab mo 'di bstan pa dang B.
gtogscompl.: abbr. gtoDA: abbr. rtoDB.
ma byungbarem.: ma byungparA: abbr. tsaMma byungbarB.
bgyid em. : gyis AB. cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. bgyid pa (td.) bgyis pa, bgyi ba, gyis - byed pa.
gSlPlg ba compl. : abbr. gs+ya ba B : gsung pa A.
Perh. g.yeng zang chen mor; Tashi Tsering: Colloqiual phrase, not sure about spelling. Cf. Goldstein
2001, s.v. g.yeng ba chen po. Perh. not gsang, but zanglike in Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. zang ngi
zingngfl
gsungscoml?l.: abbr. gs+yaB: gsungA.
thugscompl.: abbr. thug+sA: thugB.
yanggo'oB: gomoA.
bstan nas compl. : abbr. bstans B : abbr. drans A; cf. above p. 71 verse 14.
zhes pa niB: ces dang A.
skye med de nyidB : de nyid skye moo A.
yang B : dang A. Regarding the source see note to English translation.
yu1 yu1 can gyi compl. : abbr. yu1 yun gyi A : abbr. yul yu1 can+yiB.
pa'iB :paA.
feB: foA.
my a ngan las 'da'compl.: abbr. my an las 'da'B: my a ngan Jas 'dasA.
snyungB: bsnyungA; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. snyungba2.(tmd.) bsnyungspa, bsnyung ba-
na ba 'i zhe sa.
kyisern. :J(yi AB; cf. Las chen: kyis, see 1) l58b4, 2) 311a5, 3) 616.3.
brlabsA: rlabsB.
dwangs pa em. : dangs pa B : abbr. dang+s A.
baB :paA.
Text Edition
183
,gsungs2633 nasi [B: rim lnga Ita khrid legs pa'i] dmigi
634
pa [B: gnyis gsum] sprugs kyi.if635
gnang [B: zhing] I 'jug pa'i bshad pa yang grol barmdzad doll
[2.15 Verse 15]
[15] 'chi ba 'od gsallus la brten
2636
mi srid/
Ius sems bral (77b) nas mams shes stong par zhugsl
dbyings rig dbyer med ' od gsal yin no zhesl
yang yang gsungs pa
2637
khyod la phyag 'tshallol/
zhe;; panf638 ding sang (40b) gi manngag pa phal chef2
639
nyerthob mun chen gyi gnas skabs su
zhi gnas kyimthus (8343) sems Ius layunring du gnas pa lal 'chi ba 'od gsal du 'dodna'ang I de
'dra mdo rgyud kyi dgongs pa ma yin/Ius sems bral nas [B: mam shes] stong chen choskyi
dbyings su zhugs nasi dbyings rig dbyer med du ' gyur ba
2640
lal [B: bar 'dir dpe cha'i shog bu guy;. ma
tshangl]2641 'chi ba 'odgsal zhes zerba yin!'di ltarbshadnamang po gcig dgraru 'gro ste/'di mi
zer kha med yin pasl thams cad kyis2642 yid la zung zhig2
643
1 ces mang du gsung ngoll
[2.16 Verse 16]
[16] sngar bsgoms
2644
'pho ba'i man ngag gsal btab nasi
rtags
264S
mams ma rjed dga' sproi
646
'od gsal 'jug!
'gog las
2647
1dang zhing sngon gyi2648 'phen pas 'phol
gsung bzhin
2649
mdzad pa khyod la phyag 'tshallol1
zhes
2650
pa'di ding sang 'chi tsana
2651
'pho ba 'debs zerba'i lag len zhig dar 'dugna'ang I phyi
dbugi
652
rna chad pa la' debs pa yin! phyi dbugi653 chad nas btab kyang thos pa'i go skabs med
de'ang I sngar 'pho ba'i gnad man ngag sgom myong naJ mi gsal ba gsal bar byed pa la gzhan
2633
2634
2635
263.
2637
2638
263"
2640
2641
2642
2643
2644
2645
264.
2641
2648
264"
2650
2651
2652
2653
'duggsungscompl.: abbr. 'duggs+yaB: abbr. 'dugsungA.
dmigscompl.: abbr. dmiDB: dmigA.
sprogs kyin compl. : abbr. sproD kyin B : sprongs nas A.
brtcn B : rten A.
gsungs pa compl. : abbr. gs+ya pa B : abbr. gsung+s ba A.
zhes pa niB: ces pa 'di A.
phal cher B : phar cher A.
'gyur ba em. : (-}gyur ba A: gyur pa B.
Ms. B omits here from 40b2 onwards two sheets (folios).
kyis em. : kyi A.
zungzhigem.: zungcigA.
bsgomsem. : abbr. sgoM<s> A; cf. p. 71, verse 16.
rtags em. : rtag A.
sproscompl.: spro<s>A.
las em. : la A.
gyicompl.: gyi{<s>}A.
bzhin em. : zhing A.
zhes em. : ces A.
'chi tsa na em. : gi 'chi rtsa na A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. tsa na 2) dus su'am skabs suo
dbugs em. : dbug A.
dbugs em. : dbug A.
184 Chapter 5
gyis 'pho ba 'debs pa yin! man ngag ma thob pa'i skye bo tha mal pa la 'pho ba'i man ngag
bstan kyang kho la ci yang mi phan pai
654
1 mtshan dang I gzungs byin rlabs
2655
can brjod pa don
chel man ngag dang ldan pa 'chi ba'i tshel sngar rang gis bsgoms
2656
pa'i 'pho ba'i man ngag
mams legs par gsal btab nasi nga 'di 'dra gcig tu skye
2657
na snyam pa'i (78.) 'phen pa drag tu
sngon dli btang nasi 'byung ba bzhi thim pa'i rtags dang I snang ba gsum shar ba'i rtags
2658
mams ma brjed par byas nasi rtags
2659
mams rdzogs pa dang I da nga ' od (S344) gsal don dam pa'i
bden pa mngon sum du byed pa 'dug snyams pa'i dga' spro cher skye zhing I pha khyim du bu
, gro ba ltar brad pa dang bcas nasi chos kyi dbyings la zhugs
2660
pa la 'chi ba ' od gsal mngon du
byas pa zer ba yin! de'i ngang la 'pho ba'i mam rtog med kyang I sngon
2661
gyi 'phen pa'i dbang
gis gang 'dod pa'i skye
2662
gnas su 'phen nus pa la 'pho ba 'debs
2663
pa zer ba yin! nyan thos
mams 'gog pa la snyoms
2664
par 'jug pa'i tshel zhag dang zla ba dang 10 'di tsam gyi bar du
snyoms
2665
par 'jug cing I snyoms 'jug gi ngang las ldang ba'i ' du shes med kyang sngon gyi
'phen pa'i dbang gis dus las mi ' da' bar ldang ba yin! dper na gnyid log pa'i sngon la nang par
snga mor ldang snyam pa'i
2666
'phen pa btang nas nyal basi gnyid kyi ngang la ldang ba'i blo
med kyang I 'phen pas snga mor gnyid
2667
sad pa bzhin noll
zhes gsung zhini
668
1 ji Itar gsung ba bzhin du my a ngan las 'da' ba'i dus su yang mngon du
mdzaddoll
[2.17 Verse 17]
[17] sku tshe 'di yi2669 dngos kyi gdul bya la1
zab rgyas chos kyi 'khor 10 bskor zin nasi
'chi ba 'od gsa! skabs su gzhan don gshegsl
skye 'chi dbang thob khyod la phyag 'tshallol1
2654
2655
2650
2657
2658
2659
2060
2661
2662
2663
2664
2665
2666
2667
2668.
2669
pas em. : {-} bas A.
rlabs em. : brlabs A; cf. note 71.
bsgomscomp!.: abbr. <b>sgom+sA.
sAye em. : skyes A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. sAye ba 1. (tmd.) sAyes pa, skye ba 1) sngar moo
gsar du 'byrmg ba.
rtags em. : rtag A.
rtags em. : rtag A.
zhugs em. : zhug A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. 'jug pa 2. (tmd.) zhugs pa, 'jug pa, zhugs - des su
'brang ba dang 'gIo ba.
sngon em. : mngon A; cf. p. 71, verse 16.
skyeem.; sAyesA; cf. liischke 1881: skyeba, camp. skyegnasl. birthplace.
'debsem. : thebsA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. 'pho ba 'debspa -gshinpo'i maw shes dagzhing
dusporba.
'gog pa 1a snyoms em.: 'gogs pa 1a snyom A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. 'gog pa 'i snyoms 'jug.
snyomsem.: abbr. snyoMA.
snyawpa'i em. : abbr. mnyaMpa'i A.
gnyid camp!. : <i>nyid A.
gsung zhing A.
diyjem.: 'dj'iA; cf.p.71.
Text Edition
185
zhes
2670
pa nil gong du bstan pa de ltar [dngos ]2671 gyi gdul bya'i tshogs
2672
marns lal rang rang
gi skal ba dang 'tsharns
2673
par zab pa don dam bden pa dang I rgya che ba kun rdzob kyi bden
pa gnyis kyi sgo nas thar pa dang thams cad mkhyen pa thob pa'i thabs chos kyi 'khor 10 ma Ius
pa bskor zin nasi rang nyid (78b) my a ngan las' das pa
2674
la 'jigs pa dang I ya nga ba dang I bag
tsha ba rni mnga,2675 ba yin (S345) tel slob dpon sangs rgyas dpal gyi Sgrub
2676
chen manarel tshe
Sgrub
2677
rna mdzad na sku tshe thung zer gda' lagsl tshe Sgrub
2678
rndzad na zhuspasl drug
CU
2679
kha ral gyi
2680
dus sui drug CU
2681
rtsa lnga
2682
song 'dugl de tshe ring ba'i rten 'breI rni
sgrig gsung ba dangl snyung ba ldogpa'i sngadro blamargyal bzang gis phyagphulnasl drung
nas bstan pa dang I sems can gyi don la zhabs brtan par bzhugs su gsoll zhes zhus pasl da na ba
yun thung ba dang I ' chi ba zug chung ba 'byuni
683
na bsam pa ma gtogs
2684
bya ba ' di rang ma
'gmb snyarn pa'i blo'i lhag rna Ius pa med gsuni
685
nasi
[2.17.1]
(1) gang la skyabs na bslu rned dkon rnchog gsuml
'bral med spyi gtsut
686
rgyan du rtag bzhugs gsolj2687
snang stong sgyu rna'i mal 'byor ri khrod pal
sems gnong
2688
rned kyi glu skad ' di bzhin len!
(2) shul na 'phreng ba'i
2689
zas nor Ius pa rnedl
gdong na rntsher
690
ba'i las ngan (M 10a1) bsags
2691
pa medl
2670
2671
2672
2673
2674
2675
2676
2617
2678
2679
2680
2681
2682
2683
2684
2685
2686
2687
2688
2689
2690
2691
zhes em. : ces A.
dngosem. : om. A; cf. Las chen: dngos, see 1) IS8bS, 2) 311a6, 3) 616.5.
tshogs em. : abbr. tshoDs A.
'tshams em. : abbr. 'tshaM A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. de dang 'tshams pa - de dang phan tShUIl
mthUIl zhing ran pa.
paem.: baA.
mi mnga' compl. : abbr. minga' A.
sgrub em. : bsgrub A.
sgrub em. : bsgmb A.
gda ' lags tshe sgmb em. : brda' lags tshe bsgrubs A; cf. note 2027.
cu em. : bcu A.
gyiem.: gyis A; cf. Las chen: gyi, see 1) IS9a2, 2) 311b2, 3) 616.12.
cu em. : bcu A.
Las chen: bzhi, see 1) IS9a2, 2) 311b2, 3) 616.l3.
'byungem.: byungA.
gtogsem. : gtogA; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.y. magtogs.
blo 'i lhag ma Ius pa med gSUIlg compl. : bio'i {thag} lhag ma <lus> pa med gsung A. Note that in ms.
A the ligature thagis marked by dots on top, while in ms. B this part of the text is missing.
gtsug AR : btsug M.
rgyan du rtag bzhugs gsolR : abbr. rgyan du rtag bzhugsolM : abbr. rgyaIl du bzhugsuol A.
gnong R : lTlong M : snong A.
'phreng ba 'i A: 'phreng pa 'iM: 'phrengs pa 'iR.
mtsherR: 'tsherAM; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'tsherba(tmd.) 3) mtsherba dang don gcig
bsagsMR: b{-}sagA.
186
Chapter 5
theg chen bslab pa'i bsam sbyor nyams
2692
pa med/
da
2693
sgyu ma'i Ius serns 'bra1
2694
yang 'gyod pa med/
Here M10al-2 has verse 3 that is left out in manuscriptA.
2695
(4) cir
696
snang sgyu mar rtogs2697 pa'i shes rab YOd/
'gro drug pha mar shes pa'i lhag bsam yod/
thabs
2698
shes zung du 'breI ba,?699 nyams len yod/
da
2700
sgyu ma'i Ius serns 'braI yang' gyod pa med/
(5) thog mar gsung rab
270
! dgongs2702 don tshul bzhin sbyangs
2703
/
bar du b10 gsal gdul bya'i tshogs la
2704
bshadl
tha mar 'dris pa'i don la rtse gcig bsgoms;n05
da
2706
sgyu ma'i lus sems 'bral yang 'gyod pa medl
(6) rgyal ba'i bstan pa srog las
2707
gces par bzuni
708
/
rigs dang rni rigs2709 tshul (S346) bzhin mam par phye/
, chad rtsod rtsom
2710
pas dal 'byor don (79a) yod byas/
da27l! sgyu ma'i Ius sems 'bral yang 'gyod pa med/
(7) , gyod med gdeng brod
27
!2 kyi mgur rna ' di/
gangs bu le'i mgue713 du blangs pa yin!
2692
2693
2694
2695
2696
2697
2698
2699
2700
2701
2702
2703
2704
2705
2706
2707
2708
2709
2710
2711
2712
271]
nyamsMR: nyamA.
daAM: om. R.
'bra1 M : bra! AR; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'bra1 ba (tmd.) bra! ba, 'bra1 ba 1) so sor 'thor ba
dang, kha 'gyes pa.
Zha1 gdams 59-3-5: tshe 'di'i myed bkur '" 'gyod pa med Ye shes rgyal mtshan 902.27-28 contains
only three of the four lines of this verse. Line 3c is missing. For the whole text in ms. M see note
2715.
eirMR: ciA.
rtogs MR : rtog A.
thabs MR : thab A.
ba'i AR : pa'iM.
daAM:om.R.
rabAR: rabsM; cf Tshig mdzod chenmo, s.v. gsung rab-sangs rgyas kyi gsung.
dgongs MR : dgong{-} A.
sbyangs MR : <btsa1> A.
1a MR : <la> A.
bsgomsR: abbr. bsgoMsA: sgomsM; cf note 2235.
daAM:om.R.
srog las AR : srogs pas M.
gees par bzung R : gees par gzung M : ees par gzung A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'dzin pa I. (td.)
bzung ba, gzung ba, zung.
dgs dang mi dgs MR : rig dang mi Jig A.
rtsod rtsom MR : abbr. {b}rtsod brtsoM A; cf Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. 'chad rtsod rtsom gsum.
Note that in ms. A the prefix b of brtsod is marked by dots.
daAM:om.R.
gdeng brodMR : bde grod A.
mgu1MR: 'gu1 A; cf. pp. 141, 146, 155,237.
Text Edition
187
wi kho bo'i rjes 'jug dad
2714
ldan mamsl
wi nga bzhin byed na ' di bzhin mdzodl
(8) Here manuscript M h;s verse 8 that is left out in manuscript A.2715
gSlillg ba bzhin gong du bstan pa de ltar ' chi ba ' od gsal gyi droigs pa rgyas par
716
gsungs nasi
chos nangs
2717
par gyi gro1 bar gda'oll
[2.17.2]
zhes gSlillgS shini
718
I nang par719 chos gSlillg ba'i dus mar bcad2720 snYlillg
2721
ba'i tshu1 bstan
nasi gSlillg mi gnang zhing I gsol mi dgongs tsam rna gtogs
2722
snYlillg zug med pasl thugs dam
gyi rim pa mams rna chag cing I ji ltar bzhed pa bzhin 'pho ba mdzad nasi 'brug 10 zla ba bcu
pa'i nyer dgu'i nyi shar laP723 sku lus
2724
gzugs kyi s k u ~ 7 2 5 , od gsal chos kyi skur my a ngan las
'das pa'i tshu1 bstan teP726 skye 'chi la dbang thob pa yin tel bsam bzhin du srid pa bzhes zhing
bzhed pa bzhin
2727
du my a ngan las 'das pa'i phyir roll
2714
2715
2716
2717
2718
2719
2720
2721
2722
2723
2724
2725
2726
2727
dadMR : bskaf A.
Source: Minor Works: Gyod med gdeng brad kyi 'gyur ma, 0030-0031: pp. 9b6-10a6, CPN, no.
006117 refers at the end to 004546 (7 pp. I). The text actually starts with a homage to the guru: nama
guru/;1. However, although the form guru/;1 exists, nama guru/;1 is incorrect Sanskrit, since nama
requires an object in the dative. Correct forms would be nama gurave or nama gurobhyab. All eight
verses are contained in Zhal gdams58.17-59.18 and Ye shes rgyal mtshan 902.23-903.10. These six
of eight verses are part of Red mda' ba's autobiography (rang mam). For the verses skipped in Sangs
rgyas rtse rno see Appendix p. 303.
pal' em. :paA.
Cf. Tshig mdzod chen rno, S.V. nang pa I) nangs pa dang 'dra. Tshig mdzod chen rno, s.v. nangs pa-
sngadro.
gsungs shing em. : gsung zhing A.
nangs em. : nangA.
Cf. note 2490.
snyungem.: bsnyzUlgA.
gtogs em. : tog A.
Cf. NgCh 347.2: drug eu rtsa fnga pa ehu 'brog zfa ba beu pa 'i nyer dgu fa gshegs so. Note that this
dating by Ngor dKon mchog Ihun grub (1497-1557) agrees with mss. A arid B. Also Shes bya'i gter
mdzod317.38-39 agrees with mss. A and B: ehu 'brog fa (1412)zfa ba beupa'inyerdgu'inyi shar fa.
Considering the deviations in Las chen and consequently in Ye shes rgyal mtshan, we may assume that
we are not confronted with simple spelling mistakes. Rather it seems that Las chen Kun dga' rgyal
mtshan (1432-1506) did not simply miscalculate Red mda' ba's year of birth, but corrected mNga' ris
pa Sangs rgyas rtse mo's dating by changing the age of Red mda' ba's death. But since Sangs rgyas
rtse rna was involved in drawing up the horoscope of Red mda'ba (see section 2.11.42) it is most
unlikely that he was mistaken.
Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sku ius - gzugs pa,. .. dgung io mthon po yin yang sku filS thang po 'dug.
Las chen: rgyu fus, see I) 159a5, 2) 311b4, 3) 616.20. Cf. p. 188 and English translation section 2.18
with the respective note.
skurern. : sku A.
teem. : toA.
bzhin em. : shin A.
188
Chapter 5
[2.18 Verse 18]
[18] sgyu Ius kun rdzob bden pa roam par dagl
'od gsal don dam bden pa mngon du gyurl
zung 'jug rdo rje 'chang gi go 'phang broye!?7281
'phrin las lhun grub khyod Ia phyag 'tshaIIol!
zhes2729 pa ni sngon gyi 'phen pa'i dbang gis 'chi ba 'od gsaIIasl bar d0 2730 sgyu Ius su bzhengs
nasI kun rdzob bden pa roam par dag pa mtshan dang dpe byad yongs .su rdzogs pa longs sku
broyes
2731
tel rten de nyid Ia 'od gsaI don
2732
dam pa'i bden pa roam par dag pa chos kyi sku
rnngon
2733
sum du rnngon du mdzad pa nil dbang phyug brgyad Idan zung (S347) 'jug rdo rje
'chang gi go 'phang broyes par gyur tel zhi rgya!?734 dbang drag phrin Ias
2735
roam pa bzhis 'bad
med lhun grub
2736
rgyun rni chad du gzhan don mdzad pas (79b) 'khor ba sdug bsngal gyi rgya
mtsho skem
2737
par mdzad doll
[2.19 Verse 19]
[19] zhing gzhan gshegs tshe sa chen rab tu g.yosl
dpa' bo mkha'. ' gro lha
2738
roams 'dus gyur nas
2739
I
phyi dang nang dang gsang ba de kho nasI
mchod nas spyan drangs khyod Ia phyag 'tshaIIol!
zhes
2740
pa nil skyes bu dam pa roams bltams pa dang I chos kyi 'khor 10 bskor ba dang I my a
ngan las 'das pa'i dus sui 'jig rten Ia gnod par rni 'gyur ba'i sa g.yo barf mdo las gsungs pa Itar
byung ba
2741
kun Ia gsaIIolI
dpa' bo mkha' gro dkarphyogs Ia dga' ba'i lhaklusogs nammkha'Ia 'dus pa gyur tel phyi'i
mchod pa 'dod yon Ingal nang gi mchod pa1
742
sha Inga bdud rtsi Ingal gsang ba'i mchod pa
dga' bzhi'i bde bal de kho na nyid kyi mchod pal gnas lugs rtogs
2743
pa'i Ita bas rang rang gis2744
2728
2129
2730
2131
2732
2733
2734
2135
2736
2131
2738
2739
2740
2741
2742
2743
2744
bmyesem.: bmyedA; cf. p. 71, verse 18.
zhes em. : ces A.
doem.: duA.
bmyes em. : mnyes A.
don compl. : <don> A.
mngon em. : dngon A.
rgyasem.: brgyasA.
'phrin las em. : abbr. phris.
lhun grub compl. : abbr. lhrub A.
skem em. : abbr. skem+s A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. skem pa 1. (td.) bskams pa, bskam pa,
skoms.
lha compl. : <lha> A.
nasem.: teA; cf. p. 72, verse 19.
zhes em. : ces A.
'byung ba em. : byungpaA.
nang gi mchod pa'em. : <abbr. nangi mchod blf> A.
lugs rtogs em. : abbr. lug+s rtog A.
gis em. : gi A.
Text Edition
189
ji Itar nus pa Itar mchod nasi bdag nyid chen po gshegs pa'i2745 gnas su spyan drangs pa yin noll
kun gyis thos pa'i dung dang mga bo che'i sgra skad bsamgyis2746 mi khyab pa byung zhing I
sngar nmam
2747
rna myong ba'i dri bzang po kun gyis2748 tshor ba yang yang byung I bla rna
bsod nams grags pa sogs 'ga' yar gyis2749 mtshan mor
2750
bla brang kun 'od kyis khengs pa
gzigsl de la sogs pa dge ba'i !tas bsam gyis
2751
mi khyab pa byung ngoll
[2.20 Verse 20]
. [20] ye shes me yis khyod sku bzhu ba'i tshel
mkha' Ia sprin med bar snang rIung yang zhi/
sa Ia drod rgyas dbyar bzhin
2752
byin gyis rIabg1753 I
(8348) rten 'breI dbang thob khyod Ia phyag 'tshalIoll
zhes
2754
pa nil dpaI gsang ba 'dus pa'i dkyil 'khor gyi zhal pye nasi Sgrub
2755
pa'i mchod pa
rgyas pa
2756
phul tel ye shes Inga'i mes roam par smin pa'i sku sbyangs pa,?757 tshel skad cig de
nyid Ia rgyan nam mkha'i sprin sogs sgrib g.yogi
758
kun dang braI zhing (80a) vai Q.ilrya'i
2759
rang mdog yongs su rdzogs
2760
par bstan/ bar snang Ia rIung dang 'tshub
2761
rna sogs kyi rdul
2762
dang bral bar gyurl sa gzhi Ia glo bur drod cher rgyas tel grang bas
2763
nyen dang bral bal dbyar
bzhin du byin gyis brIabs pa nil rten cing 'breI bar 'byung ba la dbang thobl Ita ba mam par dag
pa'i mthu yin par kun gyis goyod
2764
1
2745
2746
2747
2748
2749
2750
2751
2752
2753
2154
2755
2756
2757
2758
2759
2160
2761
2762
2763
2764
gshegs pa 'i em. : gar {gang} gshegs pa 'i A. The ligature gangis crossed out.
gyis em. : gyi A.
mnam em. : abbr. sn8M A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. n111am pa 1. nom pa 'i ma 'ongs pa, 2. (tmd.)
1) dri ma bro ba dang.
gyis em. : gyi A.
gyis em. : gyi A.
morem. : mo A.
gyis em. : gyi A.
bzbin em. : gzhin A.
gyis rlabs em. : gyi<s> brlabs A; cf. note 91.
zhes em. : ces A.
gyi zhal pye nas sgrub em. : <gyi> zhal pye nas bsgrob A.
paem. : parA; cf. p. 174.
sbyangs em. : sbyang A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. sbyong ba (td.) sbyangs pa, sbyang ba,
sbyongs 2) skyon spong ba dang, 'dag par byed pa.
g.yogs compl. : g.yog<s> A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, S.Y. g.yog pa (td.) g.yogs pa, g.yog pa, g.yogs
- sleon pa 'am, 'gebs pa'am btum pa.
vai DUiya 'i em. : be dl1IYa'i A; cf. MW, S.Y. vidiira-ja- a cat's-eye gem (ifc. "a jewel" = "anything
excellent of its kind'').
rdzogsem.: rdzogA.
'tshubem.: tshubA.
rdul em. : sdul A.
basem. :pasA; cf. Tshigmdzod chenmo, S.Y. grangba 1) tsha ba'i ldogphyogs.
gyis go yod em. : gyi<s> go yo A.
190
Chapter 5
[2.21 Verse 21]
[21] (B40b2) ston pa'j2765 sku gdung cha brgyad pa bzhin!
khyod gdung dad 1dan lha mi
2767
grangs med kyis
2768
1
phyogs bcur spyan drangs mchod pa'i rten du gyurl
sku gdung rgyas mdzad khyod 1a phyag 'tsha11ol1
zhes
2769
pa nil sngon gyi
2770
gyad kyi yul shing sa277!la zung gi drung dul bcom Idan
2772
'das my a
ngan las' das pa'i dus SU
2773
I sku gdung ring bsrej2774 mamsl lha dang I klu dang I mi mams kyi
cha brgyad du bgos pa bzhin dul bdag nyid chen po 'di'i sku gdung byin gyis rlabs
2775
kyi
snying po can mams kyi skal baf
776
lha klu sogs mi ma yin gyis kyang spyan drangs par grags
tel gdung khang zhal phye dus phyag zhabs kyi rkang 'ga' yar ma tshang bar
m
mthun snang du
grub boll
lhag rna mams nang rten phyi rten
2778
sku 'dra'i nang du gzhui
779
rgyu dang I bu slob
278o
kyi
mchog chos rje blo bzang grags pas
278
! gtso mdzadl rab tu byung ba'i gdul bya mams dang I
sbyin bdag gi mchog tu gyur pa khri (S349) bsod nams rgyal mtshan/ Ide
2782
pa sku mched kyis
thog drangs khyim pa'i 'dul bya mams la bkye
2783
nas lha klu'i gnas dang I bod gangs can gyi
khrod thams cad du mchod pa'i rten du gyur roj2784
[2.22 Verse 22]
[22] mthong thos dran reg gtam du brjod mams I
'di (410) phyi bar do'i mgon skyabs dpung gnyen mdzadl
2765
2766
2767
2768
2769
2770
2771
2772
2773
2774
2775
2776
2777
2778
2779
2780
2781
2782
2783
2784
2785
ston pa 'j compl. : abbr. ston'iB : bston pa 'j A.
bgosem.: dgosA: bsgosB; cf. p. 72, yerse21.
miA: kluB.
kyis B : kyi A.
zhes B : ees A.
gyiA :om.B.
shing sM em. : shing sa A : sa B.
beom idan em. : abbr. be+doMs AB.
dus su compl. : abbr. dUSll B : dus du A.
bsreJ A : srelB.
byin gyis rlabscompl.: abbr. byin+lsB : byingyis brlabsA; cf. note 91.
ba A : ba dang B.
barB : parA.
nang rten phyi rten A : abbr. nang rten+yi rten B.
gzhugem. : bzhug A: <b>zhuDB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'jugpa 1. (td.) beug pa, gzhugpa,
chug I) snod sogs kyi nang du 'jog pa dang blug pa.
slobB: slo{-}bA.
pasB : p+saA.
ideA: sdeB.
la bkye B : <la b>kye A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'gyed pa (td.) bkyes pa, bkye ba, khyes I)
gtongba. .
TO em. : to AB.
kyis B : kyi A; cf. p. 72, yerse 22.
Text Edition
bslu med skyabs gnas dpalldan red mda' bi-
786
I
'dren mchog dam pa khyod
2787
la phyag 'tshalloll
191
zhes
2788
pa (80b) nli dpalldan bla ma de'i sku mthong ba'i gsuni
789
thos pa'i yon tan dran
pa'd
790
'pbrin las kyis279! reg pa'amJ mtshan brjod pa'i
2792
gdul bya mams kyi tshe 'di'i sku
drin
2793
mgonl phyi ma'i skyabsl bar do'i dpung gnyen dam par gyur pal gnas skabs dang I
mthar thug kun tu slu
2794
ba med pa'i skyabs gnas 'dren mchoi
795
dam pa de la bdag sogs gdul
bya thams cad sgo gsum gus pas skyabs su mchf
796
zhing phyag 'tshalloll mchod doll bstod
doll mam pa kun tu rjes su bzung du gsol/
[2.23 Verses 23-33]
[23] kye ma kye
2797
hud bstan pa'i srog shing chagl
bstan 'dzin dge 'dun phyogs bcur 'th0l2798 lags soil
[24] kye ma kye
2799
hud thar pa'i rgyal mtshan 'gyel/
thar 'dod mams kyi thar lam stor lags soil
[25] kye ma kye
2SOO
hud legs bshad dga' ston nyamsl
blo gsal mams kyi re thag chad
2SO
! lags soil
[26] kye ma kye hud Ita ba'i nyi ma nubl
kIu sgrub
2802
yab sras lugs
2803
bzang su yis2804 ston
2S05
1
[27] kye ma kye
2S06
hud dam chos rgya mtsho skamsl
thogs
2807
med sku mched bshad srol su yis skyoni
80S
I
2786
2787
2788
2789
2790
2191
2792
2793
2794
2795
2796
2797
2798
2799
2800
2801
2802
2803
2804
2805
2806
2807
2808
haem. :paAB.
khyod A : de B.
zhcs B : ecs A.
gsung A : abbr. gs+ya B.
pa'amcompl.: abbr.pa'aMA :pa'iB.
'phrin las kyis em. : abbr. phIis kyis B : abbr. phris kyi A.
bl]odpa'icompl.: abbr. bzjod'iB: <h>l]odpa'iA.
sku ddn A : om. B; c Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. sku drill - phanpa'am dan.
slu B : bslu A.
'drenmchogA: <'drenmehog>B.
mehi A: 'ehiB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. skyabs su mehi ha -skyabs su 'gro ba ste yul gang la
blogtodpa.
kyeA: kyiB.
'thor B : mthor A; cf. above verse 23.
kyeA:kyiB.
kyeA:kyiB.
ehadB : bead A; c p. 73, verse 25.
sgrubA: grubB.
lugs B : lung A; cf. p. 73, verse 26.
yisB :yiA.
stonem.: skyongAB; c p. 73, verse 26.
kyeA :kyiB.
thogs B : thog A.
skyongem. : ston AB; cf. p. 73, verse 27.
192
Chapter 5
[28] kye ma kye
2809
hud lung rigs
2810
mche sder 'thoi2
811
/
phyogs glang chos grags rigs
2812
tshu1 su yiS
2813
(8350) spell
[29] kye ma kye
2814
hud tshu1 khrims bum pa zhig/
yon siik
281S
rnam gnyis sdom brgyud
2816
su yis 'dzinl
[30] kye ma kye
2817
hud spangs rtogs
2818
go rim
2819
'tsholl
'phags seng gnyis kyi legs bshad
2820
su yis (41b) sgrogs2821/
[31] kye ma kye
2822
hud nyams rtogs
2823
byin rlabs
2824
yal/
ti
282S
10 na
2826
ro'i man ngag su la zhu/
[32] kye ma kye2
827
hud phan bde'i pad tshal zumI
bshad Sgrub
2828
bstan pa gcig cai2
829
nub lags soil
[33] kye ma kye hud nyam thai
830
yi re mug!
khyod sku mig gis mthong ba'i skal
2831
bas dbenl
[2.24 Verse 34]
[34] (81a) khyod gsung rna bas thos pa'i bsod n a m ~ 8 3 2 medl
khyod
2833
thugs gang na bzhugs kyang byin gyis rlobsf8
34
2809
2810
2811
2812
2813
2814
2815
2816
2817
2818
2819
2820
2821
2822
2823
2824
282.5
2826
2827
2828
2829
2830
2831
2832
2833
2834
kyeA :kyiB.
rigs em. : rig AB.
'thor B : mthor A.
rigs B : rigA.
yisB :yiA..
kyeA:kyiB.
shAle em. : shale B : shag A.
brgyud em. : rgyudB : rgylln A; cf. p. 73, verse 29.
kyeA: kyiB.
spangsrtogsB: spangrtogA; cf. Tshigmdzod chen mo, s.v. spangs rtogs.
rim A : rims B; cf. p. 74, note 123.
legs bshad AB; cf. p. 74, verse 30.
sgrogs B : sgzvg A.
kyeA:kyiB.
nyams rtogs B : abbr. nyaMs rtog A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.v. nyams rtogs.
rIabs B : brlabs A; cf. p. 74, verse 31 and note 71.
fiB: teA.
nAB :naA.
kyeA:kyiB.
sgrub B : bsgrub A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.v. bshad sgrub.
gcigcarcompl.: abbr. 1 carA :phyogs bcurB; cf. p. 74, verse 32.
nyam thagem. : nyams thag B : abbr. nyaMs thug.$,.
skalA: bskalB; cf. p. 74, verse 33.
namsA: namB. '
khyodB : khyed A.
bzhugs kyang byin gyis rlobs em. : bzhugs kyang byin gyis brIobs B : bzhug kyang byin gyis brlobs A.
Text Edition
193
[2.24.1]
rjes su mchod pa phul ba'i tshul nil bla rna bsod nams
2835
grags pas gtso mdzad! bu slob brgya
phrag cig
2836
1hag tsam gyis I zhag bC0
2837
brgyad kyi bar du phyi nang gi dkyil 'khor chen po ' di
dag gi
2838
zhal phye nas gus pas gsol ba btab pa nil bla rna bsod nams grags pa dang I chen po
chos dpal ba gnyis kyis
2839
gtso mdzad kyisl kye'i rdo rje
2840
slob dpon yi dam dpal ba dang I bla
rna yon tan rgyal bas
2841
gtso mdzad mams kyis
2842
kun rigl bla rna rgyal bzang bas
2843
gtso
mdzadl bya bral ba mams kyis chos rje'i thugs dam gyi gtso bo dpal gsang ba 'dus pa dang I
beom ldan 'das 'khor 10 bde mehogf844 slob dpon bka,2845 bzhi pas gtso mdzad! dge 'dun byin
gyis bde gshegs brgyad la [B: phyag dang] mchod pal bdag gis bla rna mehod pa la sogs pa'i
bsgrub mehoct2
846
phul tel gsol ba btabl
(42a) des dus nang so rang gi phyag rdzas gang yod kyis ci ldani'847 byas pa'i lhag mal khab
nang sos zhag gsum/ bdag chen mas zhag gnyisl (S351) drung slob dpon mas gtso mdzad mams
kyis zhag gsum btei'848 nasi gdung gi drung nas gtso mdzad dge ' dun mams la bsnyen bklir
849
'bul 'degs phun sum tshogs pamdzad [B: eing I nang rang gi phyag rdzas kyis gung thang ehos
sde chenpor yang I tsha ba mangja gral 'gyed phunsum tshogs pa dang I sgrub sde bsam gtan
gling du' ang I tsha ba gral ' gyed dang beas pa yang mdzad] doll
nang rten rang byon 'phags pa'i sku tshad [B: dang] mnyam pa'i De btsun 'jam pa'i dbyangs
khri rgyab dang beas pa bzhengs
2850
pa'i zangs gserl bZ0
2851
gnas pa'i yon rgyags sogs kyi sbyin
bdag gi mthil zhugsf
852
drung bdag po bas
2853
mdzad eing I gzhan yang bdag chen mas gtso (81 b)
mdzadl bu slob mams kyis dad eing gus pas phul ba dang I nang so rang gis
2854
thig po sogsl
phyag rdzas kyi bcug gani'855 yod btang nasi mang yul 'phags pa'i gtsug lag khang du bzhugs
2835
2836
2837
2838
2839
2840
2841
2842
2843
2844
2845
2846
2847
2848
2849
2850
2851
2852
2853
2854
2855
namsA: namB.
cigcompl. : abbr. 1 A : gcig B.
beo B : bewo A; cf. Jiischke 1881: beo.
giB :gisA.
kyi5'B: kyiA.
kyerdoIjeB : kye'i rdoeA; cf. LC, s.y. kyerdoIje=Tib. he ba dzra, Skt. hevajra, Tib. he wa dzra.
yon tan rgyaJ bas campI. : yon tan rgyaJ ba<s> A : yon rgyaJ bas B. Note that in ms. A the ligature tan
is marked by dots on top and thus similar to the cases aboye missing in ms. B.
kyis B : kyi A.
basB : pas A.
'khorJo bdemehogcompl. : abbr. 'khaur bdemehogA: bdemehog 'khor loB.
sJob dpon bka 'B : abbr. slaun <b>ka 'A.
bsgnzb mehod A: sgmb mehodB; cf. Tshig mdzod chen rna, s.y. bsgmb mehod
ci Jdang A : ci {-} Jdangs B; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. Jdang ba (tmd.) 2) 'bor tshad long ba 'am,
tshang ba dang, mnyam pa.
btegB : tegA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. 'degspa(td.) btegpa, gdegpa, !heg.
bkurem. : bskurAB; cf. note 2330.
bzhengs A : gzhengs B.
bzoB: gzoA; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. bzognas2) bzolas lag rtsa.
kyi sbyin bdag gi mtml zhugs em. : abbr. kyi sbyin bdagi !hil A : kyi '!hI1 zhugs B,
basB : pas A.
gIsB: giA.
rdzas kyi bcug gang em. : rdzas kyi bzhug gang B : rdzas kyi bzhug <gang> A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen
mo, s.y. 'jugpa I. (td.) beugpa, gzhugpa, chug I) snod sogskyi nangdu 'jogpa dang biugpa.
194
Chapter 5
su gsol zhint856 I sku 'dra'i sbyinbdag chen po chos dpal bas rndzad nasi gtsug lag khang de
nyid nal bzhugs pa'i spyan sngarl bdag nyid chen po rang gisl (42b) jo bo'i drung du phul ba'i
kont
857
bu la dngul darn gcig nman nasi kong
2858
rkyen bzang po brtsegs te phul ba' 0
2859
11 '
rten gnyer chen pOf860 slob dpon yon rin
2861
pas rndzadf
862
rnthil zhugs
2863
bla rna rgyal bzang
pa dang I nye gnas rnchog legs pas
2864
rndzad doll
[B: gzhan yang gdan sa chen mos gtso mdzadl bo dong! snar thang I zha lu
2865
1 gnas rnying I
chos 'khor sgang I dpal gsang phu ne'u thogl ri bo dge 'phella sogs pa'il chos gra chen po
mams su'ang gang lagang 'os kyi mangja 'gyed dangbcas pa bsgrubsl chos rje blo bzang grags
pa'i zhal snga nas kyang I nang rten
2866
rje btsun 'jam pa'i dbyangs sku tshad dang nmya:rrt
867
pa
bzhengs nasi ri bo dge 'phel na bzhugs soil]
[2.25 Verse 35]
[35] dge legs yon tan chu gter chen po lasl
chu thigs
2868
tsarn zhig blangs la
2869
nyes pa'i tshogsl
ji snyed mchis pa tharns cad mtholio bshags2871
zhabs 'bring gnyut
871
ma'i tshogs la bzod par gsol/
[2.26 Verse 36]
[36] bla ma'i marn
2872
thar ngo mtshar rmad
2873
byung 'di
2874
1
bshes gnyen bsod narns grags sogs bkas bskul nasi
2856
2857
2858
2859
2860
2861
2862
2863
2864
2865
2866
2867
2868
2869
2870
2871
2872
2873
2874
bzhugs su gsol zhing B : abbr. bzhugsu gsol cing A.
kongB: skong A; cf. Tshig mdzod chen mo, s.y. kong bu - dpangs mtho zhing gting nng ba'isnod
chung ngu zhig ste mar me 'bu1 snod, ... mchod kong, ... gser kong.
dngu1 dam gcig mnan nas kong em. : abbr. dngu1 daMm (sic) gcig snan nas kong B : abbr. dngul daM
1 mnan nas skong A.
brtsegs te phu1 ba '0 A : rtsegs te phu1 10 B.
po em. : po dang A : po pa dang B.
rinA: nngB.
Another possible reading would be: lten gnyer chen po dang, slob dpon yon nn pas mdzad [He also
paid]; the fee for the main caretaker and the masters [who helped with the inauguration]; cf. Tshig
mdzod chen mo, S.Y. yon - I) rin nam gla cha 'i zhe sa, 2) sbyin ba 'am gtong sgo. Tshig mdzod chen
mo, S.Y. nn pa I) gong gi tshad gzhi, 2) nyo byed kyi dngui.
mthi1 zhugs em.: 'thil bzhugs B : thi1 bzhugs A.
pasB :kyiA.
zha 1u em. : zhallu B.
rten A : brten B.
sku tshad dang mnyam A : ched dang snyam B.
thigsem.: thigAB; cf. p. 75, verse 35.
1a B : 1a {-} A.
mtho110 bshags em. : tho 10 bshags A: 'thoNo gshags B.
gnyug A : snyug B.
mam B: {-}mam A.
nnadB : smad A.
'diB : pa 'i A.
Text Edition
grangs med gdu1 bya'i tha sha1
2875
mnga' ris pal
mi phyed dad thob (S352) sangs rgyas rtse mos sbyarl
[2.27 Verse 37]
[37] dge ba 'di dang dge ba'i rtsa ba gzhan/
ma Ius blo yis gcig (43a) tu bsdoms
2876
byas nasi
bla ma mchoi
877
la gus pas phul ba yisl
bla ma dam pa'i thugs dgongs rdzogspa dang!
sku gsung thugs kyis2878 byin gyis brIab tu gsolf879
195
mam thar zhib rgyas su brjod pa blo,?880 yul (82a) ma yinzhing I [B: bdag nyid chen po'i] drung
rani
88l
nas kyang I ngas ' di ltar byasl ' di bzhin byung sogs cher rni gsung ba dang I rgyun dU
2882
zhabs tog phul ba'i rgyus can la 'dri sa
2883
med pa'i stobs kyisl go rim
2884
gong 'og nor ba sogsl
nyes pa'i tshogs thams cad bzod par mdzad du gsol/
, di
2885
phyogs dus gnas skabs thams cad du dar zhing rgyas par gyur cigl ces pa ' dil dbang
phyug mi la ras chen gyi sti gnas rkang tshugs
2886
phug gi ri khrod du sbyar ba' 01 f887
dge legs
2888
su gyur cigl
[A: rje btsun chen po red mda' ba'i
2889
gsung sgros mdor bsdus pa'oll
mangalaM
2890
bhavatu/]
zhus dag par gcig zhus lagsf89l
[B: subham astu sarvajagatI2892]
2875
2876
2877
2878'
2879
2880
2881
2882
2883
2884
2885
2886
2887
2888
2889
2890
2891
2892
tha shalB : tha bshal A.
gcig tu bsdomsB : cigdu sdomsA; cf. p. 75, verse 37.
mchog B : abbr. mchoD A.
gsung thugs Ayis B : gsungs thugs Ayi A. Note that in ms. A the suffix -s in gsungs is maked by dots.
gyis brlab tu gsolB : brlabs Jug par shog A.
rgyas su bJjodpa blo'iem.: rgyas su bJjodpa blo yiB : brgyas su bIjodpa blo'iA.
rang A : om. B.
ba dang rgylln du B : pa dang rgyun tu A.
'dri sa B : 'dris A.
rim B : rims A.
'diB : 'dis A.
sti gnas rkangtshugsem. : bsti gnas rkang tShlIgsB : ti gnas rkang tshugA; cf. Tshig mdzod chenmo,
s.v. sti ba(tmd.) bstispa, bsti ba, stis-ngal gso'i ched dugnaspa.
ba'oA: baB.
legs B : las A.
ba'iem. :pa'iA.
mangalaM em. : maMghalaM A
zhus dagpargcig zhus lagscompl.: abbr. zhus dagpar 1 zhus lagsA: abbr. 1 ZhlISB.
shubham astu sarvajagatl em. : shubhammastusarvajagatlB.
English Translation
[0 Title]
A44a The Amazingly Marvelous Biography o/the Great Glorious Red mda' ba
1l6
A44b / B Ib / S266
[1 Part I: Introductory Verses]
[Ll Salutation]
gurukumaramataye namal;t
I pay homage to Master Kumaramati! 117
[1.2 Verse 1: Homage to Red mda' hal
[1] I pay homage at the feet of the Glorious Master,
whose knowledge that realized the essence of the two truths is extensive,
the Great Compassionate One, who accomplished both awakening minds,
and whose supreme knowledge
1l8
and compassion119 are matchless.
[1.3 Verse 2-4: Author's Resolution to Expound His Subject] 120
[2] When similarly to Kasyapa, Upali and Ananda,
who respectfully described the Buddha's deeds
from upon a throne
121
made up of the 500 arhats' upper robes
122
,
[saying] with a sorrowful voice "thus have I heard"123,
[3] I express respectfully only the slightest portion
of [the qualities of] The Precious Dharma Lord
124
, whose gratitude can never be repaid,
[and] who, since [we] do not have the fortune to see him [any longer], has become [only] an
object of memory,
[and] the extent of whose qualities 1 did not comprehend, although [1] thought about [them] day
and night,
[4] The meaning of the prophecy "the doctrine of the Buddha will spread [again] when it is
about to disappear" is,125
that [the Buddha] thought that you, great being [Redmda' ba], after appearing at this time when
the doctrine is ending,
[would] intensifY the pure practice of view and conduct.
(2.) 1 pay homage to you who were (S267) prophesied by the Buddha.
198
Chapter 6
[1.4 Verses 5-22: Homage to the Main Subject, Red mda' bal
[5] You intentionally took a life and were born in a religious family,
then entered the [Buddha's] doctrine and learnt from numerous renowned spiritual teachers.
You took the three VOWS
I26
, and protected them as ifmore precious than your own life.
r pay homage to you [who embodied] the Buddha's tradition.
[6] After you had learnt well all siitras, tantras and treatises
127
,
you demolished through perfect scriptures and through reasoning [that uses] the power of fact
all the tenets [holding] the extreme views 128 of etemalism and nihilism.
r pay homage to you who defeated the wrong views.
[7] With the qUalities of [being trained in] the scriptures and [having attained] realization
129
, and
with skill in means
130
and with compassion,
knowing the disposition, intention and latent tendencies of your disciples
as they are, [you] turned the Wheel ofDharma
131
,
r pay homage to you who take [us] fortunate [disciples] under your care.
[8] With the wisdom 132 that realizes the state of being without self,
you see conventional dependent arising [to be] like an illusion,
and realize the ultimate state of phenomena [to be] like space.
r pay homage to you who have the perfect view.
[9] Spiritual teacher, disciplined, pacified, totally pacified
133
,
endowed with all vows, free. of the impurity of [ any] fault or downfall,
your three doors remain in a natural spontaneous state.
r pay homage to you who have perfected [his] conduct.
[10] You renounced this [secular] life and concentrated on the essence of practice.
You meditated on the four truths, on dependent arising, the six perfections and the two stages
134
[and] achieved the (2b) supreme siddhis
135
ofmahamudr1L
r pay homage to you who have perfected [his] practice.
[11] Although 'hitting the core' in your profound meditative accomplishment,
continually seeing masters
l36
, tutelary deities, rjiikinis and Dharma protectors,
you abide [solitary] in yogic discipline
137
like a pratyekabuddha.
r pay homage to you who are marvelous.
[12] Noble, ordained and wealthy people of the snow mountains
(S268) respectfully invited [you], offered material gifts and service
138
[and] received numerous empowerments, generations of [bodhi}citta
l39
and instructions.
r pay homage to you who are worthy of worship by all [sentient beings].
[13] After you thought of entering into nirvliI}.a in the year of the dragon,
you entrusted the subtle meanings of what you had heard and understood
English Translation
as the Buddha entrusted [the responsibility for] the doctrine [to the seven custodians]140.
I pay homage to you who assiduously141 teach the Wheel of Dharma.
[14] After you had taught that all phenomena in saIpsara and nirv3J;i.a are unbom142,
although you wished to enter into nirv3J;i.a, the state of true nature (tathatii),
in response
143
to the respectful supplications [made by disciples],
you blessed your life
l44
for up to seven days. I pay homage to you.
[15] 'The clear light of death 145 cannot rely on the body.
After body and mind have separated, the consciousness 146 enters into emptiness.
The lnseparability of sphere and awareness
147
are the clear light."
I pay homage to you, who spoke thus again and again.
199
[16] After having meditated previously [and] given meaning
148
to the oral instruction
149
on the
transferring [of consciousness],
not forgetting the signs, having entered the clear light with joy,
you arose from [meditative] absorption in cessation
150
and migrated, propelled by what had
preceded.
I pay homage to you who act in accord with the words.
[17] After you turned the profound and vast Wheel of Dharma
for your direct disciples of this life,
at the time of the clear light of death you passed away for the benefit of others.
I pay homage to you who attained power over birth and death.
[18] (3a) Your perfect illusory body, which is conventional truth,
manifested as the clear light, the ultimate truth.
[You] have attained the unified state ofVajradhara
151
.
I pay homage to you who have accomplished spontaneity of activity.
[19] At the time when you passed on to another buddhafield, the great earth trembled.
I pay homage to you who were invited [there],
by the viras, rjiikinis and deities who had assembled
and who made (8269) outer, inner and secret offerings from the state of true nature [to you].
[20] At the time when your body melted into the fire of wisdom,
there were no clouds in the sky and the wind in the space 152 became still too.
Due to your blessing the heat on the earth rose as in the sunnner,
I pay homage to you who attained power overdependent arising.
[21] As the Buddha's relics were divided into eight portions,
similarly your relics were invited by the countless devout gods and human beings
into the ten directions to become an object ofworship153,
I pay homage to you who increased [his] relics.
200 Chapter 6
[22] From what [I have] seen, heard, remembered, [physically] touched
154
and [know from] sto-
ries told,
[you] act [as] protector!55, refuge
156
and cornrade
157
in this life, in future lives, and in the inter-
mediate states 158.
Glorious Red mda' ba, infallible object of refuge,
I pay homage to you, the holy supreme leader.
[1.5 Verses 23-33: Lamentation for the Lost Master]
[23] Alas, the life tree of the doctrine is broken.
The holders of the doctrine, the sangha [members], have scattered in the ten directions.
[24] Alas, the victory banner
159
ofliberation has fallen down.
Those who wish for liberation have lost the path of liberation.
[25] Alas, the enjoyment of elegant sayings has declined.
The cord of hope for the clear-minded is cut offl60.
[26] Alas, the sun of[right] view has set.
Who [will] explain the excellent tradition of father Nagiirjuna and his [spiritual] children?
[27] Alas, the ocean of Dharma is dry.
Who [will] maintain the teaching tradition of the brothers Asanga [and Vasubandhu]?
[28] (3b) Alas, scripture and reasoning, which are like the incisor and claws [of a lion], have
become dispersed.
Who [will] spread the logical system ofDignaga and Dharmaklrti?
[29] Alas, the vessel
161
of moral conduct is destroyed.
Who [will] uphold the vow lineage of GUIfaprabha and Sakyaprabha?
[30] Alas, the sequence of abandonment and realization has become disordered.
Who [will] proclaim the elegant sayings of Aryavimuktisena
162
and Haribhadra
l63
?
[31] Alas, the blessings of experience and realization have disappeared.
Whom [will] we request for the oral instructions ofTilopa
164
and Niiropa
l65
?
[32] Alas (8270), benefit and happiness have closed like lotus flowers [in a] pond
l66
.
The doctrine of expounding and practicing [the Dharma] were simultaneously lost.
[33] Alas, [we] pitiful [people] have fallen into despair,
devoid of the fortune to see you [any longer] with [our] eyes.
[1.6 Verse 34: Request for Blessings 1
J
[34] [We] do not have the merit to hear your speech [any longer] with [our] ears.
Wherever your mind is, please bless us.
English Translation
[1.7 Verse 35: Confession and Request for Forbearance any Fault
. [35] From the huge ocean 167 of [your] excellent qualities,
[I have] taken just [as much as] a <;!rop of water, and whatever mistakes there are,
I openly express and confess them all.
I beg the resident group of close disciples and attendants 168 to forgive [those faults] ..
[1.8 Verse 36: Author's Colophon] 169
201
[36] After having been exhorted by the spiritual teacher (46a) bSod nams grags pa and others,
the most inferior
17o
among his countless disciples, the mNga' ris pa
who has achieved unfailing faith, Sangs rgyas rtse mo, has composed
this amazingly wonderful biography of [his] master.
[1.9 Verse 37: Dedication and Request for Blessings]
[37] After my mind has gathered together this virtuel71 with other roots of virtue 172,
I offer [them] to [my] supreme teacher with respect. Due to this
after all intentions
173
of the supreme teacher have been fully accomplished,
I request that I be blessed by [his] body, speech and mind
to complete the biography of the glorious teacher.
202 Chapter 6
[2 Part IT: Verse-by-Verse Commentary]
[2.1 Verse 1: Reverent Salutation: Praising Red mda' ba's Knowledge and Compassion]
[1] (4a) I pay homage at the feet ofthe Glorious Master,
whose knowledge that realized the essence of the two truths is extensive,
the Great Compassionate One, who accomplished
174
both awakening minds,
and whose supreme knowledge and compassion are matchless.
Concerning these [words] it is said: "The being who possesses unassailable supreme knowledge
and immeasurable compassion is the predominant scholar dPalldan Red mda' ba."
[2.1.1 Praise of Red mda' ba's Supreme Knowledge]
While this renowned noble being possesses [two kinds of] superior knowledge 175, his superior
knowledge is extensive. [rJe btsun Red mda' ba possesses] the superior knowledge [that under-
stands] all phenomena as they are176. [This means he understands] the conventional tmths
177
from
form up to the knowing of [all] aspects 178, he realized (8271) that the general characterized [phe-
nomena] 179 are empty oftheir own entity180, and sees the special characterized [phenomena] like
a myrobalan fruit on the palm of one's handl8l. [More over, he] possesses the superior
knowledge [that understands] the mode of existence of all phenomena 182. [This means he under-
stands] that ultimately saIfIsara and nirvava are free from all extremes ofproliferation
183
.
[2.1.2 Praise of Red mda' ba's Immeasurable Compassion]
He wears the armor of the special altruistic mind
184
that wishes to free all sentient beings from
the saIfIsaric ocean of suffering, and since he is endowed with the virtuous effort
185
of perfectly186
preparing to liberate [all sentient beings], [and] has accomplished both awakening minds - the
mind of aspiration [for full enlightenment] and engagement [in the actual practice of a
Bodhisattva]- he is endowed with great compassion
187
.
As there is no one in the Land of Snow whose supreme knowledge and compassion are equally
excellent as his, he is matchless.
The great being [Red mda' ba] himselfsaid
188
:
"Meditate the wisdom that sees that saIfIsara and the peace [ofnirvava] are void [and]
the compassion that observes sentient beings, who are infinite)ike the sky,
one-by-one, and sometimes in union."
[A: In a praise by The Dharma Lord 810 bzang grags pa
189
, it is said:
"Your knowledge is outstanding, and your fortune incomparable 190."
(46b) mKhan chen Chos rgyal said:
"The blissful heat of [your] great heart of awakening blazes high."]
English Translation
[2.1.3 Tsong kha pa's Praise of Red mda' ba as Maiijusri and Avalokitesvara]
[B: It is said:
"Lord of stainless wisdom, MaiijusrI,
Huge treasure of great objectless compassion
l91
, Avalokitesvara,
Crown ornament among scholars of the land of snow, Red mda' ba,
gZhon nu blo gros, I pay homage to yoU.]"192
203
Endowed with the glory (4b) of the two accumulations [of merit and wisdom], [you] attained the
unmistaken empowerments (dbang, [explanations on the] tantras (rgyud) and oral
instructions [from the. experience of the master] (man ngag).193 Then you realized [all of them].
I respectfully pay homage to [you, Buddha] [B: by the means of the three doors (body, speech
and mind)]. I bow with the highest part of all of my limbs
l94
, with the crown of my head, to the
lowest of all parts of the body of the teacher, to his lotus feet, praising [him with the words] "due
to whose kindness the great bliss [appears ]"195 and so on, having generated faith and respect.
[2.2 Verses 2-4: Author's Resolution to Expound his Subject]
[2] When similarly to (8272) Kiisyapa, Upiili and Ananda,
who respectfully described the Buddha's deeds
from upon a throne made up of the 500 arhats' upper robes,
[saying] with a sorrowful voice 'thus have I heard',
Concerning these [words]: The hearers of the Buddha trained in his 84.000 [teachings], and
those [B: among] the holders of the Vinaya and the greatly learned who became sublime were
Kasyapa, Upali and Ananda. After the [Buddha's] nirviilJa they engaged in preserving the
Dharma of [his] noble doctrine for a long time. And after the holders of the doctrine, the 500
arhats, had assembled for this purpose without a single one missing, [they made up] a throne of
the [500 arhats'] upper robes, recollected the qUalities of the Buddha, and then [recited] with a
sorrowful voice: "Thus have I heard at one time, when the Bhagavat
l96
[was.residing] in Raja-
grha197 on Vultures' Peak Mountain
l98
.... " and so on, they collected [the Tripi!aka, in which it is
expressed], how initially the Buddha generated [the altruistic] mind to [attain] the supreme
Buddhahood
l99
, [how] in the interim period [he] accumulated a multitude [ofmerif
oo
and wis-
dom] over three countless
201
aeons
202
, [and how] at the end [he] performed the twelve deeds for
the benefit of sentient beings. [Thus they collected] the three precious types ofPi!akas: the Abhi-
[ dharma], the Vinaya [and] the Siitra Pi!aka
203
.
[2.3 Verse 3: Red mda' ba's Infinite Qualities]
[3] I express respectfully only the slightest portion
of [the qualities of] The Precious Dharma Lord
204
, whose gratitude can never be repaid,
[and] who, since [we] do not have the fortune to see him [any longer], has become [only] an
object of memory,
204
Chapter 6
[and] the extent of whose qualities (5a) I did not comprehend, although [I] thought about
[them] day and night,
Concerning these [words]: The Precious Dharma Lord's kindness in teaching the perfect path to
me and the other disciples is inconceivable. [We do] not have the fortune to see him [any longer]
with our direct eye perception, and [so] (470) he has become solely an (8273) object of the memory
of [ our] mental consciousness. [And] although [I] respectfully thought about [him] day [and]
night, I was not able to comprehend the extenf
05
ofhis infinite qualities of [having learnt many]
scriptures and having realized [all] qualities [included in the three higher trainings].
In a praise [B: from mKhan chen Chos rgyal] it is said:
"If even all the spiritual teachers, who are [like] the lord Garuga
206
,
cannot see the extent of your qualities,
how could it be that I, whose intellect is like a butterfly,
have the ability to infer [them]?"
Nevertheless, ifI am to express respectfully just the slightest portion of the qualities [of his] that
I have seen or heard in conformity with my own fortune, after having set aside [any]
exaggeration or flattery, [it will be as follows]:
[2.4 Verse 4: Prophecy by the Buddha]
[4] The meaning of the prophecy "the doctrine of the Buddha will spread [again] when it
is about to disappear" is,
that [the Buddha] thought that you, great being [Red mda' ba], after appearing at this
time when the doctrine is ending,
[would] intensify the pure practice of view and conducf
o7

I pay homage to you who were prophesied by the Buddha.
The [aforementioned refers] to a sutra, [where it is said:] "As the light of the butterlamp be-
comes brighter just before it dies out my doctrine will spread [again] just before it disappears."
The purported meaning of this prophecy is: Even at the end of this degenerate period of the
doctrine, you, great being [Red mda' ba], who are learned and realized, appeared, with the
intention of spreading and extending the Buddha's doctrine through perfectly practicing right
view and conduct. And although in the past, for the same reason, i!'J.any of the greatest scholars
had already appeared here, in the Land of Snow, some stressed clarifying only the aspect of view
(5b), others emphasized clarifying only the side of conduct and still others clarified only the
essence of practice, nothing more than that. But I have neither seen nor heard
208
of anybody else
but you - before or after - who clarified the doctrine through both teaching and practice (S274).
[2.4.1 From a Letter to Tsong kha pa about the Decline ofthe Doctrine]
From a writing of the great being [Red mda' ba]:209
(1) "If even the famous, who are greatly venerated by many,
are longing for material gifts, service and fame,
English Translation
[and] do not uphold the Buddha's doctrine as an important thing [any longer],
(47b) who will be the noble one who cherishes the doctrine of the sage here?
(2) Most of the supposed scholars are like talking parrots.
205
[Their capability] goes no further than following the words, and the reading of just an arrow-
sized [page ]210.
If they become stupefied distinguishing [between] right and wrong,
where are the eloquent speakers of [sound] reasoning here?
(3) If even [the meditation of] the yogis who are meditating day and night,
as [Siddharta's teacher] Udraka
211
meditated on concentration (samiidhi)212,
became devoid of the vital poinfJ3 of correct view,
then there is no practitioner who has entered the perfect path.
(4) Although [people] get fully ordained for the purpose offood
214
[and a seat] in the row of the
celibates,
there are [still] a few sramaI).as who have respect for proper training in moral conducf
15
.
Alas! The doctrine of the Sakya
remains only in name; I alone see [this]."
And in BIo bzang [grags pars praise it is said:
"You realized the tradition that is accepted by NiigiiIjuna and Asanga
as it is, and then, out of compassion you elegantly taught
the secret faultless speech.216
Therefore, who else after you will display
this gift of certainty with regard to the essence of the doctrine?"
[2.5 Verse 5: Former Lives, Birth, Education and Scholarship]
[5] You intentionally took a life and were born in a religious family,
then entered the [Buddha's] doctrine and learnt from numerous (6a) renowned spiritual
teachers.
You took the three vows, and protected them as if more precious than your own life.
I pay homage to you [who embodied] the Buddha's tradition.
[2.5.1 Former Reincarnations]
Concerning these [words]: In his previous life, this great being [Red mda' ba] was born as the
one called "KiismIri PaI).<;lita Amoghavitjra"217, and because The Dharma Lord BIo bzang grags
pa was then PaI).<;litaMatibhadra
218
(S27S), [Red mda' ba] unmistakenly taught the dharma
exposed in the Tripitaka and the general exposition
219
of the four classes oftantras to him - as
the foremost - along with an inconceivable number of disciples. [This account,] how [Red mda'
ba thus] extensively acted for the purpose of the doctrine and sentient beings, Vajrapiir}.i220 told
to Phyag rdor Grub thob
221
.
206 Chapter 6
[2.5.2 Birth]
Then, to overcome those here in the Land of Snow who engage in wrong practices of view and
conduct, he was intentionally born near Tibet's rDo rje gdan 01 ajrasana)222, the glorious Sa skya,
at a [place] that is well-known as the Fort(ress)223 ofRedmda'224, in the lineage of [the clan] of
the protector of the country225 mGar stong btsan (d. 667), a minister of the Dharma king Srong
btsan sgam p0226 (488), as the son of the father bKra shis rgyal mtshan, minister of Red mda', who
was in union with the mother, a wisdom rjiikini called [B: "Lo dBang phyug skyid,"] whose
perfectly altruistic way of acting was like that of the Brahmin woman called PrakasasIla
227

228
As
he was entering into her womb, she had auspicious dreams such as the rising of sun and moon,
lighting of [butter] lamps, and construction of new temples. [The mother] was free of any
physical pain and had a joyful mind. Even at the time of birth, both mother and son were free of
the suffering of birth.
In a praise it is said:
229
"At the time when you, like Buddha in the Lumbini grove,
were born from the stainless mother's womb,
because of excellent merit you did not have (6b) a body received [due to karma],
otherwise you could have become Lord Brahma himself or died."
After that, you were nourished with milk, curd, a decoction of butter and so forth, and moreover
you were offered the name "bTsun ne
230
." From the time on, when he was able to speak and
understand the meaning [of words] , when he [simply] heard the sound (8276) "Three jewels" or
saw an object representing them, his faith and respect grew. Both father and mother expired at
a young age, and an aunt,231 a qualified rjiikini, called "bKra shis 'bum"232 offered her services
without exhaustion from his youth until he became a great, mighty scholar. Thus it is said that
she was extremely kind. At the time of his childhood, the great being [Red mda' ba] said: "A ne
lags, I will either lead the land ofTibef
33
towards happiness, after having taken up the seal
234
of
the great ruler of Sa skya [state] (Sa skya dpon chen), or just as [the sun brightens] the day [I
will] brighten the [Buddha's] teaching, after I have entered through the gateway of the doctrine."
The aunt answered: "Clever
35
bTsun ne, don't get covetous. xpu cannot [ accomplish] both." At
that time [he] became also well-known under the name bTsun ne Blo gros che (Mahamati).
[2.5.3 Taking Refuge, Generating ofBodhicitta, Taking Upasaka and Sramal,lera Vows]
At that time [Red mda' ba] took refuge, the generation of [bodhi]citta, and the vow of' [ one day]
fasting' (bsnyen gnas, upaviisa/
36
as well as many Dharma teachings on Mahakarw;ta
237
from
'Phags chen
238
Chos bzang dpal (b. 13. cent.)239 Thereafter the great being [Red mda' ba] thought
about entering the gate of the doctrine, [in other words, to take ordination] in order to make
meaningful [the human birth that] he achieved with the [eight] leisures
240
and [ten] endowments.
Therefore in the 18th year of his life [1365]241, from Sa bzang [Ma til PaJ;l chen
242
(1294-1376),
who had become a noble crown ornament of the saffron-colored [Vinaya] holders in the snoW
mountains, he obtained the vow of a lay man (dge bsnyen, upiisaka) and a novice (dge tshul,
sriimalJera) (48b) and moreover [he] received the name "gZhon nu blo gros."
English Translation
207
[2.5.4 PramiilJa Studies, Bodhisattva Vow, Mental Purification Transmission, Authoring
of Two PramiilJa Commentaries]
Then [Red mda' ba] thought of studying the gateway to (7a) all important objects of knowledge,
the corrunentary on the general thoughts of the Buddha, [Dharmakfrti's] comprehensive Com-
mentary on [Digniiga's Compendium on] Valid Cognition (PramiilJaviirttika, Tshad ma rnam
'grell
43
Thus he approached the greatest among the scholars, Nya dbon Kun dga' dpal (1285-
13 79)244 and the lion [among the experts] on scriptures and reasoning, mKhan chen Sangs rgyas
(S277) 'phel.
245
By training his intellect (blo gros, mati), he reached some understanding of the
Viirttika, and then, after making debate rounds (grwa skor l46, [he] attained fame as having great
wisdom.
At that time, just by hearing the name of the son of the Victor
247
, Thogs med bzang po dpal
(1295-1369)248, it happened that the fme hairs coming from his pores moved, tears rolled down
from his eyes and so on. Then The Precious Dharma Lord went to [Thogs me bzang po's] Chos
rdzong in dNgul chu
249
, and took from the great [Bodhi]sattva the generation of the mind of
aspiration [for full enlightenment] and engagement [in the actual practice of a Bodhisattva],
[and] received many Dharma teachings on Mahayana Mental Purification
250
(theg pa chen po blo
sbyong).251
Then, afterheretumed to the main seat [Sa skya], he had to answer [a question] in the Chos khri
yard (chos khri thang). In a [Philosophical] text, a formally stated syllogism252 was asserted that
was not easy to refute. And although the [other] participants in the debate round did not know
[the answer] either, he himself felt extremely worried. When he himself did not come to an
understanding of what the [PramiilJaJviirttika text was saying, he thought that he must have been
deceived by the oral traditions received from his teachers
253
. Thereafter he remained in Sa skya
in a retreat on the scriptures
254
, and studied texts very much.
He studied [Dharmakfrti 's] seven treatises on valid cognition
255
together with its [basic] siltra
256
and [other] sub-corrunentaries. He also studied the elegant sayings of the lord of supreme
knowledge Sa skya Pa1J.cJita (1182-1251) and of 'U yug pa Rigs pa'i seng ge (d. 1253).257 And
due to listening to many Dharma teachings from his greater and lesser teachers [Nya dbon and
Sangs rgyas 'phel], he urnnistakenly realized the meaning of the seven treatises and their com-
mentaries, and thereafter his fame (7b) as a scholar spread all over the world. Then he compiled
two pramiilJa corrunentaries ('grel bshad; {ikiil
58
of different lengths, a long one and a short one,
together with a general overview of the topic (spyi don). 259
It is said:
(I) "Even a fme glowing ray of [your] elegant explanation
can eclipse the splendor often million seemingly scholar-fireflies, and (49a)
(S278) this wisdom that emits one hundred rnillion
260
logical ways
is [like] a sun that did not exist before.
208
Chapter 6
(2) The seeds that originated in the womb
261
of the [mind]-basis-of-all
262
have produced with [the help of] the mother, wisdom, the virtuous effort,
which is my foster-mother who continuously took care of me here in the Land of Snow.
I myself was born as the holder of the lineage
263
of the glorious Dha=akIrt?64.
(3) Nevertheless, in the Land of Snow,
because [people] do not know how to differentiate between scholars and fools,
as in the case of [false] jewels
265
that are passed around in the hands offishe=en,
the bad-minded increase together with the mass of things for sale.
(4) Although we are able to overpower the brains of elephant-like opponents
by the reasoning ofproo[266 and refutation
267
[that are like] the incisor and claws [ofa lion],
when lacking the neutrality to differentiate between good and bad,
even bad proponents, [who are like a] group offoxes
268
, continously quarrel."
In a praise [by Tsong kha pa it is said]:
"(1) Pleasing to those of great mental abilities
who are endowed with the taste of many hundreds of ways of reasoning,
you are the only one ready to completely propound
[all] the special prama(w systems that have been composed."
"(2) A neck that is covered by the dense mane ofthe seven treatises [on Pramii1;la]
that increase the power of the [Pramal}ajsiitra
269
[carried in a] palanquin of one's own inter-
pretation
causes the ox of bad wisdom [i.e., the mind of the sham scholars]
to wander among the clefts of the pramal}a mountains [instead on the hill]."
[2.5.5 Studies and Writings on the Paramitas]
Then the great being [Red mda' ba] thought that he should study the teachings on the main
stages of clear insight, the AbhisamayalaIpkara from the speeches ofMaitreyanatha, [who is] the
Lord of the Ten Stages (Dasabhfunfsvara) and the Regent of the Victorious One (Yuvaraja)270,
together with (8a) its commentaries. [Thereupon] he put one blockprint of the scripture on the
paramitas inside his pillOW
271
, and when he fell asleep, in a dream he heard the whole scripture
from "In Indian language" up to "is completed." He took [the whole scripture from which the
letters] were raised [as if a bas-relief]272 (S279) with his hand, put the [letters] into his mouth one
by one, and experienced the [scripture's] exquisite taste. Then he arose from sleep and was filled
with joy. He thought, 'Today I will see how much [I can] learn by heart,' and started memo-
rizing. It is said that he finished the memorizing of the [B: first] great section
273
. And although
he was already someone who knew the scriptures (49b) and who had achieved an understanding
[of the meaning] of Dharma [expressed] in the scriptures, he [was still not satisfied and] thought,
'I want to become an excellent scholar,' and thereupon received teachings from the glorious
Dha=a Lord Bla rna dam pa bSod nams rgyal mtshan
274
, crown ornament of the nine types of
sentient beings, and others. Especially by studying Indian commentaries such as the Illumination
English Translation 209
of the [Perfection of Wisdom in} 20,000 Verses (Nyi khri snang ba, ViipSatyiilokii)275 [of Arya
Vimuktisena (beg. 6th century)]276 and the Large Commentary on the Siitra of the Perfection of
Wisdom in 8, 000 Verses
277
[by Haribhadra (end 8th century)]278, as well as Tibetan commentaries
such as [those] of 'Bre [Shes rab 'bar]279 and Ar [Byang chub ye shesf80, he comprehended the
unmistaken thoughts of Arya [Vimuktisena] and Hari[bhadra]. Thereafter he composed a word-
by-word commentary (sbyor rik) on the Prajfiiipiiramitii[siitra}, applying the meaniJig of the
seventy items [of the AbhisamayiilaIpkiira28I [to it].
It is said:
"(1) Although those with a childish mind, who [just] follow the words,
rejoice because they have recited the ancient traditions of explanation,
[but] having seen this [just as] the arduous tossing up of grainless chaff,
I myself have given up reciting the enumerations stated by others.
(2) [The sbyor ilk] does not contradict the way of the general meaning of the many scriptures,
and [it] proves the meaning of the words through reasoning by the power of facts.
However long the seeming scholars who are endowed with obvious pride
may analyze it, there is no ground for criticism282."
In a praise by Gon byo Nyi rna [grags f83 it is said:
"(8b) Due to perfecting all the other scriptures [embodying] the opinions of the aryas by [reading
them] just once,
[you] obtained the state of having reached the other side
of the ocean
284
of[your] own and others' tenets (S280)."
[2.5.6 Abhidharma Studies and Writings]
Then the great being [Red mda' ba] thought that he should study the Pitaka, which manifests the
fimdamentals of all phenomena
285
, [i.e., the Abhidharma]. He then approached the great scholar
of the five fields ofknowledge
286
[Lo chen] Byang chub rtse mo (1303/06-13 8 0/8 6i
87
and heard
from him the Upper and Lower Abhidharma, [i.e., "Asanga's" Abhidharmasamuccaya and
Vasubandhu's Abhidharmakosa ]288 several times. He also studied [ other] comprehensive works
such as [Asanga's] Five Treatises on the Stages289, [Asanga's] Two Compendia of Summarized
Treatises
290
and Vasubandhu's Eight Treatises
291
together with their commentaries. He further
studied the explanations of the highest of all scholars, a commentary by dPang Lo tsa ba
292
BIo
gros bstan pa (1276-1342)293, and after he had unmistakenly realized the intended meanings of
the brothers Asanga [and Vasubandhu] (50a) [due to these studies], he compiled commentaries on
the upper94 and lower Abhidharma
295
together with a summarizing overview (bsdus donf96.
After he had seen the signs of the Lord of the Sky_goers,297 activities in the Sky298, [Red mda' ba]
said: "Following their example although the wings [i.e., one's mind,] are not fully developed
[yet], is like teaching [others] following the very intelligent ancient scholars, and although
[people] criticize [me] out of jealousy299, there is not the slightest mistake [on my side]."
In a praise by BIo [bzang grags pal, it is said:
210 Chapter 6
"Holder of the Muni's Tradition, [you] who are endowed with the ten powers
300
,
Introducer of the Mind [Vehicle], Ornament of the World
301
,
Holder of the Lineage ofthe Sugata,
You are the only one who has understood the tradition of the brothers
Asanga and [Vasubandhu] as it is."
[2.5.7 Vow, Lineage, Vinaya Studies and Writings, and Instruction on the View
of the Middle Way]
Then the great being [Red mda' ba] thought [B: that he must] introduce the tradition ofprac-
ticing faultless (9a) Vinaya training, through receiving the vow in order to complement the
[Buddha's] doctrine. Thereupon he went to the senior monk (gnas brtan, sthiivira), the great
arhat mKhan chen lDog lhod pa
302
Kun dga' (S281) bzang po, and received the vow of full
ordination (bsnyen par rdzogs pa, upasaJ!1Padii) from him as the preceptor (mkhan po, upiidhyii-
ya) along with the [other]acaryas
303
. Then he heard the Vinayasutra
304
, [composed by G1ll)a-
prabha], from mKhan chen [lDog lhod pa] one time. Then Khan chen pa himself also expressed
great expectations. [Red mda' ba] received the Instruction on the View
305
as well. And when the
teaching was over, rnI<han chen pa gave him a bya bur
06
, [and said:] "You have great inborn
wisdom, and due to having learnt the other scriptural traditions [B: too], you even became a
much greater scholar on Vinaya than 1. You are suitable to be a holder of the Dharma. You
should [B: also] write a commentary on this. I wish this Upper Vinaya lineage
307
to remain an
unintenupted one."308
[Red mda' ba] accepted the kind advice given. By studying the Vinayasutra, the Vinayasutra{ika
(Dul ba'i mdo 'i rgya cher 'grel pa) [by Dharmamitra (Chos kyi bshes bsnyen)] and the Tibetan
commentaries such as the three [by] Bya
309
, Khyi and Sog3lO, he understood (50b) the unmistaken
intended meaning of GUl).aprabha and S1ikyaprabha.
And then he composed two commentaries, one on the Vinayasutra
311
and one on [karmaviicaniiJ
acts and rites312. Henceforth, even at the times when he was giving teachings, he unfailingly313
attended the [acts and rites] of restoration (gso sbyong; rainy [season] retreat (dbyar
gnas, and removal of restrictions [at the end of the rainy season retreat] (dgag dbye, pra-
viirmJii).
Thus it is said:
"These elegant sayings were produced to condense
the entire meaning ofthe vast collection of the discipline
314
that is the inner treasure of the Mu-
ni, composed by the one renowned in the three spheres
315
as 'Gul).aprabha,'
the holder of the Victor's tradition
316
."
It is said in a praise [by Tsong kha pa] BIo [bzang grags pa]:
"After having seen [one of] the aryas' [seven] jewels
317
, the moral discipline,
that was praised not just once by the Muni,
in accord with the intended meaning of (S282) Sarvastivadin scholars [such as] (9b)
English Translation
Upagupta
318
, CandramaJ}i and GUlJaprabha,
he became learned in the rules
319
, which are [explained] in the vast collection of discipline
as 'prohibition, requirement or permission' 320, and he did not transgress [them]."
211
[2.5.8 Madhyamaka Studies,' Writing and Establishment of Prasangika Education
System]
Then the great being [Redmda' ba] wished to study the Collections of Middle Way Reasonings
(dBu ma rigs pa 'i tshogs/
21
, personally composed by Arya Nagiirjuna, the main teacher of the
essential meaning. But at that time in the snow mountains the [Buddha's] word
322
[B: on
Madhyamaka] just barely survived; the traditions of making them understandable through
explaining and listening, and of practicing through meditation and accomplishment had become
degenerated. And although due to this he became very discouraged, [Redmda' ba] thought that
he should ask the glorious Blama dampa [bSodnams rgyal mtshan (1312-1375)] for explana-
tions. But since he was in dBus, this was not possible.323 And [thus] he studied [scriptures] on
Madhyamaka such as the Collections of Reasonings (Rigs tshogs), the Four Hundred [Verses J
(CatuMataka/
24
and the Entrance to the Middle Way (Madhyamakiivatiira/
25
with The Dharma
Lord Byang [chub] seng [gel (b. 14th cent.)326. [Redmda' ba] made prayers to the three jewels,
and analyzed the content [of these scriptures] again and again using his wisdom. And due to the
prayers done previously, by the power of learning and in dependence on the blessing of the
jewels, he realized the faultless thoughts of father Nagiirjuna and his spiritual son Sri
Candraldrti. And after he had also attained an unadulterated understanding of the scriptural
tradition of the great scholar Bhavaviveka and of the three main treatises of the Y ogaciira
Madhyamaka synthesis of eastern India
327
, (Sla) he properly established them [as a system]
through teaching and listening.
At that time, his students requested him: "Please establish [a scriptural tradition through]
monastic textbooks (yig cha/
28
on the most important [points] in [Nagiirjuna' s] Root of the Mid-
dle Way in verses (Miilamadhyamakakiirikii), [CandrakIrti's] Entrance to the Middle Way (Ma-
dhyamakiivatiira) and [Aryadeva's] Four Hundred [Verses J (CatuMataka)." In response to their
repeated requests, he compiled commentaries on these three
329
, i.e., the Roof30, the ,
and the Four Hundred
332
, as well as an overview commentary (sTong thunl
33
on [Candraklrti's]
"Clear Words" (Tshig gsal, Prasannapadii/
34
. And because then all spiritual teachers listened
to and gave teachings on [these commentaries], the tradition of teaching and listening to the
(S283) Madhyamaka was thoroughly (lOa) introduced. And because of this driving force, at that
time also the teachers Dharma Lord Grags pa rgyal mtshan and his nephew, Lo tsa ba sKyabs
mchog dpal [bzang] (b. 14th cent.l
35
and his nephew, and the great scholar g.Yag phrug Sangs
rgyas dpal (1348/50-l4l4l36 started also giving teachings on Madhyamaka. Thus here in the
snow mountains the teaching system of Madhyamaka became widespread and increased
considerably, but it [still] remained mainly [focused] on
m
Svatantrika. The Prasangika view3
38
did not exist even as a mere understanding. But to this extent it was good
339
.
[Red mda' ba] said: "When I frrst started my studies in such places as Sa skya there were many
who made the mistake of saying that there was [just] one Madhyamaka text. Nowadays that
212
Chapter 6
anyone holds Madhyamaka texts [in Tibet] in high esteem is also [one of the signs] of my having
served the doctrine
34o
."
As Karma ba dKon gzhon
341
said: "These days in the snow mountains the wise as well as the
foolish all make a big deal about Madhyamaka. It is thanks to Red mda' ba. Previously342 in
Thang sag
343
there was [ only] a corpse of the Madhyamaka. I have never heard [anyone] saying
that anyone else had it. "344
[In the epilogue to Red mda' ba's commentary on the Madhyamakiivatiira] it is said:
345
"(1) Although there appeared many scholars who explained the meaning of siltras,
in the countries of India, Nepal and Tibet,
For most of them, their learnedness was mostly skill at applying sense anceptually.
but not the sense of reality.
(2) The One who unmistakenly propounds the doctrine of the Muni
according to his intended meaning is Arya Nagiirjuna.
And the expert who distinguishes his views and scriptures exactly as they are, which are like a
garden of very white jasmine
346
, is the glorious Candra[kirti].
(3) It is [often] stated: 'These are the thoughts of those teachers.'
But although there are many seeming scholars, to whom among them are the[se thoughts]
[really] comprehensible?
What difference does a colorful, clear picture (S284) make
(lOb) to people who are blind from birth?
(4) Like a blind person who has discovered (5Ib) a jewel mine,
although I do not have the eyes of a pure Arya,
due to the blessing of the Victor and the Victor's children
I myself found this path of the profound dependent arising."
In a praise [by] BIo [bzang] it is said:
"Follower of the tradition of the Muni who possesses the ten powers,
Introducer of the vehicle that is free of the [two] extremes, Ornament of the world,
You who hold the lineage of the Sugata,
You are the only one who has realized
the tradition of both Nagiirjuna and Candrakirti in the way they have accepted it."
[B: A Dharma lord] says:
"(1) Having left the precipices of extreme views far behind,
you have gone forth by means of the middle way,
that is the track left by the passing of the sugatas of the three times' ,
and that liberates f r o ~ the fear of[wrongly] grasping [the subject and object],
English Translation
(2) In this degenerate age
347
, when sentient beings who are drunk on the
beer of evil notions quarrel about the meaning of true nature,
[if] anyone annihilates all elaborations and perfectly understands
the profound meaning of emptiness; this sort of thorough analysis is amazing."
213
[2.5.9 Empowerments, Explanations on Tantras, and Instructions and Tantric Writings]
Then, after the great being [Red mda' ba] had thought that he should enter the peak of all
vehicles, the Vajrayana, he received from the mighty Mahasiddha [Lo chen] Byang chub rtse
m0
348
some empowe=ents (dbang) such as Guhyasamaja
349
, and so on. He also
received the secret name Mi skyod rdo rje He received [explanation on the]
tantras from Lo tsaba Nam [mkha'] bzang [po] (b. 1359)350, and he received oral instructions
[for practice] from The Dharma Lord Grags pargyal mtshan
351
. From the glorious Bla rna dam
pa [bSod nams rgyal mtshan] he received Hevajra
352
and some other empowe=ents. From Lo
tsa ba sKyabs mchog dpal [bzang] (b. 14th cent.)353 (S285) he received explanations on the tan-
tra.
354
From Master dPalldan [Tshul khrims] (1333-1399) he received oral instructions on Path
with the Fruit (Lam 'bras l55 together with the major and minor Dharma protectors and their reti-
nues. From Sa bzang [Ma til PaJ;! chen (1294-1376) (11.) he received some empowe=ents such
as CakrasaI]1vara
356
. From The Dharma Lord [Lo chen] sKyabs mchog dpal bzang he received
[Abhayakaragupta's] Vajriivali
357
as well as [instructions on the practice connected with] Guhya-
samaja]maiijuvajra
358
, Lokesvara and the Sa skya father tantra ofVajrakumara.
[Furthe=ore he received] all the Indian commentaries related to Nagfujuna's tradition: the Five
Stages (Paiicakrama) compiled by Arya Nagarjuna as well as [his] Summarized Stages (PilJrji-
krama)359, the Caryameliipakapradipa
360
(52.) compiled by Aryadeva, the nluminating Lamp
(PradipoddyotanaY61, [a commentary on the] Guhyasamaja[tantra] composed by the glorious
Candra[kIrti], and so on. And [moreover, he received] the intended meaning of the early Guhya-
samaja traditions of King Indrabhi1t?62 and others condensed into one, Two Handsful of Flowers,
a root text with attached commentary composed by Sarrtipa
363
, the Samantabhadrasiidhana
364
compiled by [Sangs rgyas] Ye shes zhabs, The Four Hundred MaIJrjalas
365
together with a
commentary composed by DlpaI]1kara[B:bhadra], the commentary [on the three lineages of
Guhyasamaja ]366 by Sthagana
367
, the commentary by linadatta
368
and so on. He perfectly investi-
gated the Indian commentaries on the three SrI Guhyasamaja traditions, and the Tibetan com-
mentaries by the three [persons] rJ e 'Gos, bDog, and by Klan as well as the good explanations
369
of the Sa skya uncle and nephew [i.e., bSod nams rtse mo (1142-82) and Sa skya PaJ;!gita
370
,] and
ofBu ston Rin chen grub (1290-1364y71 etc. And after he had taken to heart all the words as
well as the whole meaning of the Commentary on the Sri Guhyasamiijatantra (Sriguhyasamiija-
tantravivaral;a)372 together with its sub-commentaries, he became a great holder of the Vajra-
[yarra], compiled a commentary on the [Guhyasamaja] root tantra Sriguhyavajra
373
, [a com-
mentary] on the Clear Realization (mngon rtogs, abhisamayay74 [ofthe deity], on self-empower-
ment (bdag jug) and on [arranging] a garland, i.e., rows of offerings (mchod phrengr
S
as well
as a summarizing overview of the five stages (rim lnga'i bsdus dony76 and other works (S286).
214 Chapter 6
It is said:
"(1) And then, following the Aryavajra oral instructions
[B: and] other explanatory tantras
377
,
the summarized great tantra was explained
in five stages by the glorious Candraklrti.
(2) And following the oral instructions on the tantras by ancient [masters]
and the late (lib) tantras,
the meaning of the tantra [and] the four branches of approach and accomplishment
378
were explained by Ratnakarasanti
379
.
(3) According to the oral instructions by Maiijusrl
the meaning of the tantra in three aspects - the creation stage,
the completion stage, and the drops (bindu) -
has been shown by Buddhajnanapada
380
.
(4) Marvelous was the meaning I found
in the great Guhyasamaja tantra's381 trail,
cleared by Arya [Nagarjuna] and [ other] scholars,
divided into three stages."
In a praise by Blo [bzang grags pal it is said:
"(1) The summit of all the enumerations
of dharmas taught by the great Muni,
which is the ultimate section of the Sri Guhyasamiijatantra
fixed
382
in the six dimensions and the four modes
383
, is the vajrapiida
384

(2) Because after you explained well how it is, [we] enjoyed the happiness
385
of the highest [level of! concentration of the two stages, (
I purposely follow you, protector
86
,
who are also given the name 'Holder of the Vajra[dhara]'."
[2.5.10 Praise of his Main Teachers]
He studied respectfully with the aforementioned masters. Thus he said:
"Crownjewel of the nine types of sentient beings387, Dharma Lord [Bla rna dam pa] bSod [nams]
rgyal [mtshan],
Son of the Victor, Thogs med bzang po dpal,
[Sa bzang] Ma ti Pal). chen, PaI).chen Byang [chub] rtse [mol,
Highest of scholars, Nya dbon Kun dga' [dpal], and so forth.
There are twelve
388
masters whose grace I received,
for a long time I made great efforts and respectfully studied with them."
English Translation
215
He held the abovementioned priitimok,Ja, bodhisattva and vidyadhara
389
vows together with their
secondary rules, (8287) even more dear than his life. Thus [Rt<d mda' ba] said:
"0) After I myself iook ordinatioI). in the doctrine of the Buddha,
[and] until I knew how to distinguish between right and wrong,
whatever physical, verbal or mental conduct I performed,
I collected my thought with great attention and practiced in accord with the teachings (12a) of the
Muni.
(2) Even in the event that I did anything inappropriate
due to the strong force of afflictions, to which I am accustomed since beginningless time,
in that very moment I called it to mind as if having eaten
390
poison,
[and] with a mind of regret, I once again acted in accordance with the Dharma."
In a praise by The Dharma Lord [to Red mda' ba] it is said:
"The assertions of others are like drawings in water.
Even [if there are] plenty [of them] one can let [them] disappear immediately.
[But] you[r theses] are like drawings written in stone.
Even if you are going to die, you would not change your theses into something else. "391
[2.5.11 Position as a Holder ofthe Esoteric, Madhyamaka and Yogacara Lineages]
The great being [Red mda' ba] is a unsurpassab1e holder of the tradition of the Muni: In the
lineage
392
of the blessing through practice
393
he came as the 19th [Lama] beginning with Vajra-
dhara.
394
In the lineage of the profound view beginning with the Teacher [Buddha Siikyamuni],
he came as the 22nd.
395
And in the lineage of the vast conduct beginning with the Teacher
[Buddha Saykamuni] he came as the 27th.396 Thereafter he spread and made flourish the lineage
of advice
397
and the lineage of practice of all three of them. 398
[2.6 Verse 6: Defeating the Wrong Views of Eternalism and Nihilism]
[6] After you had learnt well all siitras, tantras and treatises,
you demolished through perfect scriptures and through reasoning [that uses] the power of
fact
all the tenets [holding] the extreme views of eternalism and nihilism.
I pay homage to you who defeated the wrong views.
Concerning these [words]: He had learnt well the abovementioned siitras, tantras and treatises.
Therefore [he] said:
"Having thoroughly studied all the treatises from India (53.), that were translated [into Tibetan],
as well as most of the siitra and tantra sections,
(8288) [I] attained a fearless confidence to reveal [my] own tenet and those of others
in front of many scholars."
216
Chapter 6
[2.6.1 Dispute with the Jo nang pa and Writing ofthe Kalacakra Commentary]
Although right from the beginning this great being [Red mda' ba] had esteem for the Omniscient
Bu ston Rin po che (1290-1364), because of the influence of his teachers, friends and so on, he
became much acquainted with the tenets
399
(12b) of the Omniscient [Dol po pa Shes rab rgyal
mtshan (1292-1361)]400. And then, thinking that he should rely on the [texts that] support the Jo
nang pa tenets, which are the Kiilacakratantra, [three sutras, i.e.,] the MahiiparinirviilJa-, the
SaIJ1dhinirmocana- and the Lmikiivatiirasiitra
401
, as well as the [Mahiiyiina}uttaratantrasiistra
402
and the Dharmadhiitustotra
403
etc., he obtained an unmistaken understanding of them. Then he
thought that he should establish this tenet system of the Jo nang pa in a deeply rooted way, [but
still] indecisive he went to Brag kha
404
, [and again] investigated those siltras, the [Kiilacakra)-
tantra and the [respective] treatises three times. First he thought that it was certain that the tenets
of the Jo nang pa [reflect] the thought of those sutras, the [Kiilacakra}tantra and the treatises.
During a second [reading], he had a doubt arise as to whether it did or not. And the third time he
said that [the Jo nang pa] had a wrong understanding, [and that their tenets differ] from the
intended meaning [of those scriptures]. 405
Then, in the main seat
406
[of Sa skya], he approached [his teacher] mKhan chen Sangs rgyas
'phel and reported to him: "I thought that the tenets of the Jo nang pareflect the intended mean-
ing of the [relevant] slUras, tantras and treatises, and investigated them thoroughly, but it is [an
understanding] that [has gone] outside
407
their intended meaning." Thereupon [mKhan chen pa]
replied: "Since you are a famous scholar, [this must be] very true," and laughed (ironically).
At that time [Red mda' ba] composed a Letter to the [Great} Teacher (i.e., to the Buddha/OS,
which mKhan chen[Nya dbon Kun dga' dpal] did not like at all (S289). He harbored a grudge
409
because [of it].
Then the great being [Red mda' ba] thought: "mKhan chen Nya dbon pa is very intelligent and
an excellent scholar in the field ofPramfu).a. On the strength ofthls, ifI bring to his attention the
refutations and proofs of scripture and reasoning, it is certain that he will change [his
position ].410 Ifhe changes from within, through a change [that comes] from the river at '01 kha41
1
[upstream the gTsangpo to Sa skya], all the Jo nangpa of (53 b) today will be converted." (l3a) He
[then] went to rTse chen [monastery]412, into the presence of Ny a dbon. But since due to the
fo=er dispute [Redmda' ba] had the advantage over him, although [Nya dbon] did not directly
criticize [him], he showed with many gestures that he was displeased [with him]. And therefore
[Red mda' ba] thought: "IfI tell him now, it will be useless." Thus he went back to the main seat
[Sa skya] and composed the Jewel Rosary: A Letter to the Holders of the Doctrine
413
And al-
though [at that time] in the Snow Mountains those who pretended to be Kalacakra practitioners
and especially the Jo nang pa [Nya dbon Kun dga' dpal] and his followers were unable to debate
with him directly, secretly, in their minds, they felt greatly disturbed.
[2.6.2 Debate with Karma dKon mchog gzhon nu in Sa skya]
At that time, outnumbered by all the Tripitaka holders of the great main seat, [Sa skya], chaired
by Drung bZhi thog pa [Ta dben Kun dga' rin chen (1339-1399)]414, the great being [Red mda'
English Translation
217
ba] said in front of this [assembly]: 'The KaIacakra[tantra] is contradictory." Karma ba dKon
gzhon said: "There are no contradictions." And then on the occasion of a debate, Karma ba
[dKon gzhon] said:. "[Take] an object of knowledge as the subject (chos can, dharmin). It [ab-
surdly] follows that 'Pul,1garika
415
is foolish, because the quotation 'I the foolish wish to practice
it,416 is the unmistaken speech of The Lord of the Ten Stages
4l7
The predicate (gsal ba, vyakta)
and the pervasion (khyab pa, vyiipti) are accepted.418 The reason (rtags, linga) is established
4I9
,
because this is a phrasing from the system of the tantric commentary Stainless Radiant Light
itself."
In response to this the great being [Red mda' ba] said [to Karma ba dKon gzhon, giving an
example]: "[Take] 'an object of knowledge' as the subject42o. It follows that on the occasion of
the debate as to whether sound (S290) is permanent or impermanent, [B: that sound] is the proof
(sgrub byed, siidhana) for 'sound is permanent'421, because [likewise] on the occasion of the
debate as to whether the tantric commentary Stainless Radiant Light is the speech of The Lord
ofthe Ten Stages or not, 'the phrasing from the system of the tantric commentary Stainless Ra-
diant Light itself is the proof that the tantric commentary Stainless Radiant Light is the speech
of The Lord of the Ten Stages. You are refuted."422 Moreover [Red mda' ba] composed a letter
to Master Shar Chung ba
423
and others (l3b) in which he said: "Although debates have taken
place, we didn't do better than the proof being equivalent to the probandum."
From the Jo nang pa side, a tantric practitioner (54.) said [to Red mda' ba]: "You are a great
scholar, and it is not appropriate that [you] refute KaIacakra." In reply to this he said:
"Refutations and proofs of the discourses of the Sugata are made by scholars. What does it
concern a dog, when a human is like a felt."
[2.6.3 Debate with and Conversion of the Jo nang pal
At that time, all the Jo nangpa, headed by mKhan chen bsTanrgyal ba, after discussing [among
themselves], started [preparing] many scriptural quotations and reasonings: '1fhe says this, we
say this.' And then they told 'Jam dbyangs chen p0424: "Invite Acarya gZhon [nul blo [gros] [to
come] here [to Jo nang monastery]." They told him that the debate would be about the inter-
pretable and defInitive Buddlla nature (tathiigatagarbha), and thus invited the great being [Red
mda' ba] together with his disciples from Sa skya.425 At the time of the debate, the great being
[Red mda' ba] said, "When we debate, we do it either based on the tantras, or on the slUras, or
on the treatises. We will not make a debate that pleases the foolish, in which we mix all of them
up with one another."426 And 'Jam dbyangs pa also said that the same would be acceptable for
him. [But] thereupon [the Jo nang masters], although all the scriptural quotations and reasonings
[that they] had discussed in private collapsed, still accepted that there is no difference between
the defIled and undefIled suchness (tathatii) (S291) and that the Buddha nature, which is adorned
by the unproduced good qualities such as the [ten] powers, etc.427, exists ultimately428 [B:
permanent, stable and unchanging].429
To this the great being [Redmda' ba] answered: "[Take] the object of knowledge as the subject.
It follows that the permanent and stable Buddha nature is not truly existent
430
, because ultimately
218
Chapter 6
it is neither one nor many431. The predicate is accepted. If [you say] the reason is not established,
[you lose, because,] if [Buddha nature] were to established as one, you would lose, [because in
this case] it necessarily does not exist as many, (14a) [and] if [Buddha nature] were to'be
established as many, you would lose, [since in this case] it necessarily does not exist as one. "432
Moreover [rJe bstun Red mda' ba said:] "[Take] the object of knowledge as the subject. It fol-
lows that it is not appropriate to give up the mind that grasps the Buddha nature as truly ex-
istent
433
, because that [Buddha nature] is truly existent
434
." To this [the Jo nang] Acarya BIo gros
rdo rje [replied]: "[Take] the object of knowledge as the subject. It follows that it is not ap-
propriate to give up the mind that grasps [the tathiita] as.free of conceptual elaboration, because
it is free from conceptual elaboration. This 'three-part set' [of factors that are needed for a
perfect syllogism: reason, predicate, and pervasion t
35
have been [fully] accepted [by you]." To
this [rJe bstun Red mda' pa said]: "These are words that just [sound] similar, [but] they have no
(S4b) meaning."
Due to these many scriptural quotations and reasonings people who had earlier converted to the
tenet of the Jo nang pa returned. And those who kept fOllowing it started to have doubts. Those
who w ~ r e [still} outside [it, Red mda' ba] prevented from entering.
436
[2.6.3.1 Attitude towards KiilacakraJ
Although in the snow mountains it is widely held that the great being [Red mda' ba] said:
"IGlacakra is not Dharma," what he really said was: "There are inner contradictions [within the
SrI Kiilacakra] and that it is not to be taken as literal (sgra ji bzhin pa)437." He did not say: "It is
not Dharma." With regard to this debate [he says438]: "However, regardless whether [this text]
was composed by the Arya
439
or not, since we see a lot of elegant sayings [in this tantra], this is
why I do not categorally criticize it by saying that it should never be the ford for those who are
wishing for liberation." And in his Removal of Contradictions
440
[Red mda' ba] says: "These
days, seeming scholars of the snow mountains teach in a profound way (S292) with ambitious
speech. They are clinging to the literal [meaning]441 of the words of the Kiilacakratantra and its
commentaries. Therefore:
After seeing the spreading of so many wrong dharma systems,
that are in contradiction to the collection of pure siitras and tantras,
sincerely, as if straightening a crooked stick
442
,
I wrote this myself by analyzing and issuing rebuttals."
And in [his] Elucidation a/the Definite Meaning
443
, [rJe btsun Red mda' ba says:]
"(1) The other scholars who made commentaries on this point,
(14b) after they had discarded the essence, again and again they lifted up chaff.
Like the nectar [that appear,ed] after churning the ocean,
I myself took the essence of the perfect meaning.
(2ab) From the g a r d e ~ of the one hundred-petaled 10tuses
444
, bees take the honey.
Water and milk will be [easily] distinguished by geese."
English Translation
219
[A: To be continued later ....
It is well known that earlier, when the world came about, the gods and demi-gods made Mount
Meru
445
into a churning stick. The Naga-King Nor rgyas
446
was made into a churning rope, and
then, while the ocean was being churned, three [things] appeared: a jar full of nectar, a jar full of
hala-poison
447
and a half-moon. At that time the nectar was carried [away] by the gods. The
poison was drunk by Mahesvara (i.e., Siva), whereupon his throat became black, and the half-
moon became the crown ornament [of the god] Devendra
448
, [Le., Siva or Indra]. Similarly the
Jo nang pa drank some of the poison that appeared from churning the Kalacakra ocean. The
scholar Zha lu ba and other (55a) infants made the half moon of interpretative meaning their
ornament of joy. I myselftook the definite meaning of the nectar.
449
Continued from above .... J
"(2cd) A skilled trader
450
recognizes a [spurious] glass jewel
451
.
(S293) The mind of a scholar realizes [which are] elegant sayings [and which are] incorrect
explanations.
(3) The existing elegant sayings have been covered by the darkness of jealousy, [and]
non-existent faults are seen by the wrong-minded with their eyes.
Like a poisonous snake that is drinking milk,
through the nectar of elegant sayings the poison of afflictions increases
(4) [in] the wrong-minded, who flow down with the current of a river of elegant sayings
[and whose wrong views] cannot be counteracted by a thousand dam-like elegant sayings.
[Hence] I composed this [text], thinking that if some [ofthose] who have an
impartial mind see it, it may find their approval."
Accordingly,if [the Kalacakratantra or the Vimalaprabha] were in confirmity with the thoughts
of all those siitras, tantras and treatises, how could it be stopped? Earlier, [the thesis that] the
dharmakaya [is] permanent, stable and unchanging was not accepted at all in India, Tibet or
Nepal, and it is forbidden again now, in order to prevent [people from] continuously entering
into [such] wrong views.
It is said:
"(I) There is no enemy greater than wrong views, which ruin
the foundation of all good qualities - the seed of happiness -
[which] steal the most precious gem of right views and
[which] cut offthe vital lifeline to liberation.
(2) Being attached to inferior wrong views,
proclaiming the extremes of eternalism and nihilism with the loud voice of a fox,
even if they uphold the banner of saffron [robes],
they are heretics (tlrthikas), who augur badly for the doctrine of the Muni."
220 Chapter 6
[2.6.3.2 Conversion a/a Jo nangpa after a Failed Attempt on Red mda' ba's Life]
At that time, a passionate
452
(ISa) J 0 nang pa said that if anybody could refute [him], they should
come forward. After [he] heard it said that: "Acarya gZhon [nul blo [gros] and his disciples are
coming," [this] Jo nang pa thought, "I don't [care] whether [this] one person exists or not. If [I]
kill him, the door will be locked for the enemies of the J 0 nang pa." Hence he made a commit-
ment to throw a stone at his head.453 [But] when he met the Honorable One
454
, his body was
paralyzed. He lost consciousness and [thus] did not strike [him]. When he regained conscious-
ness, he felt that [gZhon nu blo gros] was a brilliant scholar (dge bshes}.Lateritbecame known
that after he had developed faith in the Honorable One, he openly expressed and confessed [his
mistakes] and made offerings to him.
[B: After 'Bri khung 10 tsa ba
455
had become a passionate J 0 nang pa too, when he was preparing
a fire
456
[on] a stone slab to burn the great being [Red mda' ba] [in an effigy] [with] a sacrifice
ofburnt-offerings
457
, he had a direct vision of a white person in the sky. [That person said to
him]: "Even if you burn him, he will not be burnt. Don't make your great karmic results into
incense It is said that he had to stop doing459 it as soon as this had been said.]
(S5b) In bZang ldan [monastery t
60
[Red mda' ba] was told by the bKa' bcu pa Yon tan
461
: "Since
you have criticized the Jo nang pa it seems that you will incur great sin." On this the great (8294)
being [Red mda' ba] replied in his speeches: "There are extremely many who say this: How
could this be? Formerly, when the teacher [Buddha Siikyamuni] came to the world, did [he,] the
teacher also incur great sin because Devadatta and so on, 'the Maras, and all [B: the non-
Buddhists
462
] such as the six, three and eighteen heretics (tirthikas) generated immeasurable
hatred
463
and anger
464
[towards him]? Thereafter, when the Six Omaments
465
and the Two
Highest [masters in the Vinaya
466
] and so forth came [to this all those who are on the
dark side, i.e., all who behave sinfully, were displeased. Did those [eight masters] incur those
sins too? Especially (lSb) after Arya Nagarjuna had come, in order to introduce the Mahayana
system he said: 'The happiness of onself and others, the Mahayana, is not the word [of the
Buddha].' Did also the supreme Arya Nagiirjuna incur the sin of slander? At the time, when the
sphere of the sun arises, all screech owls
467
become blind. This is the nature of phenomena. If
one puts a plumb line straight, one avoids getting crooked. That is the custom. Don't say foolish
things like that."
[Sa paI).] says in his Clear Differentiation a/the Three Vows:
"(1) Due to the arrival of the Buddha in this world,
and to the explanations that all the scholars make,
three types of results come into being.
This is the general system of the Buddha's doctrine.
468
(2) When all the scholars teach the Dharma,
it defeats those who engage in incorrect Dharma practice.
All the demonic forces are saddened.
All the scholars are pleased.
English Translation
221
(3a) By such means it is possible to keep up the Buddha's doctrine."469
When observing it [philosophically], [you] accept the dharrnakiiya as permanent and stable.
When meditating, {you] enjoy whatever appears as the dharmakiiya.
All those who are endowed with'a dharmakiiya have a body,
[and] wander in the karmic cycle of existence. How wonderful!
[B: !470 These are verses that need to be seen in context.]
[2.6.4 Debate with g.Yag pa Sangs rgyas dpal as to Whether Sa1p.slira Has an End]
When mKhan chen g. Y ag pa [Sangs rgyas dpal]47I said, "There is no end to all sentient beings
becoming awakened and to the cycle [ of existence] (8295)," the great being [Red mda' ba] replied
to this statement: "It [absurdly] follows that all sentient beings will certainly be awakened
through valid cognition, because valid cognition is established with regard to them." Thereupon
g.Yag pa countered: "The pervasion is not established."472 And although 'the reason is not
established' and many other propelling answers were given, it is widely known that all the
scholars (56a) who rely on meaning favored the reasoning of the great being [Red mda' ba].473
And the scholars who rely on words favored the reasoning ofmKhan chen g.Yag pa.
474
[2.6.5 Debate with Karma ba dKon gzhon as to whether Conventional Existence Really
Counts as Being Existent or not]
When the two, The Dharma Lord Lo tsa ba [sKyabs mchog dpal bzangt
75
and Karma ba dKon
gzhon, debated (I6a) whether conventional existence really counts as being existent or not, the
debate became worthless. And Lo tsa ba said: "This debate will make no sense. The words are
without [B: the slightest] essence. Hence it will be boring for the honorables, and also the rest
will lose enthusiasm
476
. Therefore leave!" Then the great being [Red mda' ba] said: "Honorable
bored ones, may I debate?" After he had dispelled the contradiction in the syllogism, all shared
the perception that he had struck the Karma ba to the core.
The Honorable One
477
said: "Even if those who are known as great scholars in dBus and gTsang
contradict themselves with regard to the meaning, and their words are only partly correct, we do
not debate [them], but say, '[They] are in accordance with the tenet.' [But] if [they express the]
same meaning with slightly different words, [we] debate [on it until our] heads throb. This does
not make any sense. Even the honorable Lo tsa ba478, without having examined through
reasoning, does not say that conventional existence does not count as being existent. Ifhe were
to say so, [his view] would have turned into the extreme view of nihilism. Also the Karma ba, .
after having examined by reasoning (8296) too, does not accept that if something exists
conventionally, it counts as being existent. If he were to accept this, [his view] would have
turned into the extreme view of eternalism. There is no need for dogs to quarrel over an empty
feeding bowl."
[2.6.6 The Views of the Six Greatest Indian Masters and on Dar ma rin chen]
At that time the people who had listened [to this debate] said: "[If one] goes to serve [one's]
spiritual teacher, the capacity of one's own intelligence will blossom. It is very marvelous."
222 Chapter 6
[They] had become completely filled with faith. sTag lung 10 tsa ba Siilcya bzang
479
sent a 'Mas-
ter of the Four Scriptures' (bKa' bzhi pa), who then said [to Red mda' ba]: "I accept the views
of the Six Omaments
480
as being the same. Do you accept this likewise?" Thereupon [Red mda'
ba] replied: "There is no certainty [that the views of the Six Ornaments are the same]. Some are
same and some are not the same."
Because [Red mda' ba] was persistently asked: "Since you are a great scholar, you must give
decisive advice," (l6b) [he finally] said: "To be sure, whether the intended meanings are the same
(56b) or not, you will know from this: Acarya Nagarjuna and his [spiritual] son [A.ryadeva] and
their followers refute the system of Asanga and his brother [Vasubandhu] and their followers.
[And] Asanga and his brother [Vasubandhu] and their followers refute the system of Acarya
Nagarjuna and his spiritual son [A.ryadeva] and their followers. This can be understood by
thinking about it. Overall, if the tenets of the Madhyamikas and the Realists
481
are the same,
[then] who are those who are said not to have the same views?" He laughed loudly.
Thereupon [this was reported to] the Master ofthe Ten Scriptures Dar rna Erin chenj482 and [he]
said: "That 'result sign ofbelief
483
[stated] by Bla rna Rinpoche seems to be true." Thereupon
[Dar rna rin chen said to Red mda' ba:] "Say it again!" [Red mda' ba] repeated [his] statement
and thereupon [Dar rna rin chen] said: "If that tenet is accepted, [your] talk will become
inauspicious
484
." [Red mda' ba] said: "May it become."
Thereafter [Red mda' ba] was reported: "When making prayers, the power is great. It cannot be
reversed by logic (3297)." [Therupon Red mda' ba said:] "Well then, if that is the case, wait one
[moment]!" Being propelled by one syllogism, the 'three-part set':85 became direct contradic-
tory, [B: and] he said: "Those who thought this over for months and years will instantly run in
the opposite [direction]."
At that time all the scholars of dBus said: "Blo bzang [grags] pa had a vision ofthe face ofMa-
iijusrI. Wherever he goes, he takes fourteen big and small mdzo-Ioads of scriptures [with him]
and studies them day and night without [any break], and when the tenets [he learned from these
scriptures] are recited by a good recitor like Dar rna Erin chen], [Red mda' ba] annihiliates them
instantly [with one syllogism]. It is terrifying." [All] were astonished.
[2.6.7 Criticism of bKa' brgyud Yogis as Nihilists and Practicers ofthe Meditation of
Hva ~ a n g Mahayana]
In former lives the Lord of the Yogis, the great Mi la ras pa, and a few other previous [practi-
tioners of] mahamudra frequently trained [in tantric practices]. And also in this life they were
able to bring air and mind under their control (l7a). But if you [think] that you may do whatever
you like, [ or] whatever [you] do is fine, this creates a base of confusion in the behavior of a yogi.
Nowadays most meditators of mahamudra say: "The tradition of all the noble beings who
consider the highest training in moral discipline to be important is the tradition of the hearers."
Having despised [the teaching of the Buddha in this way,] (57.) although they literally say "all
phenomena in satpsara and nirv1i.r;ta are empty and without self," in fact [their views] are not even
slightly effective as an antidote to the grasping of 'I' and 'mine.' These [views] are [extreme]
English Translation
223
views ofnihilism
486
. And after having despised [moral] conduct through [such] views, the only
nihilistic view is to eagerly undertake careless
487
conduct. When one examines these [views]
with the wisdom of individual examination
488
, [one sees] that meditating on the essence of the
mode of existence leads to a faulty conceptual meditation and [thus] having stopped all mental
activities, when meditating on non-conceptual dullness (S298), although it appears as if the
meditation that one is doing is without fault, this system has turned out to be external to the
[Buddha's] doctrine, as it is said in the Samiidhiriijasutra
489
:
"(1) Even if [all] the worldly people meditate on meditative stabilization,
this cannot destroy the grasping of the '1.'
It will increasingly stir up the afflictions.
Udraka meditated on meditative stabilization in this way.
(2) If one individually examines phenomena as being without self
[and] continually meditates on that,
this is a cause for attaining the result, nirvfu;ta;
[the afflictions] will never be calmed by any other cause."
[Red mda' ba] said: "Those who after having stopped mindfulness and attentiveness, stare wide-
eyed
490
in the darkness and engage in sudden
49
! meditation, and do not pay attention [to] any sign
[that appears], and when suddenly any discursive thought
492
appears, (17b) they entirely cut it off,
then they are upholding the unmistaken tradition of the Chinese monk Hva ~ a l l g Mabayana (Ho-
shang Mo_ho_yen)."493 Nowadays among a few great meditators there are many who say much
too easily: "I can grasp the existence of the intermediate state."494 [Hence Red mda' ba] said: "If
appearances during the day have been grasped as truly existent
495
, the mistaken [appearance]
during a dream will not be grasped. Unless the dream is grasped, the mistalcen appearance of the
intermediate state will not be grasped. Although one may hope that objects of enjoyment such as
food and drink (grog) will fall into the mouth of a corpse, this will not happen."496 Being refuted
by these and many other quotations and reasonings, [people who had] earlier followed [tins
tenet] returned. And those who continued to follow it began to have doubts. Those who were
[still] exterior [to it] were prevented [by Red mda' ba] from entering.
It is said:
"(1) Abiding in the ocean of having given up both extremes
the king ofthe serpents
497
, (57b) Nagarjuna, upholds the tradition.
Even a thousand-petalled opponent
498
cannot rival
the brilliance of the blazing of my view's rays.
(2) Even having (S299) quotations and reasonings that are [as powerful as] thousands of thunder-
bolts made of meteoric iron
499
,
which destroy the high mountain ofthe [defiled] view of the transitory constituents
50o
,
what can I do for these sentient beings,
who wear the very hard and sturdy armor of ignorance?"
224 Chapter 6
In a praise, [B: Chos] [rje] says:
"Even while you debate, you are pure, and
through your vast and impartial
501
intelligence
502
[you] completely defeat the other side;
you are never endowed with any unstability."
And [he 1 says:
"You defeat the proponents of wrong [views]
on all occasions of refutation
503
, [and] when due to a fault in a syllogism
a mistake [appears to us] as a good quality, and
a good quality appears [to us] as a mistake,
you clearly distinguish between correct and
apparent and also teach [us] well,
and stop [all of us] from going in this wrong [direction]."
And [The Dharma Lord further] says:
"(1) By loudly proclaiming emptiness [with] a (lSa) lion's roar, and
widely opening the incisor and claws of quotations and reasoning,
[Red mda' ba] subdued wrong proponents, [who are like] a pack of foxes,
[and now he] is upholding well the doctrine of the supreme Muni [in the] snow mountains.
(2) Hence, although right now all over this part of the earth
504
,
there seem to be many who pretend to be great,
all those who have an impartial mind will ascertain that
this great-minded [Red mda' ba] is the sole ornament of this world."
[2.7 Verse 7: Skill in Means to Gather Disciples and Writings]
[7] With the qualities of [being trained in] the scriptures and [having attained] realizations,
and with skill in means and with compassion,
knowing the disposition, thinking and latent tendencies of your disciples
as they are, [you] turned the Wheel of Dharma,
I pay homage to you who take [us] fortunate [disciples] under your care.
Concerning these [words]:
Accordingly [Red mda' ba] possesses the excellent qualities shown above of [knowing] quota-
tions and reasonings [and possessing] as well [the qualities of] great compassion and skill in
means as to how to take others under one's care. Hence he knows the dispositions of disciples
[towards] which class (gotraY05 each of them [is inclined], Mahayana or HInayana; he knows
their thinking, i.e., the sharpness and weakness of their faculties, and he knows exactly their
latent tendencies (S300), to which stronger or weaker part of their afflictions they tend. And thus
he turned the Wheel of Dharma in accordance with how their fortune was, Mahayana or
English Translation
225
Hinayana. He taught them the profound and vast Dhanna in detail, middle [length] or condensed
(58a), exactly as they needed, such as the Tripitaka. After having shown [them] liberation
S06
[through both] ripenIng and freeing and [having shown them] the unmistaken path of
omniscience, from the endless disciples he accepted, the following became the main ones:
[2.7.1 Main Disciples]
[1] the supreme in purification, Kun mkhyen Shes rab 'od [zer],
[2] the supreme [among] his [spiritual] sons, the glorious Blo bzang grags pa,
the supreme in being learned, the glorious Blo bzang grags pa,
the supreme in holding (l8b) the Vinaya (precepts], the glorious Blo bzang grags pa,
the supreme in exalted deeds, the glorious Blo bzang grags pa,
[3] the supreme in views, Gon gyo Nyi rna grags
507
,
[4] the supreme in practice, Kun dga' dpal bzang posos,
[5] the supreme of those endowed with compassion
so9
, dPal 'byor shes rab
SlO
,
[6] the supreme of those skillful in teaching, bSod nams shes rab,
[7] the supreme in good debate, Dar rna rin chen
S11
.
[These are the] seven mitra%12, who know all scriptural systems513.
[2.7.2 Disciples with the Title of a bKa' bcu pa]
The great bKa' bcu pa
S14
Nam mkha' byang 'chad
s1s
can be treated as being equal in status to
them [i.e., the seven main disciples].
Further there are such maters as:
bKa' bcu pa Mang ra ba Yon tan rgyal mtshan,
Bo dong bKa' bcu pa Grags pa tshul khrims,
Byang pa bKa' bcu pa [mKhas grub] dGe legs dpal [bzang]S16, and
gNas myini
17
bKa' bcu pa mChog grub;
[2.7.3 Disciples with the Title of a bKa' bzhi pal
[and such Masters of the Four Scriptures as:]
(1) mDo stod pa bKa' bzhi 'dzin pa sPre bo518 Thang bzang,
(2) gNyal gro Gar ba,
(3) Jo gdan
S19
mTshungs med,
(4) La stod pa mKhan chen Buddha srl
S20
,
(5) the great sTa steba
S21
Byang [chub] bsod [nams],
(6) the great Bo dong pa Byang [chub] (8301) rgyal [mtshan],
(7) Blo [gros] brtan (pa],
(8) bZang ldan pa Don 'grub rin chen,
226 Chapter 6
(9) Ngam rings pa522 dKon mchog dar [rgyas],
(10) mNga' ris pa Yi dam dpaJ.
It is said that [there is] a set of ten holders of the bKa' bzhi [pa title], but others appear beyond
these, such as:
The lion proponent of quotations and reasoning sGra tshad pa523 Chos bzang,
Jo gdan Grags she
524
, and
sNgo phyi dbon po.
[2.7.4 Supreme Disciples among Those Learned in the Two Sulbjects Paramita and
Pramal]a]
There were also very many who knew Paramitii and PramiiIfa:
Supreme among the proponents of reasoning were:
Ri phug pa mKhan chen bsod nams skyabs,
dGa' ldan mKhan chen Sakya sri, and so forth.
There were also very many proponents of reasoning (58b) such as
sTod lung pa bSod [nams] byang [chub].
c
In addition there were many proponents of scriptures. They generated realizations (19a) merely
through the writings of the great being [Red mda' bal
[2.7.5 Supreme among Personal Disciples Who Have Taken Vows with Him]
Furthermore, those who had studied the writings of the great being [Red mda' ba] and who
became supreme among those who had taken vows from him (sdom phrug) were:
Bo dong mKhan chen Chos kyi rgyal mtshan, the victor over all directions,
Brag ram mKhan chen Chos rgyal
525
,
Ngam rings pa mKhan chen Rin chen dpal bzang,
The Master of the bZang ldan community, the great A.carya [Hor ston] Nam mkha' dpa1
526
,
La stod Nam mkha'i mal 'byor,
The Learned Dharma m Gon [po] seng [ge],
sTag tshang mKhan po Seng ge rgyal mtshan,
gSang phu Gling stod mKhan chen 'od chen pa,
[gSang phu] Gling smad
527
mKhan chen bSod nams 'phel,
The great holder of the bKa' bzhi [pa title] Nag rig,
The great teacher gNyal pa528,
rGyal dbang and so on,
most of the teachers of gSang phu and
dGa' ba gdong mKhan chen Bya yul Rin po che,
English Translation
LomKhanpo,
The two abbots of (S302) Byang Rwa sgreng529,
the chieftain of the three [monasteries] Glang
530
, Grag and Sher,
the abbot of sTag sna Chos lung,
the lamas from IHa bdun
531
etc.
227
These holders of the Pitaka from the direction ofmNga' ris532, the learned par;l.(;litas who are well-
known like the sun and the moon, are all his disciples.
[2.7.6 Supreme Disciples among the Practioners of Ku su lu Yoga and Resident
Disciples]
Among all the disciples who are practitioners of the hidden yoga ofKu su lu
533
, the supreme
were sGra tshad and so on. Although they had the quality of being leamed
534
, they guarded the
conduct ofKu su lu and made their mental continuum especially soft through altruism and bo-
dhicitta.
The Dharma Lord Jila na ba, and
mChog bzang Legs pa'i blo gros535, for whom the qualities of [understanding] quotations and
reasoning where a heavy burden, but who practiced attentively only the conduct of Ku su lu,
Bla ma rMi lam pa brTson ' grus seng ge
536
, who continually saw the face of Venerable Maiijusrl
and due to Ku su lu (19b) conduct, no longer distinguished between day and night, and
the bDag (59a) po'i bla ma from dBus, The Dharma Lord Rin bzang pa, and
Ne ring pa sGrub pa dpal, who renounced this life and made meditation the essence [of it],
and so forth.
These were [his] resident disciples, who were free from worldly activities.
[2.7.7 Supreme Disciples among Those Who Became Holders ofthe Vajrayana]
The supreme among those disciples, who became holders of the Vajra[yana] are:
mKhan chen bZang po rgyal mtshan of Sa skya Grang mo che,
The Dharma Lord Lam 'bras pa BIo bzang pa,
the great Holder of the Vajra[yana] Chos dpal bzang po,
the great Holder of the Vajra[yana] master bSod [nams] grags pa,
Master rGyal bzang, and
the Holder of the Mantra
537
Kun dga' zla ba and so forth.
He had very many disciples who were vidyiidharas. Moreover he had endless disciples who had
taken monastic ordination.
[2.7.8 Disciples of Exalted Birth]
His disciples of exalted birth due to their family, the father's line, the mother's line
538
or due to
the splendor of their merit, are:
228 Chapter 6
The owners of two thirds of this world (jambudvipa), the emanation of the Protector of the Three
Families
539
(S303), the noble nephew
540
and son of the three Dharma kings [of Tibet], the father
Khri rgyal bSod nams Ide (1371-1404)541 together with his wife and sons,
Master dBang sras born in the Sa skya 'l<hon family, the family which consists only of nobles,
a great teacher, who is like a powerful universal monarch, a sramaI).a born in the proximity542 of
the family line offorefather Se chen
543
rGyal po (1215-1294),
The rich
544
Ne'u governor Nam [mkha' bzang pO]545,
The devout Yon tan rgya mtsh0
546
,
The one of noble birth, 'U yug
547
lha btsun,
gNas rnying sTong dpon
548
rGyal bzang,
The powerful rGya chos stag the third,
l<hungs btsun mNga' ris, a minister from the Zhang family together with his entourage etc.
To an endless number of disciples, [Red mda' ba] taught the unmistaken method as to how to
achieve the causes for a higher rebirth and the results (20a) of definite goodness and so forth.
It is said:
"Kun mkhyen Shes rab 'od, Blo bzang grags pa and so on,
the seven spiritual guides
549
, who know the very many textual traditions,
ten excellent proponents of the Four Scriptures
550
,
and more than a hundred [disciples] who know the perfections (paramita) and valid cognition
(pramalJa) [well]."
[2.7.9 Survey of his Collected Works]
[2.7.9.1 Kalacakra Commentary]
(59b) Accordingly, for the benefit of the direct disciples, who were already following him, and
those disciples who would follow him in future, he composed as shown above those well
explained, [B: Precious] Rosaries
551

[2.7.9.2 Unit ofTen Commentaries]
"[Commentaries on] The Four Great Scriptures
552
that are the supreme ornaments that decorate
the world,
three on the Root Verses (Miilamadhyamakakarika), the Entrance to the Middle Way (Madhya-
makavatara) and the Four Hundred Verses (Catu/:tSataka), as well as one on the Higher Maha-
yana Teaching (Mahayanottaratantra/
53
,
[one] on the Treasury of Manifest Knowledge (Abhidharmakosa) [and one] on the Srz [Guhya]-
samiija[tantrap54 and so on [is the] unit of ten
S55
commentaries that comprise this scriptural
system."
English Translation
229
[2.7.9.3 Further Writings}
Although this is what is said, he [also] compiled [the following texts] that are not included in
that:
Commentary on ["Nagarjuna's"] &itrasamuccaya
556
;
[B: Commentary on [Nagarjuna's] Su/:lrZZekha
557
];
GuhyasamajamaJ}<;lala Ritual, Self-empowerment [and] (S304) [Arrangement of the] Rows of
Offerings558;
The Minor Collected Works, which are the essence of all sutras, tantras and treatises summarized
as precious oral instruction (man ngag) that is convenient to understand and easy to implement.
Fifty-five texts that exist in the form ofletters to teach the disciples who follow him.559
In a sutra, it is said:
"When the end of the [Ten] Five Hundreds comes,
I will remain in the form of [my] words."
In a praise [by Blo bzang] it is said:
"The wise lead [us] on a joyful path;
Learnedness is wealth that will never be wasted;
Its aim is to be accomplished and practiced.
Hence you have done for the disciples
everything that can be done.
I respectfully pay homage to you,
who has benefited us at all times."
[2.8 Verse 8: His Perfection of Wisdom and Realization of Emptiness in Four Stages]
[8] With the wisdom that realizes (20b) the state of being without self,
you see conventional dependent arising [to be] like an illusion,
and realize the ultimate state of phenomena [to be] like space.
I pay homage to you who have the perfect view.
Concerning these words: With his profound wisdom that realizes that all phenomena in sarpsara
and nirviiI}.a are empty and without self, he sees each of all the dependently originated
conventional things, which unexamined appear to be delightful, separate [from each otller],
unmixed, similar to an illusion and a dream; and [he is] endowed with the perfect view, which
found innate wisdom by understanding itself, [and that sees] the inexpressible meaning ofthe
ultimate truth, which is like the center of the space of dharmadhiitu.
56o
Thus [he said:] "I myself
experienced the way in which the realization of the middle way arises in four stages.
56l
Accordingly, first I understood the annihilation [of] emptiness, secondly appearance and
emptiness, [and] thirdly [I understood] dependent arising to be like an illusion; forth I
understood dependent arising as nominally existent without having any basis.
230
Chapter 6
Regarding this, the first [i.e., understanding the annihilation of emptiness
562
, is as follows]: (8305)
Like a jar that has been smashed with a hammer, the [wrong appearance that] conventional
[truth] is substantially existent was split apart through [analyzing its] emptiness by reasoning,
[and] again through analysis by reasoning, it turned away grasping at truth and functioned as a
cause for a mere appreciation of emptiness. 563
With regard to the second [i.e., understanding appeareance and emptiness]564, at the time when
the appearance [of conventional phenomena] appeared like an illusion, I realized its absence of
self-existence (rang bzhin med pa; nif:tsvabhiiva); although this [realization] turned away all con-
cepts of exaggeration and denigration of external objects, since I could not abandon the clinging
towards the mind that wishes for inner experiences, I could not go beyond the view of the
[proponents of the] false aspect of the mind-only school.
565
With regard to the third [i.e., understanding dependent arising as illusory], since both the mind
of inner experience and external objects depend on causes and conditions, I understood that
although conventionally they [exist] like illusions, they only exist as appearances, but do not
have the slightest self-existence. Hence, with regard to them, although [I did] not have any
clinging to grasping at extremes, [I still] had the grasping (21a) [at the view] that dependent phe-
nomena, which are real properties
566
, that do not depend on terms and concepts, exist as mere
(
illusions. Hence [my understanding] did not go beyond that of the Yogaciira [Svatantrika]
Madhyarnikas.
567
Regarding the fourth [i.e., understanding dependent arising as nominally existent without having
any basis], when I logically examined all phenomena in the way they exist, I could not find even
the slightest innate nature in it, and when I did not examine them, they became objects of
convention. Hence I realized them as labeled by conceptual thought and as labeled by mere
conventional designation
568
.
Likewise the mind that naturally realizes dependent arising without depending on the mind of
others is undeceived with regard to the mutual [ dependence] of cause and effect, and becomes
one that is free of all extremes of proliferations of [inter ]dependent eternalism and nihilism."
Although there are many who say: "This view that does not realize the mind of others as object
is a nihilistic view," this view that is free from all assertions is the unmistaken (60b) intended
(S306) meaning of the father NagiiIjuna and his [spiritual] son [Aryadeva]. Hence Arya Nagarjuna
himself said:
"If it were the case that I had some theses,
I would therefore have some faults.
If! have no thesis,
I am absolutely without any fault."569
Some say, "There is no autonomous thesis, but the thesis of one's own system does exist."
[They] also say, "This is just a difference in names, but in reality there is no difference at all."
[Red mda' ba]said: "Even those who considered other scholars' views to be v ~ r y good, after
English Translation 231
discussing self-grasping among themselves, just ended by putting it aside.
570
My view as well
will go with me. "571 This is absolutely true.
[2.8.1 Who Has the More Correct Prasangika View, Tsong kha pa or Red mda' ba?]
It is said that The Dharma Lord Blo bzang pa, after he had seen the face ofMaiijusri [in a vi-
sion],572 he asked him what he thought about [his] view of Madhyamaka, and thereupon [re-
ceived the answer] that he still had (21b) not understood it.
573
[Thereupon Tsong kha pa asked:]
"Well then, if this is the case, since you do not differentiate between spiritual teacher and disci-
ple, doesn't my teacher understand it either?" [Maiijusd] answered: "He does understand. [But
there are] some details that he does not understand." Although this became known, some of The
Dharma Lord's disciples, who were very passionate but had less wisdom, [believed: "Between]
the two, the [spiritual] father and [his spiritual] son, the view of The Dharma Lord [Blo bzang
grags] pa is superior, because he had seen the face ofMaiijusrL" But to say this is incolTect. Oth-
erwise the great scholar who had also become close friends, as if between two per-
sons, with Maiijusd, would have done more for the Buddha's doctrine than The Dharma Lord
[Blo bzang grags] pa. But it is known all over India and Tibet that did not realize
the [true] view of the Prasangikas, and he was in fact, as people say, the great trailblazer of the
Svatantrikas. There is no certainty that because [one] meets with an Arya directly [one's] view
is good, and because one does not meet, it is bad. (S307) Take Acarya Bhiivaviveka and Sri
Candraldrti as examples.
574
When [Red mda' ba] was told that there are people who say that the Honorable is a holder of a
nihilistic view, [he replied:] "Yes, that may be. In former times, when the Teacher [Buddha
Sakyamuni] came to this world, there have been [B: many] people, who said (61a) that SramaI]a
Gautama is a nihilist. Thereafter it happened that people spoke similarly about the [spiritual]
father Acarya Nagarjuna and his [spiritual] son [Aryadeva], about Candralclrti, as well as about
the elder and younger Vidyakokila575. And in Tibet, the great Madhyamikas Gangs pa She'u
576
,
KIm mDo sde, 'Bar Pa tshab Nyi rna grags
577
, ICe sGom zhig po and so forth were also known
as holders ofanihilistic view. Nevertheless, [if] they578 are also holders ofthe view of nihilism,
I have good friends."
Karma ba dKon gzhon also said: "You became a (22a) nihilist." Thereupon [Red mda' ba]
answered: "Am I really a nihilist? Look at my behavior!" To that, [Karma ba] said: "You are
very right." It is known that he said, "Please forgive [me]!"
[Red mda' ba] said:
"All buddhas and bodhisattvas dwelling in the ten directions:
Even if, after [you] have appeared to [my] direct perception, [you] teach
with one voice a different way to liberation from this,
my mind will remain unshakable, friends! "579
In this way he obtained a stable iITeversible insight.
232 Chapter 6
[2.9 Verse 9: Ethics ofthe Spiritual Teacher]
[9] Spiritual teacher, disciplined, pacified, totally pacified
580
,
endowed with all vows, free of the impurity of [any] fault or downfall,
your three doors remain in a natural spontaneous state.
I pay homage to you who have perfected [his] conduct.
Concerning these [words, the meaning is that] this spiritual teacher of the Great Vehicle has a
very disciplined mental continuum, because he is endowed with the higher training in moral
discipline. And since he is endowed with the higher training in wisdom, (S308) he is very paci-
fied. And since he is endowed with the higher trainining of mind 58 1, he is totally pacified.
[2.9.1 Vinaya Ethics]
[Among his vows] for individual liberation - the eight precepts of [the] fasting VOW
582
[for one
day ]583, the five precepts of the layman
584
, the ten precepts of the novice monk:'85 and the 253
precepts of the fully ordained monk
586
- are not covered by the shortcoming of having the stain
offaults [that lead to] downfall.
[2.9.1.11nstruction on the Conduct of a Srama(wfrom His Mino/Works]
[M: "Homage to my guru!]587
(1) (M 9a5) If, after having gone forth into the well-spoken Dharma-Vinaya,
one does not restrain oneself well,
the sramaJ;las
588
who transgress the buddha's word in an improper way,
are the [real] thieves in the world.
(2) Speaking crookedly, while (6Jb) others think that one is steadfast
and having unrefined speech are unproper ways ofbehavior for a sramaJ;la.
Having abandoned a deceitful mind (22b) and such behavior,
I will always rely on you, who speak straight.
(3) Speaking shamelessly, while others think that one is courageous
and having unrestrained speech are improper ways ofbehavior for a sramaJ;la.
Having abandoned the crazy behavior of speaking without shame
589
,
I will always rely on a peaceful manner.
(4) Acting in an artificial way, [so that] others think that one is disciplined
and deceitful cunning conduct are improper ways of behavior for a sramaJ;la.
Having abandoned the crooked behavior of deceiving others,
I will always rely on noble conduct.
(5) Behaving in a careless manner while others think that one' is honest
and not restraining one's senses are improper ways of behavior for a sramaJ;la.
One should abandon immoral contact
590
due to carelessness,.
I will always rely on the behavior of attentiveness
591
.
English Translation
(6) Engaging in many actions while others think that one is competent,
and wishing for diversions are improper ways of behavior for a sramaI}.a.
One should abandon.the householders' engagement in worldly affairs.
I will always rely on engaging in fewer activities.
(7) Receiving objects of enjoymenf92 while others think that one is splendid
593
and to have great clinging to pleasures are improper ways of behavior for a sramaI}.a.
(8309) One should abandon material wealth and the objects of a villager.
I will always rely upon a contented lifestyle.
(8) Going around the village considering others to be one's disciples
and collecting property and service are improper ways of behavior for a sramaI}.a.
One should abandon the traders' way of doing business, wishing for profit.
I will always rely on staying in solitude."
233
In this way [Red mda' ba] was endowed with the completely pure moral discipline of individual
liberation, i.e., giving up harming others and its basis.
[2.9.2 Bodhisattva Ethics]
Also his moral discipline of a bodhisattva, (23a) the accomplishment of all [deeds] for the benefit
of others, was completely pure, because he was not contaminated by the so-called fault of 'prais-
ing oneself and blaming others and [so on]'594 (62a) due to attachment towards material gifts and
service. Hence he said:
[2.9.2.1 Verses from an Instruction by Red mda' baJ
"(1) In the place where I am staying, fantasies of pleasures increase.
My own continuum is tied by the rope of material gifts and service and
the continuum of others is distressed through jealousy and competitive thinking.
I am not going to stay here even for a moment.
(2) I will never talk about the faults of others,
but only [speak] meaningful and in accord with the Dharma.
I will never give confusing advice
on war, robbery, stories of kings, and so on."
He was not contaminated by the so-called fault of "'not giving Dharma and wealth'595 out of
stinginess
596
towards those who are suffering and who are without a protector and [so on]."
Hence he gave up [B: a teacher's] holding back of teachings for disciples who were interested in
the Dharma and who were without a protector, because he taught the intended meaning of sutra
and tantra until one was fully satisfied. He had also given up the stinginess towards material
things and towards those disciples who were striving for material things and who were without
a protector, because he fulfilled the hopes of poor people.
234 Chapter 6
[2.9.2.2 Alms for a Leper in Mang yul sKyid grong}
[B: Moreover,] at a time, when this great (S310) being stayed in Mang yul
597
sKyid grong
598
with-
out any attendant, a father and his son came, both suffering from leprosy. They asked, "Please
give us a very good offering." At that, he went inside and gave them one ragged sack of parched
barley flour (tsam pa). Then they said, "Please also remember to give us some meat," whereupon
he gave them one handful of [B: beef] meat. Thereafter they asked: "Can you also give us Some
ointment to spread on our body, and a [lump of] butter?" Since they needed it, he also split apart
half a lump of butter (23b), which he found and gave it to them. It is weUknown that [Red mda'
ba] also gave them some clothes and iron.
[2.9.2.3 Alms for a Beggar at dGa' ba gdong}
At dGa' ba gdong599, one Khams painvited [Redmda' ba] for tea and gave him a whole [roll] of
white brocade as a dedication offering60o. Since, on the way back, a beggar requested him to
please give him [something], he ordered his attendant, a young monk, whom he had with him:
"Give him the whole roll of cloth!" (62b), and thus gave it [ away].
[2.9.2.4 Alms for Beggars on the Way to IHa sa}
Again, on the way to IHa sa, he gave one silver vajra each to two beggars. In IHa sa after many
beggars had gathered and requested [him] to please give them [something], [Red mda' ba] said,
"Call all [your] friends
601
who are staying close by!" Then, after he had gathered all the beggars
of the lHa sa community in the [B: four (directions)]602, including sham beggars, about five
hundred had come. And stacks of silk scarves and square brocade mats, mixed together, had
been heaped up, the beggars proceeded in narrow packed lines and whoever was first was given
what he grasped. Thereupon one old beggar said: "In IHa sa were many masters, who said, 'I am
good.' But there haven't been better than these two: 'Bar ba pa and this [ one]." [And further-
more people] said: 'Bar ba pa distributed something of value and a stack of silk scarves to
everybody. And this [Red mda ba] gave to everybody on top of that a stack of silk scarves or a
square brocade mat, whatever was grasped, [depending] on our merit.
[2.9.2.5 Alms at Bul rang)
When he stayed at Bul rong
603
he left half the meat of a white Ko [ko nor yak ]604 for someone.
He [also] left a whole lump of butter, where some (S311) crows could see it and so on. He did not
possess stinginess towards material things, because he was free from grasping at PQssessions as
'mine.' Whatever was offered to him such as gold, silver, silks and so on, he only had a glance
at them, but never engaged in the custom of holding them as dear or of inspecting them.
[2.9.2.6 Conversation about Red mda' ba by Tsang kha pa and Chas rje La tsa baJ
He was not contaminated by the so-called faults of 'not listening even when others confess
605
and getting angry and beating others (24a),606 When the great being [Red mda' ba] had left for
gTsang,607 and when the two, Chos rje [Lo tsa ba] and The Dharma Lord [Blo bzang grags pa]608,
went to Rwa sgreng, it seems that one day during their free time, Chos rje Lo tsa ba asked The
English Translation
235
Dharma Lord Blo bzang grags pa: "After the two of you, [spiritual] father [Red mda' ba] and
son, had done a strict retreat here for two or three months, you must have had various Dharma
discourses. Which (63a) special qualities does the Honorable rJe btsun pa have?"
[BIo bzang grags pa answered:] "Doesn't he possess the three qualities of a teacher of being
learned, venerable
609
and kind
610
, and isn't he someone who is connected to the yoga thatis in ac-
cord with the Dharma?" Moreover [Chos rje Lo tsa ba] said, "It seems that he had also other spe-
cial [qualities] besides these." He requested, "Please tell us this time, by all means."
Thereupon [Blo bzang grags pal said: "Although this is the smallest quality of the lama: After
from Sa skya there had been a deferral of his teachings, and he had to watch a revolt against
himself among his followers in Bul rong
611
, he finally said: 'Up to now I have not experienced
even the slightest disturbance through strong anger.' And while he was saying this, he shed large
tears." I [the author] heard that thereupon also Chos rje Lo tsa ba wept very loudly.
He was not contaminated by the so-called faults of 'giving up the Mahayana
612
and teaching
something that appears similar [to it] but is not the (8312) holy Dharma
613
' because he had the
unmistaken view of [B: and taught] the two Mahayana [tenets], the Madhyamaka and the
Cittamatra [tenet] together with the Vajrayana.
[2.9.3 Tantric Ethics]
His vidyadhara vow, which transforms afflictions into the path, was not touched by any fault
[that leads to] downfall either, because most probably he was not contaminated by the fourteen
main root infractions or the eight secondary [infractions against it], because, although it is
possible that individual [infractions] occurred, he confessed them and renewed his vow, without
allowing the time to pass. It is said: "There is no (24b) degeneration with regard to the intention
and action of his training in the Mahayana."
His physical conduct was not contrived, because he was free from pretense
614
. His verbal
conduct was not contrived, because he was free from hinting, flattering, taking away by putting
under pressure and so on. His mental conduct was not contrived, because he was free from
distraction, dishonesty, hypocrisy615 and so forth. Since he was satisfied with whatever hap-
pened, he was happy no matter what he did. And after the delusion of subject and object was
destroyed in its very place, he engaged in all-embracing spontaneous conduct.
[2.10 Verse 10: Retreat and Accomplishments ofMahiimudra]
[10] You renounced this [secular] life and concentrated on the essence of practice.
You meditated on the four truths, on dependent arising, the six perfections and the two
stages
[and] achieved the supreme siddhis of mahamudra6!6.
I pay homage to you who perfected [his] (63b) practice.
Concerning these [words he said,] "Another reason I will stay in solitude is not because I grew
weary of my retinue and friends, or because I was wishing for great material gifts and service,
236
Chapter 6
but rather because 1 see the suffering in cyclic existence as a fire pit that is very difficult to
bear."
[2.10.1 Verses from an Instruction by Red mda' ba: Determination to Go into Retreat]
Moreover, likewise [in an instruction by Red mda' ba] it is said:
"(1) Having understood that the excellences of worldly existence
617
are highly insignificant,
and that it is endowed with a collection of extremely many faults,
to release myself and others from the ocean of [cyclic J existence,
I, the learned one, will go to a solitary place.
(2) Like a cuckoo that subsists on raindrops6l8, listening to the thunder,
the discourse of solitude falls on my heart.
To make the content ofwhaf [I} have studied (8313) meaningful.
[I,] gZhon nu blo gros, will go to a solitary place.
(3) Like a flock of swans that see a lotus pond,
my mind is very excited [thinking] about a remote place.
To take full advantage of this [human] life with its freedoms and riches,
[I,] gZhon nu blo gros, will go to a solitary place.
(4) Like a young bee that sees a garden with hundred-petalled [lotuses]
my mind is attached to the taste of solitude.
To experience the taste of the nectar of concentration,
[I,] gZhon nu blo gros, will go to a (250) solitary place.
(5) Like the fresh air of the Malaya [mountains] during the springtime
the woods' medicinal meadows are pleasing to my mind.
Since the hordes of miira, the mental afflictions, are to be defeated,
[I,] gZhon nu blo gros, will go to a (250) solitary place."
Then, [B: at that time,] after a request that had been composed by the chief of a hundred
families
619
of Sa skya, and by the abbot ofbZang ldan [monastery] and others were submitted [to
Red mda' ba,] he said [in reply], "Up to eighteen human years 1 reflected on the doctrine and
gave teachings, [B: now,] at this stage of my old age, 1 will definitely not join a decrepit com-
munity (63b7). "620
[2.10.2 Verses on the Disadvantages of Desire]
[In his Minor Works] [B: It is said]:
"(1) The guide of the world
621
, the teacher of gods and human beings,
taught that the craving for sensual desire is the root of all decay.
The objects of desire will create suffering;
they are the caues for ~ i s e a s e s , tumors and pain.
English Translation
(2) Just like a leper scratching his itching skin,
like cooling water [ drunk by] a feverish person,
[ or] a thirsty person afflicted due to drinking salt water
one will never become satisfied by adhering to desire.
(3) Like well-prepared food containing poison,
honey stuck to the. edge of a razor blade
[ or] grass eaten by cattle that are drawing a cart,
sense pleasures have little benefit and much harm.
(4) Like a fly attached to the dung of an elephant,
roe deer listening to the melodious songs of a hunter,
[ or] a fish attached to the bait-meat on the hook,
the childish who long for sensual desire will be quickly lost."622
237
[Red mda' ba] read out these [verses]. (2Sa6) [Until then,] he had largely benefitted the doctrine
and sentient beings through the [Dharma] wheels oflearning and contemplation, and thereafter
largely benefitted the doctrine and sentient beings through the wheel ofmeditation
623
.]
[2.10.3 Retreat at Gangs bu Ie in Bul rong for Five Years]
After he had given up all the well-being of this life, he went to the solitary place (2Sb) g.Yu lung
rdo rje Ijongs
624
on the right slope of the Gangs bu Ie dkar p0625 in order to meditate. When he
had already practiced single-pointed concentration for five years, he meditated on the path of a
sriivaka (64a), which reaches the conclusion that a person is without self, [meaning that] he
meditated on the [sixteen attributes] of the four truths such as impermanence and the rest of the
sixteen moments [of the path of seeing].
He meditated on the path of a pratyekabuddha
626
, which reaches the conclusion that phenomena
[taken as] obj ects are without self, [and] on the twelve links of dependent arising forward and
backward.
He meditated on the path of a bodhisattva, which reaches the conclusion that phenomena [taken
as] subject are without self
27
, [and] on the six perfections and the purity (S314) of the three
spheres [i.e., meditating that subject, object and action are empty].
Since he meditated on the path of a vidyiidhara, transforming the afflictions into the path,
unifying the generation and perfection stages, he attained the highest siddhis of mahiimudrii
628
[itself].
It is said:
"Constantly remaining in the vajra body629 of a yogi
is a branch of complete concentration;
this is what is called 'vajrasattva'.
238 Chapter 6
[This] is also known as the fourth supreme empowerment
6JO
of the sugatas. It is also non-abiding
nirvaQ.a, because one has attained the true accomplishment ofmahamudra."
At that time [Red mda' ba] became a true object [of refuge], who fully cut off the misunder-
standing, the wrong views, the doubts and exaggerations towards all the teachings and practices
of the Land of Snow (Tibet), and like an omniscient being, he responded to all questions.
[2.11 Verse 11: Visions of Deities, J;>akinis and Dharma Protectors and Yogic Discipline]
[11] Although 'hitting the core' in your profound meditative accomplishment,
continually seeing masters, tutelary deities, t;liikinis and Dharma protectors,
you abide [solitary] in yogic discipline like a pratyekabuddha.
I pay homage to you who are marvelous.
Concerning these [words], although due to the aforementioned profound meditative accomplish-
ments, [Red mda' bal had unconceivable pure visions, uninterruptedly day and night, he
maintained the yogic discipline of not speaking, like a solitary buddhi'! (pratyekabuddha).
[2.11.1 Signs of Meditative Accomplishment]
Some [asked] (26a), "What special signs appear in the Honorable's personal deity practice?"
He said, "When spending one's life on Dharma, it is possible that there will be some signs, but
[I] will not tell [you]. If [ordinary people] keep even [B: some] small worldly activities (64b) se-
cret, [how much more so] when speaking about the signs one is achieving, they will become
corrupted and also the ejiikinis will be displeased." If thereafter [I had] asked [him] (8315)
purposefully, he probably would not have told. But when his guard was down, he suddenly
spoke [of it], and when asking him in a remote area again and again with great insistence, he
made a few statements [also], which I myself [mNga' ris pa Sangs rgyas rtse mo, the author of
this text,] have heard as follows:
[2.11.2 Doubt on His Lack of a Madhyamaka Lineage, Vision of Candrakirti, and
Encounter with a Skeptic]
In Bu Ie, Bla rna rGyal bzang pa [quoting] from a statement by mKhan chen g.Yag pa
6J1
said:
"With regard to Madhyamaka, [B: the great] Acarya gZhon blo bahas no lineage master, either.
[Therefore,] although I do not have an acarya either, it is appropriate to teach."
And when those who said, "He is a reincarnation of Candraklrti," [and] those who said, "He
heard teachings directly from Candraklrti," asked [Red mda' ba], "How is it really?"
[Red mda' ba] said: "As far as the Madhyamaka lineage of the words is concerned, I have [it],
but as regards the lineage of meaning, it is difficult to [say that I] have it. I am certainly not the
reincarnation ofCandraklrti. Whether I have heard [that] Dharma [directly from Candraklrti] or
not, it is known that master and disciple
6J2
have attained self-reliant knowledge and achieved
complete faith. Ifwe had not [attained them], then [we] would have become the cause of wrong
views."
English Translation
239
I [the author] requested [Red mda' ba]: "Whatever conduct the Honorable shows with body,
speech and mind, I see them only as good qualities and do not conceive them as faulty.
Therefore please tell me everything." At that, for a moment, he did not say anything. [Then] in
a state of absentmindedness [Red mda' ba] said, "After Sri Candraklrti had attained the state of
a vidyadhara, he remained in India. He is (26b) there even today, but for the fortunate disciples
who follow him, in order to be directly in front of him, there is nO need to chase after [him]."
Furthermore, Master IHa pa appointed someone [and] sent him to Phyag rdor Grub thob to ask
him to please convey the question to the Guhyapati, whether among the two, Acarya gZhon blo
and Byang pa 'Jam dbyangs
633
, one had acted as a predominating condition
634
for wrong views
and the other spread and made flourish wrong views, and where (65a) these [two in consequence]
would be reborn. Phyag rdor Grub thob asked the Guhyapati (S316), and in reply to it said:
"Acarya gZhon blo ba is an extraordinary Mahayana person, and also his view has been taught
to him in a dream by CandrakIrti. And this 'Jam dbyangs pa was [in a former life] a direct
disciple of Sa skya PaI}.9ita, endowed with firm trust [in him]. And [the fact that] at present [the
latter] is endowed with wealth also is the karmic result
35
of having requested Sa pal}. for a feast
gathering"636. In response to this answer that was carried back, [Master] lHa pa said: "That's
right! IfPhyag rdor were to have [ even just] one accomplishment, there is no doubt that I would
have heard about it."637
This account was reported to the great being [Red mda' ba] when he was in Klong rtse
638
. There-
upon he said, "He was hoping to receive the answer that I would be reborn in hell, but that is not
actually going to happen."
[B: When Master lHa pa again and again belittled the Honorable, one of [the former's] oWn
elderly female practitioners
639
said, "That is how much he is criticizing Acarya gZhon blo pa."
She told [Master lHa pal: "He was giving a Dharma teaching on the grassy plain of a snowy
slope, and it seems that an inconceivable [number of people] listened to the teachings, and even
the mountains were listening while bowing in his direction."
It is said that at that [Master lHa pa finally] recognized [Red mda' ba's realization, and] said:
"That is true! [One can understand from] the impressive manner in which he spent all his life On
practice. "]
[2.11.3 Vision of Tara in Bul rong]
Again (27a), when staying at Bul rong
640
, in the process of making circumbulations, [Red mda'
ba] said: " A Tara resides on the rock over there. " [Somebody] asked: "Where is she?" In reply
to this he pointed with his finger and said: "Over there!" [The person] replied: "She is not there."
Thereupon [Red mda' ba] said: "That is right!"
[2.11.4 Vision ofJ)akinis by the' Niece ofthe Mahasiddha dPal mol
At dMu rdzing
641
, when [he was] giving teachings on the Guhyasamajatantra, the niece of the
[female] Mahasiddha dPal mo, a lesser siddha, was listening [to the teachings] too. It happened
240 Chapter 6
that she was laughing again and again several times from the beginning of the session until it
ended. When she was asked afterwards why she was laughing, she said, "I was laughing at the
inconceivable [number of] various kinds of rjiikinis with their many colors, ornaments, clotnes,
and different ways of conduct, who came to listen to the teachings."
[2.11.5 Vision ofJ)akinis, who praise Red mda' ba during a gTor rna Offering by Tsong
kha pal
When the teacher Dha=a Lord Blo bzang pa and [his] students were staying at the snow
[mountain] '0 de (65b) gung rgyal, one evening during the gTor rna offering of the concluding
session
642
, [someone] in the gathering, rTogs ldan 'Jam dpal rgya mtsho (1356-1428)643 (S317),
saw many assemblies of rjiilanis gathering in the sky, and reciting the following praise:
"[We] bow to you, the supreme guide of [all] sentient beings
[who reside] at the right slope of the Gangs bu Ie dkar p0644,
[you] the master in the yoga
645
, Red mda' ba,
who have realized the middle way, which is free from extremes,
[B: whose objectless compassion is uninterrupted,]
who are the [embodiment of the] ultimate tantra section, Sri Guhyasamiija,
[and of] the unique system ofNagarjuna, [and]
[B: who are endowed with the wisdom that sees things as they are."
[2.11.6 Appearance ofthe Four-faced Mahiikala at Bul rongl
When staying at Bul rong
646
, a small little black person with four faces came to take the ritual
cake (gtor mal
47
When asked, "From where did you come?" He said: "I came from Mt. Kailasa
(ti se)." It became known (27b) that this was the Four-faced [MalIiikala]648.
[Red mda' ba]said to his attendant mChog legs, "Since that small protector came yesterday
evening, the gTor rna decreased
649
." He said, "From today onwards the gTor rna should not be-
come polluted." [Moreover] he said, "Yesterday evening, that Putra
650
came. He left the remains
of his meal as leftovers and thus did not allow [us] to make ourselves comfortable."
[2.11.7 Red mda' ba and the Female Lokesvara Seen by the Lesser Female Siddhiil
In dMu rdzing, when making tantric offerings, the lesser [female] siddha saw that a female
Lokesvara [had come] from the throat of the great being [Red mda' ba], secretly filled a skull
with the five kinds of meat and five kinds of nectar, and even [asked] the Honorable to please
take from it. [The lesser siddha] said, "He himself is taking from it!"
In Bul rong
651
, at the time ofa feast gathering, the Honorable said to three of us who were there,
Bla rna sGrub pa dpal, Acarya Sangs rgyas dpal and myself [the author ofthis biography]652, "I
thought tllat at present
653
I did not have the real doctrine in my mind, but [although I thought
that,] this lesser [female] siddha was saying that she saw that from the beginning of [the recita-
tion of] this
654
tantra until it was completed, the female LokeSvara was circumbulating until the
hooves of her horse were worn out. So the doctrine is still not bad."
English Translation 241
[2.11.8 Vision of Three White Women when Composing a Lineage Prayer]
At Bul rong
655
, when composing the Prayer to the [Lineage afthe Lamas who gave him] the
Instruction on the View [of the Mid41e Way l56 (8318), at night three white women came and said,
"Please make an envelope like this for this prayer!" And then they put [the prayer] into the
envelop and took it.
[2.11.9 Interaction with a Spirit while Teaching the Lesser Female Siddhii]
Again at Bul rong
6S7
, when he was conferring the [instructions on] the meditative imaginations
658
related to the five stages on the lesser [female] siddhii, [conferring] one meditative imagination
[instruction] every thirteen days, after performing cine imagination for two days, a young man
came wearing white clothes. He brought water, made a fire, cooked vegetables and served [her]
whatever was required, without talking to her. Initially, the lesser [female] siddhii did not say
(28,) anything either. When she went to report on [her progress in] meditative imagination, she
told [Red mda' ba] that after two days the above-mentioned young man had come and asked
[him], "What is this?"
[Red mda' ba] said: "I do not know what this is. You [just] work diligently on your spiritual
practice! I will keep up my meditative imagination, too." When she went back, the man was still
there and was serving her whatever was required, as before.
When about ten days had passed, [the young man] said: "I would like to go, but your teacher has
filled the valley with fire, and thus there is no way out. Please convey to your teacher that I say
that he should loosen his meditation." She did not reply to that.
When she went again to report on [her progress in] meditative imagination, [Red mda' ba] said:
"Is your man still there now?" She reported how [the young man] had spoken to her, whereupon
[Red mda' ba] said, "I have not done that much meditation. Now he will leave. " The Honorable
lifted the protection circle
659
and when she had returned, he was no longer there. [Red mda' ba]
said: "A spirit
660
came as an obstacle to [ our] virtuous [practice]."
Also when [Redmda' ba] was residing at Brag dkarrta S0661, a visible form ofdPe dkar
662
came
that covered the inside of the hermitage
663
and was looking at the Honorable with angry eyes.
But since [Red mda' ba] remained (66b) in meditation, [dPe dkar] disappeared (8319) on his own.
[2.11.10 Meeting with mNga' ris pa mNga' bdag after his Decease]
Again, when residing in Bul rong
66
4, .Acarya Nam mkha' dpal had sent a plea in which he re-
ported that [word is] spreading that mNga' ris pa mNga' bdag
665
has probably passed away and
therefore he requested [Red mda' ba] to please remember him in his meditation. That night, [Red
mda' ba] performed a siidhana ceremony of Guhyasamiija while concentrating on [the
deceased]. Day broke and the great lord mNga' bdag came in front of [Red mda' ba] in his
typical clothing, accompanied by an escort. Thereupon the Honorable said in a state of
absentmindedness (28b), "Is it really true that you have passed away?" It is said that he nodded
his head three times and thereafter dissolved into his throne.
242 Chapter 6
[2.11.11 Meeting with The Dharma Lord Jiia ba upon his Decease]
Again, when The Dharma Lord Jila na passed away, [Red mda' ba said:] "Lama Jila na,ba
appeared here yesterday evening. It seems he has passed away." When [later] comparing the
time, it fit with that evening.
[2.11.12 Recovery from illness by Recitation of Verses from the Mlllamadhyama-
kakiirikiij
When he suffered from a serious illness, there was intense pain even when he was sitting in
meditation. Hence his body was trembling more and more, and sweat flowed like water.
At that time, by reciting the following verses'66 three times, he received relief from the illness:
"I prostrate to the perfect Buddha,
The.best of all teachers, who taught that
That which is dependent origination is
Without cessation, without arising;
Without annihilation, without permanence;
Without coming; without going;
Without destruction; without identity;
And peaceful- free from fabrication."
[2.11.13 Bla rna sGrub pa dpal's Gaining of Trust]
When Lama sGrub pa dpal was offering [his] services [to Red mda' ba], he had gone to rTug pa
thu, and thus it became late. Since he had not arrived, [Red mda' ba] thought: "Time for meal
(gdant67 is over." He was there cooking the food by himself, but even when Bla rna [sGrub pa
dpal] had arrived, he was unable to go inside, but looked through a slit in the door.
Thus [he saw that while Red mda' ba] was stirring the food (S320), [some] dropped in front of
him [on his clothes, and] he said, "All phenomena exist merely by (67a) name, merely by label,
as mere designation
668
, merely as an imputation," and then started eating directly from the
cooking pot. Due to this [Bla rna sGrub pa dpal] gained great trust [in him].
[2.11.14 Red mda' ba's Ceaseless Weeping at Sa skya]
[Once Red mda' ba] arrived at Sa skya before the conch-shell [was blown to call monks] for the
community tea. He sat near the cooking hearth, staring at the well water, with tears dropping one
by one. Even when preparing [butter] (29a) tea, he did not stop [crying]. Also when returning
home, on the way, he did not stop [crying].
Then sPre bo Thar bzang said to [one of Red mda' ba's disciples], "Your teacher is crying both
when eating, as well as when going. What is this?" Thereupon the disciple thought, "To me it
seems that he started crying after he had seen that a fish had been eaten by an otter," and thus
asked [Red mda' ba]: "Is it [because of] that?"
English Translation
243
[Red mda' ba replied:] "That is not the actual [reason]. While the well water was splashing, I
was meditating on dependent arising by analyzing one of the twelve links and due to this a true
view of emptiness arose [in my mind]. And since emptiness is endowed with the essence of
compassion
669
, I started crying."67o.
[2.11.15 During Term Break: Lapsing into Mental Absorption and Various Signs of
Miraculous Power]
When the Honorable went to Shangs during term break (chos bar l71 , he had a horse and there-
fore left later. The [other] monks had departed earlier, and had already crossed the ford. The
Honorable let his horse go wherever it liked, and [eventually,] when [the horse] got into a deep
whirlpool, although the monks were yelling [as at] a horse race, he drove the horse straight into
it. Hence the horse sank into the water, and although the water was almost touching its mouth
and he was driving it, it was not lost. They asked him what his technique was, and thereupon
[Red mda' ba] said: "Because a horse is one who can put its [B: four] feet on something, it will
not fall over."
Moreover, when proceeding during term break through a wide open plain, [his mind] wandered
into meditation, and afterwards [when coming out of meditation] he [just] went wherever his
face was directed. It is said that (S321) several times they needed to go to bring him back.
Also when he was going from mNga' ris to the gTsang po [river], accompanied by The Dharma
Lord [Blo bzang] grags pa as a traveling companion, (67b) he became absorbed in meditation, and
after that he was frequently thrown off the horse and many times needed help to get up. Then the
groom said, "Due to this unnecessary meditation of A.carya gZhon blo ba I have to bear a lot of
hardship."
(29b) When [Red mda' ba] was sleeping in the assembly hall of Shel dkar
672
, he was taking his
meals (gdan) on top of the community hall (spyi khang). One day, when I [the author,] had
requested a ceremony at a specific Buddhist festival, we were about six or seven people in this
cramped room, but none of us had seen the Honorable go up. We became very astonished [and
said], "The Honorable must have magical power, because he went past us in this narrow hall, but
we did not see him."
[2.11.16 Meeting with Tsong kha pa and his Disciples on the Way to rna sa]
When the Honorable was travelling to dBus, he was received by The Dharma Lord [Blo bzang
grags pa] along with about 300 disciples standing in a beautifulline
673
. When upon The Dharma
Lord's prostrations [Red mda' ba] wished to make prostrations in return, [Tsong kha pal
requested him please not to.
674
From that time onwards, since [Red mda' ba] was no l o n g ~ r
making prostrations in return [to Tsong kha pal, although the [other] great scholars from dBus
were deprived of the pleasure of doing return prostrations [to Tsong kha pa] too, the Honorable
[continued] to prostrate to the abbot of gSang sde, to sTag lung 10 tsa ba and so forth, and
therefore became also known as the fine master (Jo bo bzang pa).
244 Chapter 6
[2.11.17 dEu rna Teachings in dGa' ba gdong to 500 Scholars Headed by Tsong kha pal
After that, at dGa' ba gdong, [Red mda' ba] taught the Madhyamakavatara and the Instruct jon
on the View [of the Middle Way J to about 500 scholars well-versed in Abhisamaya and Pramfu;la,
headed by The Dharma Lord Blo bzang grags pam, bKa' bcu pa Nam mkha' byang chad, bSod
shes dar rna and some 'Masters of the Eight Scriptures' (bKa' brgyad pa). Hence there was a rain
of flowers and all (S322) became devoted to him.
[2.11.18 Debates with Scholars from gSang phu Ne'u thog]
At that time gSang phu ba
676
lDan rna dKon seng
677
stood up and asked, "Please listen, I have a
request of both of you, father Dharma Lord [Red mda' ba] and your [spiritual] son [Tsong kha
pa]. [People] say that Red mda' ba is the [leading] scholar in gTsang, and Blo bzang is the
[leading] scholar in dBus. You two, father and son are [B: nowadays] getting a reputation as
being the holders (68a) of the Buddha's doctrine in dBus and gTsang. Hence, now, on the
occasion of this gathering, please show us, without keeping anything back(3oa), [your] system of
explanation on the three vehicles and the four tenets, in order to eliminate the wrong views and
doubts of us interested people from dEus and gTsang. Let us have a dialogue in this assembly.
And after we have made investigations through quotation and reasoning and have come to a a
final decision as to what [needs to be] established and refuted [as right and wrong], please tum
that Wheel ofDharma
678
for along time." Then he asked both the greatrJe btsun [Red mda' ba]
not to go to Gangs bu Ie and Dharma Lord Blo bzang [B: grags] pa not to go to the snowy
mountains of'O de gung rgyal
679
, but to please perform the vast deed of teaching the [Buddhist]
scriptures in dEus and gTsang.
At that time The Honorable distributed tea along with a silk scarf and some money offerings680
to all the sangha [members].
Then, when going to sNe'u, during ahot tea break (tsha/
81
in the rows [ofmonks]682 one scholar
from gSang phu [monastery] stood up from among the row of roughly 70 good scholars,683
headed by the spiritual father [rJe btsun Red mda' ba] and his spiritual son [rJe Tsong kha pa],
and said: "I would like to ask each of you, father and son, [to say] some words. Therefore please,
spealc frankly without hiding anything. Is it true that [you] venerable Master Red mda'ba [said]
during a talk: 'In general [to understand] the intended meaning ofthe words of the Buddha and
the [Indian] treatises [translated into Tibetan] one needs to have some understanding of the main
points of the scriptures of the traditional system [in its whole, that is, one needs to have read
them] from the beginning [to] the end. Having read a few lines, [thinking] 'Oh yes, I know this,'
one will not have certainty.' Is it really true [that you said this]?" [Red mda' ba] replied: "I
cannot remember that I really said it like this (S323), but generally speaking, this is how it is." In
terms of content the honorable master accepted [that he had said] it. It is said that he had kept in
mind to speak without hiding anything.
Is it really tme (30b) that the precious master [Tsong kha pa] said, "If you want to penetrate the
difficult points of the scriptures ofthe traditional system, you need my master
684
. If you want to
distinguish difficult wordings, you need A bo rgan chen
685
."
English Translation
245
The [two] Dharma Lords [just] smiled (68b) and did not say anything. Thereupon [the scholar
from gSang phu monastery] said: "Even these two, spiritual father and son, who are good and
bad lords, tum [things] upside down like the staircase of a stUpa
686
."
[2.11.19 Foot Blessing]
Again, [during] a hot tea break (tsha) in the rows [of monks] of sNe'u', a [scholar] called
"Acarya sNyal pa," a monk from the upper portion of gSang phu [monastery], which has around
a hundred monks, asked [Red mda' ba] to please give him a 'foot blessing
687
.,
Thereupon [Red mda' ba] replied: ''How is it possible for a great scholar like you?" [and] did not
give it. Then [Aciirya sNyal pal insisted, [saying,] "I also wish [to be able] to say at the end of
my life that I have been touched by the flawless lotus feet of dPalldan Red mda' ba. Then even
when an old monk, I do not need to be afraid [of dying]. Put your feet!"
[Red mda' ba] replied, "Well then, take it!"688 and gave [him] the foot blessing.
[2.11.20 sMon lam chen mo in Front ofthe Jo bo Sakyamuni]
Then he went to ilia sa and taught about 800 monastics and 600 lay people how to turn happi-
ness and misery into the path [of practice ]689. At that time The Dharma Lord BIo bzang grags pa
had arranged huge offerings in front of the Jo bo [Siikyamuni in the main cathedral]690 and
requested the Bla rna [gZhon nu blo gros] to sit in front of the Jo bo and [B: to add his support]
to make aspirational prayers. Headed by himself, along with about 500 monastics they offered
an extensive seven-limbed prayer. Above all, they extensively offered the Arya Samantabha-
dra's Conduct Prayer and the the Sukhiivati Prayer
691
, composed (8324) by himself, [B: as well
as other prayers]. In particular, they prayed three times, led by the venerable all-knowing Kuma-
ramati, [in other words, Red mda' ba]:
"Mayall the friends
692
of the doctrine, the [B: noble] persons who are [still] alive,
attain long lives
693
for the benefit of the doctrine and sentient beings."
[2.11.21 Another Foot Blessing]
It is said that at that time it also happened that the Honorable, when being asked for a 'foot
blessing,' gave it upon request. Since The Dharma Lord [Blo bzang grags] pa did not give it at
all (31.), the monks of gSang phu [monastery] said: "Red mda' ba, when being requested for
'foot blessing' gives it without any fear of death upon request. [But] Blo bzang [grags] pa, since
he is afraid of death, does not give it to anyone."
[2.11.22 Receiving Offerings in Rwa sgreng, sTag rtse etc.]
Then, when he went to (69.) Rwa sgreng
694
, Brag dkar mo pa, Bya yul Rin po che, Lo mKhan po,
and the [people] from the 'Bri khung sTag rtse rdzong made marvellous offerings [to Red mda'
bal. Thereafter, when he went to the upper valley of sTag rtse, about 300 sangha members had
lost their [provision with] meals (gdan chad). Thereafter they all went on almsround and just by
chance received meals.
246 Chapter 6
[2.11.23 Red mda' ba's and Tsong kha pa's Mastery over the Sky Treasure]
Then a group ofLo pa
695
came and asked to establish a spiritual connection [with Redmda' ,ba].
Since they had offered more than 20 mdz0
696
loads of barely flour, it became a problem to
transport them. It became known that [people] were saying that it seems that the [two] Dharma
Lords, father [Red mda' ba] and son [Tsong kha pal, had gained mastery over the (miraculous
inexhaustible) Sky Treasure
697
.
[2.11.24 Teachings during the Rainy Season Retreat with Tsong kha pal
Next they went to Rwa sgreng [monastery]. They made prostrations and extensive offerings to
the marvelous three objects [of refuge], the foremost of which was [an offering of an image of]
Guhyasamajamaiijuvajra
698
with a bigger and smaller silver umbrella. From the entrance to the
cave above the monastery, where spiritual father [Red mda' ba] and son [Tsong kha pal had
decided to do a retreat, they turned the following Wheels of Dharma for a group of about 600
locals and visitors in accordance with their fortune. The great being [Red mda' ba] [B: gave the
following teachings: an instruction on the blessing through practice], 699 the Five (S325) Stages
(Paneakrama) of the Guhyasamiija[tantraJ, an instruction on the profound view [ofthe middle
way fOG, [B: a method for meditating on the two forms of selflessness
70I
, an instruction on the
vast conduct (ofbodhisattvas W
02
, Mahayana Mental Purification [B: and] explanations on The
Four Hundred Verses (bZhi brgya palo
3
, After the retreat was over, he gave an extensive
explanation of[Nagarjuna's] Sixty Stanzas of Reasoning Rigs pa drug beu palo
4
,
And when [the teaching] was over, he said: "When I explain the intended meaning of the
spiritual father Nagarjuna and his [spiritual] son [Aryadeva] (3Ib), I explain it like this. But even
for the Omniscient One it would be extremely difficult to explain the system of traditional
scriptures in conformity with the individual ideas of each and every human being."
[2.11.25 Teachings to Teachers from gSang phu, Gung thang, rTse thang etc.]
When The Dharma Lord had gone far offto 'Bri khung
705
, he gave [teachings] to about seventy
excellent scholars, led by two Masters of the Ten Scriptures, from the three [monasteries of]
gSang [Phu], bDe [ba can] and [Tshal] Gung [thangf06, as well as other monasteries such as rTse
thang707, [on] a Commentary on the Sri Guhyasamiijatantra (SriguhyasamiijatantravivarmJa) to-
gether with its sub-commentaries and an extended explanation Ornaments of
the Middle Way (dEu ma rgyan, MadhyamakiilaI[1kiira). Thereupon even [persons] with less
faith like lDan rna dKon seng
708
and Nam mkha' gshog ral and so on attained complete faith,
[2.11.26 Healing of an Insane Woman while Staying with Tsong kha pa in sTag lung]
Then, when both father [Redmda' ba] and son [Tsongkha pal met a noblewoman (10 mo) of the
'01 ka sTag rtse
709
[family] in the lower valley of sTag lung710. She came to request a spiritual
connection and [turned out to] have become insane due to Dharma
711
The Honorable called a
(69b) monk, [saying,] "Come quickly. Put the right hand of the noblewoman below and beat [her]
with your right hand from above." After this was done, the noblewoman was cured from her
mental disorder.
English Translation
247
Most people who were around thought, "He is not only well-versed in the Three Collections of
Sacred Writings (Tripitaka), but also knows how to remove obstacles." Thus all were amazed.
Thereafter [they] were invited to sTag lung, and sTag lung Rin po che made extensive offerings
to them, such as clothes, horses, tea-pots 712 and so on. The gathering received teachings
and all the sTag lung pa became very respectful [of him.]
[2.11.27 Teachings by Chos rje Lo tsii ba, Red mda' ba and Tsong kha pa]
Then (8326) in the great study centre
713
of gNam rtse Ideng
714
about 500 sangha members headed
by Chos rje La tsii ba sKyabs mchog dpal bzang po and both Dharma Lords, spiritual father
[Red mda' ba] and son [Tsong kha pa] had undertaken the ritual c9mmitment to perform the
rainy season retreat (dbyar gnas, [On top of these, 300] others gathered from all
directions (32a) to make spiritual connections. [So altogether] there were about 800 [devotees] for
whom [they] turned the Wheel of Dharma. During the main session
715
, the great being [Red mda'
ba] taught Vinaya, the Root Verses, the Entrance to the MiddZe Way, the Guhyasamiijatantra and
the Instruction on the View. Furthermore he gave those who came from [various] directions
whatever spiritual connection they wished for. At that time The Dharma Lord BIo bzang grags
pa offered a ma/pjaZa three times with one golden coin each, after he had made a promise that he
would forward the best items of whatever rations he received during the rainy season retreat.
Besides that, whenever he got something, he invited [Red mda' ba] and himself offered whatever
had been offered to him, making prayers, asking for dedications, and so on. Before this he had
also made an extensive offering of [various precious items] such as gold, silver, brocade and
silk, the foremost of which was a two-faced MaiijusrI bronze statue cast by a goldsmith. Later on
several times he also offered a large [measure] of silver and a complete set of robes, [B: and]
offered tea continuously. So Tsang kha pa relied on Red rna' ba just like rTag tu Ngu (70a) on
'Phags pa Chos pa
716

[2.11.28 Departure for gTsang and Sa skya and Offerings to a Sangha Gathering of
1,800]
After the rainy season retreat [Red mda' ba] left for gTsang and went to Sa skya. To the
MaiijusrI [image] he [B: offered] a fine Tahun
717
upper robe (snam sbyar, sa/1ghii{i)718, [B: and]
one baldachin (bZa re). To the assembly of about 1,800 [monks] he offered a co=unity tea
along with some money.
[2.11.29 Three-Year Retreat in Bul rong]
Thereafter, when [Red mda' ba] was staying in Bul rang for a strict three-year retreat,719 Bu leno
came continuously to take the gTor rna. One day (8327) the lesser female mahiisiddhii saw him,
but [only] laughed and asked, "Who is there?" Bu Ie answered: "Please inform [Red mda' ba]
that Bu Ie is coming to take the gTor rna."
248 Chapter 6
[2.11.30 Prediction by a Local Female Spirit in dMu rdzing)
First, while spending his term break in dMu rdzing, at (32b) daybreak the local female spirit,
Khyung lung rna, appeared in front of [Red mda' bal. Thereupon, wearing inconceivable
ornaments and clothing she prostrated [to him]. After she had asked for his blessing, she
dissolved into the earth.
During the morning, while having a hot tea break, [Red mda' ba] saw an image of the local
female spirit drawn on the surface of the wall. He then said: "She does not [look] like this. She
is a hundred times more beautiful than this."
At that time the local female spirit entered into a woman, whereupon [that woman] said:
"Former b h i k ~ u s are about to come here. Hence [you must] offer them perfect service!" The
former b h i k ~ u [she referred to] was Byang sems Zla ba rgyal mtshan 721. c
[2.11.31 Teachings on Abhidharma)
At that time, Red mda' ba gave instructions to five [disciples], including mKhan chen dPal 'byor
and A.carya Dar rna [ rin chen], by pointing out [the respective points in Vasubandhu' s] auto com-
mentary on his [AbhidharmaJkosa. Due to that, each of the five gained a rather good
722
under-
standing [of the text]. [Red mda' ba] was very delighted, and said, "To teach like this is very
pleasant."
While [Red mda' ba] was spending his term-break on Ngam rings723 peak [mountain] with six-
teen masters and students, including BIo bzang [grags pal, mKhan chen bsTan rgyal and 700
masters and students [were spending their time] in N gam rings valley teaching and listening [to
teachings]. Hence [the question] came to the Honorable's mind, "Who is benefitting the doctrine
more, he and those 700 teachers and students, or I myself with these sixteen masters (7Gb) and
students?" Later [he] said: "Among those 700, not one is as capable as a single BIo bzang grags
pa."
[2.11.32 Comparison with Bn ston's Disciple mKhan chen Dharma sri)
Initially, when [Red mda' ba] saw Bu ston Rin po che's main [spiritual] son mKhan chen
Dharma SU724 and about fifty masters and students perfectly studying the Four (S328) Great
[Scriptures], [the question] came to his mind: "Will I be able to benefit the [Buddha's] doctrine
and sentient beings that much?" But later he said: "Actually I have been of greater benefitfor the
doctrine and the sentient beings (33,) than he has."
[2.11.33 Question by the King ofmNga' ris Khri rgyal bSod nams Ide]
K.hri rgyal bSod nams Ide 725 asked [Red mda' ba], "Arya Asanga was a great person predicted by
the Buddha himself. But Venerable Maitreya did not teach [him] Madhyamaka. Why is this?"
Thereupon [Red mda' ba] replied, "Well, mothers do not give their newborn children a lump of
kneaded [dough made from barely flour] right from the beginning. Why do they give them pap
in the interim?" Then Khri rgyal bSod nams Ide lost his courage to ask [anything further].
English Translation
249
[2.11.34 Further Comment on the Kalacakratantra]
Again, since there were many who said that the nirmii(wkiiya and the sambhogakiiya are not
Buddha, [Red mda' ba] was asked, "How is it?" Thereupon he said: "Today's scholars do not
have the slightest certainty. When I asked whether there were contradictions in the commentary
to the Kiilacakratantra, they said, 'This is the action of discarding religion.'726 [But] it is
appropriate that there are people who say that the nirmiilJakiiya and sambhogakiiya are not
Buddha. They say, 'There is such a tradition.' They do not think about where [this will lead to],
because [this leads to] big faults such as that if the nirmiilJakiiya and sambhogakiiya are not
Buddha, all slUras and tantras will no longer be the words of the Buddha."727
[2.11.35 Praises ofRis Outstanding Qualities]
The senior monk
728
dNgos grub said: "The conduct of our
729
master is inconceivable. Associated
with a foolish one, he is barely the better one. Also when associated with somebody, who knows
Piiramita and PramaI).a, he is slightly better. Even when associated with somebody, who knows
the four main scriptures, he is just a little better. And also when associated with a great scholar,
(71.) he does very much better than the other. I myself obtained specially esteem [of him] (S329)
for that itself."
bKa' bcu pa Yon tan said: "[People] were saying, 'I have never seen a teacher who has more
faith and respect in the three jewels than this one. Every time [Red mda' bal went to [B: sKyid]
grong to meet the Jo bo (33b), he was holding his hand and while reciting the sloka [that starts
with the line] 'Protector Avalokitesvara, [may I attain] a body like you ... etc.'730, tears were
rolling down from his eyes continuously.' I thought, 'Is this really true?' Later, after
intentionally making an investigation into it, I also observed this myself. It is true."
Acarya rGyal dbang from gSang phu [monastery] said: "Among the teachers with whom I was
close, I have seen none except Red mda' ba who naturally brings suffering to an end."731 'Jam
dbyangs pa [of La stod Byang] said: "I heard some [people] say that at present in Tibet there is
no scholar more learned than Slob dpon [gZhon blo ba], but in my view, since the authentic doc-
trine no [longer] exists in east and west India, China or Nepal, at present there is no scholar more
learned among the scholars than Slob dpon [gZhon blo ba] in this world." When the Honorable
at that time left for another district (khri skor )732, although he did not say [anything], he was very
worried. As soon as it was heard that [Red mda' ba] would come to Byang
733
, this was [treated
as] very good news. [People] said: "Although I have objects of each of the three [jewels]
endowed with blessings, it is not the same. Just the arrival of a great scholar who knows the
scriptures is auspicious for [all] the directions." [Red mda' ba] was very pleased [to hear that].
mKhan chen bSod nams skyabs pa said: "Others cannot match [B: even] my teacher's smallest
good quality. [These other] teachers, although staying in a mountain cave, meditate without any
regret about robes made of brocade and silk. Meanwhile, those from other schools, even though
they [wrongly] meditate on a self, wear worn-out things inside [the cave] and when they go out-
side they act with care (71b) (34.) (S330)." [mNga' ris pa Sangs rgyas rtse mo:] "This is very true."
250 Chapter 6
During [Redmda' ba's] stay in dMu rdzing, bKa' bcu pa Don seng went to meet him to receive
Dharma [teachings]. When [the teachings] were over, and he was making preparations to leave,
[Red mda' ba] said, "If you are leaving today, go along the way where the rTa zur-bridge
734
begins." [bKa' bcu pa Don seng] replied, "We are not going in that direction." Thereupon [Red
mda' ba replied:] "Oh! I thought, I was in Bul rang." [When later] I [the author] went to the
Honorable and asked him whether he had really said this to the Master of the Ten Scriptures, [he
answered,] "[Yes] I did [say] it. The valley of Bul rang up there seems to me like my
homeland.
735
Some [karmic] imprints must have ripened." [Furthermore] he said: "It was only
due to the kindness of the great Arya Chos bzang dpal that I found this pleasant hermitage up
here."
[2.11.36 Authoring of an Index]
When [Red mda' ba] had gone to meet the great Arya Chos bzang dpal, [the latter] said [to him]:
"You are the holder of the precious doctrine. Therefore you must assume the associated
responsibility. The precious Buddha's doctrine is in your hands. The precious doctrine you know
[best]."
Thereafter [Chos bzang dpal] held him by the hand and gave him much advice. At the end he
said, "[While you are] here, you should also draw up an index of the writings you have
completed on the doctrine so far." Thereupon [Red mda' ba] composed a catalog (dkar chag)
[listing all] of the afore-mentioned writings (gsung sgrosj136 [that he had fInished] up to his 27th
year oflife, [stating] in which year he composed which [text].737 .
[2.11.37 Offerings to the Jo bo in sKyid grong]
When the Honorable was staying at Grad chung, he sent [someone] to offer bangles for the arms
and the feet of the Jo bo [statue] in sKyid rong, after he had them forged to an estimated size.
The size turned out to be just right. Someone asked him, "Did [you] Honorable measure (34b) it
yourself?" Thereupon he replied: "No, I didn't. The suitable size is due to the blessing of Jo bo
(na) (S331) himself."
When I [the author] went to meetmKhan chen g.Yag pa, I asked him: "Which of the three, Chos
rje Lo tsa ba, rJe btsun pa [gZhon nu blo gras] and Blo bzang grags pa, is supreme?" [mKhan
chen g.Yag pa] said: "Nowadays it is diffIcult to entrust oneself to spiritual teachers like Acarya
gZhon blo ba. I read his commentary on Paramita, and there are some internal contradictions. He
says that the works of Maitreya
738
are Cittamatra, but I hold them to be the Buddha's words,
because Maitreya is a Buddha. Since [Red mda' ba] is a great [practitioner of] Guhyasamaja-
[tantra], he will take MaiijusrI [as the principal deity] in the mm;rjala7J9. Tell [your] teacher that
I say, "IfMaiijusrI and Maitreya are Buddha, they should be identical. If they are not [Buddha]
they should not be."
Thereafter 1 reported to [Redmda' ba] what [mKhan chen g.Yag pal had asked me [to tell him].
Thereupon [Red mda' ba] said: "It is possible that there are some minor internal contradictions.
I did not hold [myself] to [be] a saint (arya), who speaks without any fault. Whether the internal
English Translation
251
contradictions which he grasped are really internal contradictions, I don't know. The [Buddha's]
doctrine which is taken as the basis here explains Maitreya to be a bodhisattva and the five
works ofMaitreya to be treatises.
74o
Even if[mKhan chen g.Yag pal were to say that he himself
is more than a Buddha, he is entitled [to say so ].74l The net ofVajrayiina is suitable to cover the
paramitayiina. But to use the analogy of the hat in the place of the shoes is not the tradition of
scholars
742
."
[Somebody] told the Honorable that mKhan chen Chos dpal said, "Don't talk about view until
you have attained the path ofseeing
743
Then you will know." Thereupon [Red mda' ba] said,
"The path of seeing is the result of a (35,) flawless view. Without understanding the view, one
will not know how to obtain the path of seeing. It is as if one would open [a shop] and say,
'Goods sold out' (8332)."744
[2.11.38 Invitation by Chos rje Lo tsii ba and Master dBang pa to sTag tshang]
[At a certain point] Chos rje Lo tsa ba
745
and Master dBang pa sent an invitation [to Red mda'
ba] (72b) and asked him: "Please come, if you are in good health and conditions are conducive."
After Lo tsa ba had finished constructing the monastery, he gathered about two thousand loads
[of grain]. Additionally he picked up loads of meat, butter, brocade, mattresses, firewood and
other items. Then he made aspirational [prayers] that [Red mda' ba] would come right away, and
sent [someone] to collect him.
At that [Red mda' ba] said, "I have grown old, my physical body has become heavy and thus I
am not able to travel." He sent a very beautiful bronze statue of his main tutelary deity Maiijusrl,
[together with] a scarf and a letter, and did not go.
It is known that the Honorable due to his clairvoyance knew that great disturbances 746 would
happen in sTag tshang
747
and after he had learned that the lifespan of both the patron and the
priest would be short, he did not go.
[2.11.39 Twelve Years in Bnl rong]
His stays in Bul rong, the earlier and later, [were altogether] twelve years.
748
[First] the Hon-
orable had stayed for five years in single-pointedness of mind
749
on his own, and [later] for seven
years he turned whichever Wheel of Dhanna was suitable. And while staying in the valley of
Bul rong, he gave detailed and comprehensive teachings such as teachings on the Guhyasamaja-
tantra, and on the three [main Madhyamaka] texts, Root Verses, Entrance to the Middle Way and
the Four Hundred Verses as well as on the Instruction on the View to mKhan chen dPal 'byor
and The Dhanna Lord mChog bzang along with about eighty monks who were exclusively
interested in Dhanna. And since the [people] who were listening [to the teachings] had also
nothing other to do than [practice] Dhanna, they spent day and night exclusively on Dhanna.
Although it was difficult to go to that place, [people] followed [Red mda' ba] from as far away
as Sa sIeya, and he received a great deal of excellent service and worship. It is said that the
offering of valuable things [for the maintenance] of the doctrine that [Red mda' ba] received
along with worship in Bul rong was three times more than needed (35b).
252 Chapter 6
[2.11.40 Next Year: Teachings to 180 Persons including the Female Mahasiddha dPal
mol
In the following year in dMu rdzing, [Red mda' ba] gave [teachings] on the Guhyasamajatantra
and on the two [Madhyamalca texts], Root Verses and Entrance to the Middle Way, along with
an Instruction on the View to about a hundred and eighty [devotees] headed by the great Acarya
Nam rnkha' dpal
750
, and including Brag (S333) ram mKhan chen
751
, Acarya leas stan, 'Dar pa
mGon seng, the [female] Mahasiddha dPal (73a) mo752, and the patron governor rTogs ldan.
[2.11.41 Request to Live Long by the Female Mahasiddha dPal mo at His 60th year]
When the Dharma [teachings] were about two thirds over, in the last part of the night a huge
non-human being came directly to the [female] Mahasiddha dPal rna and said: "At daybreak,
rush into the presence of the master [Red mda' ba] and make three prostrations [to him]. Then
request him three times: 'Honorable, please remain for the benefit of the doctrine and sentient
beings for a long time.' It seems that there are great obstacles."
When the [female] Mahasiddha heard this, she woke up and felt unhappy. At daybreak she
brought it to the Honorable's attention that she had important information for him and that she
absolutely needed to come [to see him]. He said, "Come!" She made the prostrations and the
request as she had been earlier instructed. [Then she said,] "I was just told by someone to do
this. If I am lying or deceiving, may the Dharma protectors and guardians of the Honorable
punish me. I swear."
[Then Red mda' ba] replied: "There is no point to suggest that you might be lying. When I was
engaged in teaching and studying at Sa skya, it happened that there was a loud voice that said
that I would die about this age. When at that time I investigated further, it came to my mind that
I would die at [the age of] 61. Although I will not die this year, I think next year will be my great
relocation. [B: I will die]."
[2.11.42 Further Request to Live Long by mNga' ris pa Sangs rgyas rtse mol
To the Honorable this 'pre-obstacle time' (bsu skyeg) was more harmful than the time of great
obstacles (skyeg chen).753 At that time [they] asked him which [animal]-year sign
754
he was and
let him know that [they] would have [his horoscope] drawn up. By calculating, [they] came [to
the same result] as [what] the [female] Mahasiddha (36a) [had been told]. Thereafter, when the
teaching was over, since [Red mda' ba] was leaving for Bul rong (S334), [they] asked [him] to
please do a strict retreat [I, the author, told him]: "I will also come to [bring] a good cushion
755
to sit on." Later, after being offered an excellent cushion to sit on, [Red mda' ba] said that he
saw that for some years he would have good health.
[2.11.43 Later that Year: Journey to mNga' ris, Conferring Ordination]
Later that year, [Red mda' ba] said: "Let us go in the direction ofmNga' (73b) ris, since there are
nice places and the people are flexible. 'Jam dbyangs pa chased after him up to rGya rnkhar ba,
but failed [to catch up with him]. Chen po dPalldan also chased after him a little bit and asked
English Translation
253
him not to go, but [Red mda' ba] did not listen, and left for mNga' ris. Over there he gave
sriimaJ;lera precepts to the two Ne ring(s f56 nephews. And to the governor rTogs ldan he gave the
b h i k ~ u vow. They had made excellent offerings to support him, rTag rtse ba escorted him to
Brag nag
757
Thereafter he was received by the mNga' ris pa and then went to rDzong dkae
58
.
The people from the Gung thang palace offered him excellent hospitality.
[2.11.44 Journey to Mang yul Gung thang to Make Offerings to Arya Vati]
Then he went to Mang yul and made prostrations and huge offerings in front of the self-origi-
nated Arya [Va tiV
59
After [Red mda' ba] had given the pravrajyii vow to Thang Sher pa's
nephew, he left for the forest of Me tog mdangs can
760
to meditate.
[2.11.45 Retreat in Me tog mdangs can, Gifts from China]
At that time, after a local spirit called "bTsan rje"761 who liked the Dharma had come, [Redmda'
ba] said, "He offered me a beer (chang), but due to the thought that I would not drink beer, it
turned into melted butter. I drank a portion of it and put [the remainder] aside. [The spirit] [B:
also] offered many excellent material things [to me]. Then, after four or five days, offerings from
China (36b) arrived.762 I thought, 'It seems the local spirit knew [that this offering would come].'"
[2.11.46 Invitation to Tibet by bDag chen rna]
Then, when the retreat was over (8335), [Red mda' ba] was invited to Tibee
63
by bDag chen rna
[B: Sangs rgyal mo f64. On the side of the mountain, she offered excellent summer provisions to
the masters and students for their maintenance.
[2.11.47 Production of a bsTan 'gyur]
At that time [Red mda' ba] gave profound and extensive explanations on the Five Stages ofGuh-
yasamiija, the Instruction on the View, on Mind Purification, on both [Madhyamaka texts], the
Root Verses and the Entrance to the Middle Way, [as well as explanations] on the Guhyasamaja-
tantra, mainly to the honorable [female] acarya 765 and to about 180 [disciples] such as Chen po
Chos dpaF
66
, Acarya Yi dam dpal and bKa' bcu pa Don yod seng ge: To some he also gave a
Guhyasamaja empowerment, to mNga' (74a) bdag
767
and his relatives, to bDag m0
768
and her
relatives, and also to the "uncle-minister" (zhang blonr
9
To uncle minister Nam rnkha' stobs
rgyal and his nephew, he gave the vow of full ordination (upasaIJIPadii) and the pravrajyii vow.
Since at that time he advised themNga' bdag, his wife and his sons to produce a bsTan 'gyur770,
bDag chen ma
77l
said to [Redmda' ba], "This is an advice through which Honorable [you are]
holding us with [your] compassion. We will make it from whatever we receive." [Red mda' ba]
answered, "That is extremely good," and was very delighted.
[Red mda' ba] said: "If they had not accepted, [since] even PaJ;l chen Siikya sri [bhadra] spent all
the offerings received from all over Tibet to erect the [statue of] [B: the Victor] Maitreya of
Khro phu
772
, I had the idea that if! traveled up to Pu rangs
773
, I might receive just enough funds
to complete the bsTan 'gyur. However, it is excellent that the villagers
774
will produce it," and
then [he] gave to bDag chen rna the principal amount as [he had] said: a large [measure] of
254
Chapter 6
silver, five pieces (37a) of brocade that was fme on both sides, one short and one long monk's
'coat'775, one [pair of] Chinese vajra and bell, and a [piece of] white brocade.
Then bDag chen rna took (8336) the responsibility on herself, made great efforts, and completed
[the project] within one year, without any obstacles. Due to this she received the great blessing
of the master and became renowned as a "female sponsor (yon bdag mo) with great merit and de-
termination."
[2.11.48 Consecration Ceremony at rDzong dkar and Production ofbsTan 'gyur]
Then [Redmda' ba] was invited to rDzong dkar
776
for a consecration. When the curtain
777
of the
Guhyasamajamru;H;lala was opened, he performed an extensive siidhana ceremony (sgrub
mchod). The scriptures were auspicious and of great blessing.
778
He performed a magnificent
consecration of the impressive objects of worship and for the wellbeing of the sponsors.
At the time, when large offerings were made to the Honorable, among which the major offerings
were seven coins of pure gold and one pattemed
779
[Chinese] Ta hun upper robe (snam sbyar,
sanghii/iYSo, he gave advice. He (74b) said, "bDag mo, it is said with regard to such activities
performed to make the human life we have attained meaningful: In many sutra sections it is said
that [whoever] has worked for the benefit of the Dharma will become a Buddha themselves781."
[people were saying], "Even if nowadays one is the most powerful govemor
782
in dBus and
gTsang, if [one] suddenly needs ink, paper, or wooden boards, it is extremely difficult to get
them," [and thus Red mda' ba] made a broad dedication that by these roots of virtue [bDag chen
rna] might attainunsurpassable complete Buddhahood.
When about to start the production of the bsTan 'gyur, the HOIiorable had said to Bla rna sGrub
pa dpal: "It seems that we will be able to prepare this bsTan ' gyur without any hindrances. In my
dream I dreamt that a shell hom was played seven times and its sound was heard allover dBus
and gTsang."
[2.11.49 Dream of Attaining Buddhahood before Tsong kha pal
[Red mda' ba also] said: "When I was residing at Rwa sgreng, I dreamt that both [of us] The
Dharma Lord Blo bzang [grags] pa and [1] were on a (37b) large main path, saying that we were
going to become enlightened. [The Dharma Lord] Blo bzang pa was going a little faster.
Wherever there was a stiipa on his way, he was making a circumbulation. I went without making
(8337) [circumbulations] and therefore, saying,'1 have become awakened,' I ascended the big
throne that was there before [him]. At just that moment he arrived too. [I] asked him, 'Please
become awakened.' He replied: 'Master, please, you attain awakening
783
first,' and'then I was
awakened first. [Later] I wondered whether his making circumbulations along the way had been
a [case of his] paying attention to his own benefit."
[Red mda' ba] had limitless qualities like these, that were amazing and marvelous.
English Translation
[2.12 Verse 12: Supporting Studies and Teachings]
[12] Noble, ordained and wealthy people ofthe snow mountains
respectfully invited [you], offered material gifts and service
255
[and] received numerous empowerments, generations of [bodhi]citta and instructions.
I pay homage to you who are worthy of worship by all [sentient beings].
[2.12.1 Sponsoring Supplies such as Ink and Paper]
Concerning these [words], after the great being [Red mda' ba] had achieved fame as a scholar,
, Jam dbyangs Nam mkha' rin chen
784
, who was in a truly high position, [endowed with] (75a) the
seven qUalities of higher rebirth
785
such as [being born in a good] family, (possessing] generosity
and the rest [of these qualities], frequently supported Master [Red mda' ba] and his students
when he was giving teachings. After [his] writings had been produced, he gave [them] to the
intelligent ones. And to those who produced them he gave many supplies such as ink and paper.
Thus he provided what those who were studying [his] writings needed. Even if they had come
from as far off as Bul rong, ['Jam dbyangs Nam mkha' rin chen] gave his support to any hermits
who came from the [various] directions. He provided perfect support (38a) for the carrying out of
studies and meditation, such as writing down and giving to the poor whichever of [Red mda'
ba' s] writings they wished for. He was chief among all the sponsors.
[2.12.2 His Main Sponsor in mNga' ris: Khri rgyal bSod nams Ide]
. Khri rgyal bSod nams Ide (8338) and his wife, who held a high rank by family [both] from the
maternal and paternal lines, supported any master or student who was present for two years.
786
In Nga'ris they also gave their support for the turning of the Wheel of Dharma.
787
Through
giving excellent offerings to the teacher and students, and since they had complete faith, they
were the best sponsors.
[2.12.3 His Main Sponsor in dGa' ba gdong and Rwa sgreng]
sNe'u pa supported the master along with his students while they stayed at dGa' ba gdong and
Rwa sgreng, and also made great offerings [to them].
[2.12.4 His Main Sponsor in gNam rtse Ideng]
When they were staying in gNam rtse ldeng, the governor Yon tan rgya mtsho 788 provided them
continuously with provisions. He also made excellent offerings.
[2.12.5 Further Sponsors]
Gling dkar ba rendered service for their [travels] to and fro, and also made offerings. gNas
snying sTong dpon rGyal mtshan bzang po provided support for (75b) the studies of the master
and students during the time when the teachings took place. 'Bri khung pa chen po Shes rab
dpal
789
made huge offerings of items auch as robes and very imposing white porcelain tea
CUps790. A.carya Seng ge bzang po also supported the teacher by offering a hundred loads of
barley. After Chu 'dus pa
791
[Grags parin chen] had invited them, he made perfect offerings as
256
Chapter 6
support for the turning of the Wheel ofDha=a. In SrI ri 'Dzam bu gling792 [B: Master] bSod
nams ' od zer provided the summer provisions for the masters and students, and then [Red mda'
ba] turned the Wheel of Dharma. In Mang yul Seng ge mkhar the governor bSod nams [B: dGe
, dun] grub supported the master and his students for one month, and then [Red mda' ba] turned
the Wheel of Dha=a. In Lan Ide gung stings Master 'Jam dpal (3Sb) gling pa and his younger
sister supported about 300 masters and students (8339) for three months. They also made perfect
offerings such as robes to the Honorable, and also offered one [set of] robe each to every
hermit.
In dMu rdzing, sTag rtse ba gave the support for the turning the Wheel of Dharma. He rendered
service for the [travels] to and fro of the master and his students and made offerings. In
particular, when [sTag rtse ba] himself passed away, [Red mda' ba] remembered him in his
meditation
793
and was offered the exact am:ount of of 66 dams (ZhO/
94
. The hermits were also
provided with a money offering. The honorable A phyi ba and the uncle minister Kun spangs
795
made good offerings as well. In particular, the service of the honorable [female] 8.ciiry8.
796
was
perfect in that she fully engaged herself in rendering service [to Redmda' bal Also Shes rab pa
and his sibling offered excellent service. Furthe=ore the rich and devout chieftains of mNga' ris
provided service. The Honorable himself made spiritual connections with all the sponsors from
dBus and gTsang by giving them whatever [teachings] were suitable for them (76a) such as
empowe=ents, generations of [bodhi]citta, transmissions through reading (lung), and explana-
tions (khrid)797. Thus he made [the life they had] attained, with its freedoms and opportunities 798,
meaningful. Hence they gained complete faith [in him] as in the actual Buddha himself, and he
became the noble guide for most of the people in the land of snow.
Also [Red mda' ba's] disciples from mDo khams, [i.e. A mdo and Khams] such as Kun mkhyen
Shes rab' od, as well as his disciples from dBus gtsang such as bKa' bcu pa Kun dga' dpal,
respectfully made offerings to him in acccord with their material means.
[2.12.6 Offerings Received from the Chinese Emperor and the King of Guge]
Furthe=ore, from the end of the sky, that is from China, the Ta ming
799
Emperor offered five
pieces of double-sided fine brocade
80o
, a (39a) good upper robe
801
, a short and a long monk's vest
(sku 'gag thung ring) and a short and a long monk's 'coat' (ber thul thung ring/
02
, (8340) a
special monk's hat
803
, shoes, a belt, a rosary, two pairs of vajra and bell, two pairs of small
cymbals, two pieces of small cloth to coverreligious items, two pieces of white brocade, a piece
of cloth to cover food,804 three maQ.gala ornaments
805
, one piece of white sandalwood, and about
fifty rgya rna (= 25 kg) of white tea. From the King of Gu ge
806
, [Red mda' ba] received many
offerings, with fifty zho (= 50 dram = 5 ounces) ofKashrniri saffron among the largest.
[2.13 Verse 13: The Year He Entered into Nirv8.J.la]
[13] After you thought of entering into nirv8.J.la in the year of the dragon,
you entrusted the subtle meanings of what you had heard and understood
as the Buddha entrusted [the responsibility for] the doctrine [to the seven custodians].
I pay homage to you who assiduously teach the Wheel of Dharma.
English Translation
257
[2.13.1 Entrusting the Responsibility for His Doctrine to His Disciples]
Concerning these [words], in the hermitage mTshams Gling rtse dpal
807
in Mang [yul] Gung
[thang], in the [water-male] year C?fthe dragon [1412]808, when [Red mda' ba] was turning the
Wheel of Dharma for about one hundred [B : fifty] sangha members, he knew that he would pass
into nirvfu;ta that year. Up to the age of 65 years
809
he had understood the profound thoughts of
all the buddhas, their children and their disciples through learning, contemplation and medita-
tion. Like the teacher Bhagavat, [who] said again and again to Mahakasyapa (76b), Ananda and
other [disciples], 'I entrust these precious sets of sutras of mine to you! Learn them by heart,
keep them in mind, recite them, master all of them, teach them to others widely,' the great being
[Red mda' ba] taught the whole essence of his practice to his fmal disciples. He continually gave
them instructions on the Five Stages ofGuhyasamiija, two times the Instruction on the View [of
the Middle Way}, and three times the Entrance to .the Middle Way. He also gave [them] a
detailed explanation on the Root [Verses). (39b) In one day he twice taught how to generate (S341)
the mind of aspiration and engagement. Two times he gave a Guhyasamaja empowerment. He
[also] gave a reading transmission of the Oral Instruction "Mound of Gems" (Man ngag rin
chen spungs pa) by ICe sgomrDzong ba [Shes rab rdo rje]81O. To the hermits who had asked for
[this] for many years but to whom he had not given it, he gave the transmissions by reading [his
own] Minor Collected Works (bka' 'bum thor bu) which are the condensed essence of all [his]
discourses (gsung rab).
In a different way than he had taught before, he taught the difficult points by repeating them two
or three times. Again and again he said, "Accordingly gain certainty," and he especially [asked]:
"Are you able to accept that you are not capable of becoming awakened without depending on
this faultless tradition of Arya Nagiirjuna?" Although hti had taught [this] Dharma two or three
times from the beginning up to the end, nobody answered.
What the great being [Redmda' ba] held is [as follows]: [The Buddha] taught no more than two
methods to become awakened, the Vajrayana and the Piiramitayana. And although the main
paths of these [two yiinas] are respectively the completion stage and the perfect view
811
, these
two are only taught by means of different names, [but] in their nature they are merely the
wisdom that [B: realizes] selflessness. He thought that the buddhas of the three times did not
teach any other meaning of the mode of existence than the [B: mode of] existence realized by
this [wisdom], and that the only unmistaken teaching on this [mode of existence] is that of Arya
(77a) Nagiirjuna.
Therefore in the Madhyamakiivatiira
812
scripture it is written:
"Outside the tradition of Arya Nagiirjuna,
there is no means to attain peace (nirvfu;ta)."
[2.13.2 Ceaseless Crying]
On the reason why [Red mda' ba] cried again and again when he was giving empowerments and
several times when [he was teaching] Madhyamaka, [Red mda' ba] (S342) said: "Although I have
258 Chapter 6
taught the sound view ofNagarjuna with the faith and respect I have generated for the Dhanna
and the persons proclaiming the (40a) Dhanna, [my students] only have faith in it, but have not
gained a fault[B: less] understanding of it." Feeling annoyed
8l3
with his disciples, he said: "They
merely talk [pretending to knoW].8l4 When they [actually] know, they say [that] they do not
know. They are greatly distracted."
I [the author] understand, since [he said this] and [since he] saw that the teachipg of the profound
view was disappearing, he became sad and cried.
[2.14 Verse 14: Extending His Life for Seven Days]
[14] After you had taught that all phenomena in satp.sara and nirval}a are unborn,
although you wished to enter into nirval}a, the state oftrue nature (tathatii),
in response to the respectful supplications [made by disciples],
you blessed your life for up to seven days. I pay homage to you.
Concerning these [words], it is said: "Whatever is unborn, is thusness, [i.e., reality, the state of
true nature], and also the mind is free from birth."8l5 This shows that all phenomena in satp.sara
and nirvfu).a, which includes [all] objects and subjects, are unborn. While [Red mda' ba] himself
also wished to enter into the sphere of dhannas, into nirvfu).a, [and] although he presented
himself as if he were sick, in response to the requests of [his] disciples not to enter nirvfu).a, he
blessed his life for up to seven days, then recovered, and said: "There have been many obstacles
for this year's Dhanna [teachings], but they are not of a kind that we have to end [the
teachings]." Then [B: two or three] times he taught the meditative imaginations [B: related to the
Five Stages]816 and the good Instruction on the View [of the Middle Way]. He also completed the
explanations on the [Madhyamaka-Javatara text.
[2.15 Verse 15: Clear Light of Death]
[15] "The clear light of death cannot rely on the body.
After body and mind have separated (77b), the consciousness enters.into emptiness.
The inseparability of sphere and awareness are the clear light."
I pay homage to you who spoke thus again and again.
Concerning these [words], [Red mda' ba said,] "Nowadays (40b) most [teachers who give] oral
instructions [think] that [in the state of] of 'reaching close,817 at the time of the great darkness,
by virtue of calm-abiding (samatha) (8343) our mind remains in our body for a long time, and
[they] accept that this is the clear light of death. But this is the idea neither of siltranor oftantra.
After body and mind become separated, [B: our main consciousness
818
] enters the sphere of
dhannas, the great emptiness, and [thus this] sphere [of dhannas] and [our main] conscious-
ness
8l9
become inseparable. [B: From here two folios of the Tibetan-style book are missing.]820 This insepa-
rability is called 'the clear light of death.' If I explain it in this way, many will oppose it. But
there is no other choice but to say this. All of you must keep this in mind!" He said this many
times.
English Translation
259
[2.16 Verse 16: Consciousness Transference]
[16] After having meditated previously [and] given meaning to the oral instruction on the
transference [of co'nsciousness]"
not forgetting the signs, having entered the clear light with joy,
you arose from [meditative absorption in] cessation and migrated, propelled by what had
preceded.
I pay homage to you who acts in accord with the words.
Concerning these [words] [Red mda' ba] said: "Although nowadays, at the time of death, a
practice called 'performance of [consciousness] transference,821 is widespread, it is performed
for those whose outer breathing
822
has not stopped. It is also performed after outer breathing has
stopped, but then [the person] has no opportunity to hear [what is recited]. And even if [people]
have previously [received] oral instructions on the crucial points of [consciousness 1 transference
[and] have experience in meditation on it, [still] the transference is performed by others in order
to make unclear [one's memories of the oral instructions and one's experience] clear
823
. But if
one shows the transference to ordinary persons who have not received the oral instructions, it
will be not of any benefit to them. Instead it would be more meaningful [for them] to say names
and dhiirmJis
824
that have blessings.
People who possess the oral instructions should at the time of death remember those oral
instructions on [consciousness] transference that they have meditated on well before. Meanwhile
(78a) [they should] first strongly and purposefully think, 'May I be reborn in such and such a
place.' And then without forgetting the signs ofthedissolution
825
of the four elements and the
signs of the arising of the three appearances, when [all] the signs are completed (S344) they
should generate great joy, thinking: 'Now I have manifested the clear light which is the ultimate
truth.' And like a son who goes with a joyful mind into the house of his father, one should enter
into the sphere of dharmas. This is what is called 'the manifestation of the clear light of death.'
Although in that state the conceptual thought of consciousness transference does not exist, due
to the power of what had preceded one has the ability to propel [one's consciousness] to the
desired place of birth. This is what is called the 'performance of [consciousness] transference.'
When the hearers
826
enter into meditative absorption in cessation (nirodhasamiipatti)827, even if
they stay up for many days, months or years in meditative absorption and although they are not
aware of arising from that state of meditative absorption, due to the power of the previous
impetus they arise without delay. For example, ifbefore falling asleep [you] internally make the
plan to rise early and then fall asleep, although in the state of sleeping you do not have the
thought of waking up, due to this impetus you wake up early."
This is what [Redrnda' ba] said, and when [he] passed into nirvfu].a, he also manifested in accord
with what he had taught.
260
Chapter 6
[2.17 Verse 17: Passing Away at the Time ofthe Clear Light of Death]
[17] After you turned the profound and vast Wheel of Dharma
for your direct disciples of this life,
at the time ofthe clear light of death you passed away for the benefit of others.
I pay homage to you who attained power over birth and death.
Concerning these [words], in the way mentioned above
828
[Redmda' ba] finished turning all the
wheels ofDhanna for the gatherings of [his direct] disciples. In accordance with each and every
one's fortune, [he taught them] how to become omniscient
829
by [realizing] both the profound
ultimate truth as well as the vast conventional truth. [Red mda' ba] himself (78b) had no fear,
dread or anxiety of nirvfu}.a. (8345)
The [female] Mahiisiddha of Acarya Sangs rgyas dpal said, "If [he] does not perform the long
life rite
830
, the life span will be short." [She] asked him to perform a long life rite. Thereupon
[Red mda' ba] replied, "At the age of sixty, in spite of health problems,831 I have extended my
life up to the age of sixty-five
832
This time I will not arrange a ceremony to extend [my] life."
And in the morning, when the disease had been turned away, teacher rGyal bzang made
prostrations and requested the Honorable, "Please remain stable for the benefit of the [Buddha's]
doctrine and sentient beings." Thereupon [Red mda' ba] said: "Now, I have no other thought
than 'May I [only] be sick for a short time and die with less pain.' There is no lingering thought
that, 'This activity is not really completed.'"
[2.17.1 Advice From ills Minor Works: Joyful Song of Assurance of No Regret]
"(1) Whenever I go for refuge, may the three infallible jewels
constantly remain as an ornament on the crown of my head, without separating [from me].
[1] the hermit who practice the illusion-like yoga of appearance and emptiness
take up this [experience] in a song of remorselessness.
(2) No chain offood and wealth is left behind in my tracks.
Ahead [of me ]833 there is no embarrassing accumulation of bad kanna.
My Mahayana precepts have degenerated neither in motivation nor in deed.
Now, although my illusion-like body and mind are separating, [1 feel] no regret.
(3) Here the Minor Works and Zhal gdams have another verse that is missing from manuscript A.
834
(4) 1 have the wisdom that comprehends illusions wherever they appear.
1 have the extraordinary attitude that cognizes the six [types of] living beings as [my] parents.
1 have the practice that unifies means and wisdom.
Now, although my illusion-like body and mind are separating, [1 feel] no regret.
(5) At the beginning 1 trained myself according to the meaning of the canonical texts.
In the middle 1 explained them to the gatherings of [my] intelligent disciples.
In the end I single-pointedly meditated on the meanings I was intimately acquainted with.
Now, although my illusion-like body and mind are separating, [I feel] no regret.
English Translation
261
(6) I cherished the Victor's doctrine more than my life.
I analyzed in a correct (8346) way whether it is reasonable or not reasonable.
Through exposition, debate and composition I made [my life] with its freedoms and opportuni-
ties meaningful.
Now, although my illusion-like body and mind are separating, [I feel] no regret.
(7) This joyful song of assurance of no regret
I sang at the slope of Gangs bu Ie
for the people who were devout followers of me.
Ifpeople want to act like me, then do it like this.
(8) Here tbeAlinor Works have another verse that is missing in manuscript A."835
As has been said [and] as was mentioned above, [Red mda' ba] extensively taught the meditative
imagination of the clear light of death, and then said, "The teachings will be over in the
morning."
[2.17.2 Entering into NirviiJ!a in 1412]
In the morning he fixed a time
836
to teach the Dharma, [but] presented himself as sick. He did not
have any pain, but simply did not give the teaching, and did not pay any attention to the dough
[that was to be his meal]. He did not interrupt the stages of his meditation process
837
, and
performed the [consciousness] transference in the way he had asserted it.
At sunrise of the 29th day of the tenth month in the year of the [water]-dragon [1412]838 he dem-
onstrated how to enter nirvii.l;ta, while his body [changed into] the form body (riipakiiya) and the
clear light into the truth body (dharmakiiya). He had obtained power over birth and death, since
he had intentionally accepted [his] existence [in saMsiira] and [intentionally] entered nirvii.l;ta.
[2.18 Verse 18: Attainment ofthe State ofVajradhara]
[18] Your perfect illusory body, which is conventional truth,
manifested as the clear light, the ultimate truth.
[You] have attained the unified state ofVajradhara.
I pay homage to you who have accomplished spontaneity of activity.
Concerning these [words], by the power of the previous impetus [Red mda' ba] arose from the
clear light of death as an illusory body in the intermediate state
839
and thus achieved the enjoy-
ment body (saIpbhogakiiya) that is the perfect conventional truth and has the major and minor
marks complete. On this basis he performed the actual manifestation ofthe truth body, which is
the clear light [that realizes the] perfect ultimate truth. This [means] he achieved the unifying
(8347) state ofVajradhara that is endowed with the eight powerful attainments
84o
. By the four
types of activity - pacifying, extending, dominating and wrathful activities, he uninterruptedly
acts without effort and spontaneously for the benefit of others (79b). Thus he dries up the ocean
of suffering in sarrsiira.
262 Chapter 6
[2.19 Verse 19: Trembling of the Earth and Other Signs]
[19] At the time when you passed on to another buddhafield, the great earth trembled,
I pay homage to you who were invited [there],
by the viras, fjiikinis and deities who had assembled
c
and who made outer, inner, and secret offerings from the state oftrue nature [to you].
Concerning these [words], at the time when noble beings are born, tum the Wheel ofDha=a or
enter into nirviil;la, the earth trembles without harming the world. Thus it says in a siltra, and it
was clear to all [the people present] that it happened as stated.
Viras, q.iikinis and deities who like whatever tends towards virtue, niigas and other [beings]
assembled in the sky. Each one of them made offerings in accord with their capacity, and by
offering the five desirable outer offerings84!, the inner offerings
842
of five meats and five nectars,
the secret offerings
843
of the bliss of the four j oys844, and the suchness offering
845
of the view that
realizes the [true] mode of existence [of all phenomena], they invited the great being [Redmda'
ba] to the place of his destination.
There arose inconveivable sounds of conches and great drums that could be heard by everybody.
A lovely scent that had never been experienced before was repeatedly observed by everyone. In
the night, Master bSod nams grags pa and some others saw the entire residence filled with light.
There occurred these and other inconceivable signs of virtue.
[2.20 Verse 20: Signs at the Time of Cremation]
[20] At the time when your body melted into the fire of wisdom,
there were no clouds in the sky and the wind in the space became still too.
Due to your blessing the heat on the earth rose as in the summer,
(8348) I pay homage to you who attained power over dependent arising.
Concerning these [words], after [they] had opened the curtain of a Guhyasama jarmlI].gala, [they]
perfo=ed a large siidhana ceremony. And at the time, when [Red mda' ba's] body, which was
a fully ripened [ka=ic result], had been purified by the fire of the five wisdoms, in that very
moment the sky brightened as it was freed of clouds and all else that shrouded it, and (80a) it
revealed itself fully in its natural [blue] vaiq.urya color. The atmosphere was free of wind, sand-
sto=s and other particles. Suddenly great heat spread on the earth. The danger of coldness was
thus removed. "Due to your blessing as in the summer" means: [Red mda' ba] had achieved
power over the elements that are dependently related. All understood that this was [due] to the
power of his pure view.
[2.21 Verse 21: Division ofthe Relics]
[21] As the Buddha's relics were divided into eight portions,
similarly your relics were invited by the countless devout gods and human beings
into the ten directions to become an object of worship,
I pay homage to you who increased [his] relics.
English Translation
263
Concenling these [words], in earlier times, when in the land of the Malla
846
beneath two
847
siila
848
trees the Bhagavat passed into nirvfu;ta, the relics of his body aggregate
849
were divided into eight
portions for gods, niigas and human beings. Similarly it became known that shares of this great
being [Red mda' ba's] relics, which were endowed with the essence of his blessing, were also
invited by non-human beings such as gods and niigas [to their realms]. This was proved by
common perception at the time, when the crematory relic building was opened . and some
marrow-bones
85o
of his hands and feet were missing.
The remaining [relics] were [meant] to be put into indoor objects, outdoor objects, and statues,851
and after they had been given to the supreme among [his] disciples, headed by The Dharma Lord
Blo bzang grags pa, to [his] ordained disciples, to the supreme among his sponsors, Khri (8349)
bSod nams rgyal mtshan, and to [his] lay followers, headed by the sDe pa852 and his sibling, the
[relics] became objects of worship in the places of gods and niigas as well as among all [the
people] of the snowy Tibet.
[2.22 Verse 22: Request to Remain as a Protector for His Disciples]
[22] From what [I have] seen, heard, remembered, [physically] touched and [know from]
stories told,
[you] act [as] protector, refuge and comrade in this (41a) life, in future lives, and in the
intermediate states.
Glorious Red mda' ba, infallible object of refuge,
I pay homage to you the holy supreme leader.
Concenling these [words], for the disciples who see the body of the glorious teacher, hear his
voice, remember his qualities, are touched by his activity and recite his name, [Red mda' ba]
became a beneficial protector for this life, a refuge for future [lives] and a true comrade for the
intermediate state. I [the author] and all the other disciples with our three doors [body, speech
and mind] respectfully take refuge and pay homage to the holy supreme leader, who is for the
time being and ultimately a completely infallible object of refuge.
Offerings [to you]!
Praise [to you] !
Please, always take care of us!
[2.23 Verses 23-33: Lamentation for the Lost Master]
[23] Alas, the life tree ofthe doctrine is broken.
The holders of the Doctrine, the sangha [members], have scattered in the ten directions.
[24] Alas, the victory banner of liberation has fallen down.
Those who wish for liberation have lost the path of liberation.
[25] Alas, the enjoyment of elegant sayings has declined.
The cord of hope for the clear-minded is cut off.
264 Chapter 6
[26] Alas, the sun of [right] view has set.
Who [will] explain the excellenttradition offather Nagarjuna and his [spiritual] children?
[27] Alas, the ocean of Dharma is dry.
Who [will] maintain the teaching tradition ofthe brothers Asanga [andyasubandhu]?
[28] Alas, scripture and reasoning, which are like the incisor and claws [of a lion], have
become dispersed.
Who [will] spread the logical system of Dignaga and Dharmaklrti (S350)?
[29] Alas, the vessel of moral conduct is destroyed.
Who [will] uphold the vow lineage of Gu:gaprabha and Sakyaprabha?
[30] Alas, the sequence of abandonment and realization has become disordered.
Who [will] proclaim (41b) the elegant sayings of Aryavimuktisena and Haribhadra?
[31] Alas, the blessings of experience and realization have disappeared.
Whom [will] we request for the oral instructions of Tilopa and Naropa?
[32] Alas, benefit and happiness have closed like lotus flowers [in a] pond.
The doctrine of expounding and practicing [the Dharma] were simultaneously lost.
[33] Alas, [we] pitiful [people] have fallen into despair,
devoid of the fortune to see you [any longer] with [our] eyes.
[2.24 Verse 34: Request for Blessings]
[34] [We] do not have the merit to hear your speech [any longer] with [our] ears.
Wherever your mind is, please bless us.
[2.24.1 Closing Rituals, Final Offerings and Construction of Objects of Worship]
On ways of offering after [his cremation]: For eighteen days Master bSod nams grags pa to-
gether with more than one hundred disciples respectfully conducted prayers by opening the
curtains of the following great inner and outer rna/pjaZas: Master bSod nams grags pa and Chen
po Chos dpal
853
lead prayers to Hevajra, Acarya Yi dam dpal and Master Yon tanrgyal to Sarva-
vid [V airocana], Master rGyal bzang, the hennits to the [two] main meditational deities
854
of The
Dhanna Lord [Red mda' ba] - SrI Guhyasamaja and the Bhagavat CakrasaIp.vara
855
, and and
[further] sangha members, led by bKa' bzhi pa acaryas, made [B: prostrations and] offerings to
the eight sugatas
856
I myself [the author] offeredsiidhana ceremonies such as the Guru Puja and
made prayers.
(42a). At that time the custom officer spent from his own wealth
857
to pay for what it covered and
the rest was paid for three days by the custom officer of the palace (khab nang so), for two days
by bDag chen rna (S351) and by [others] headed by the honarable [female] acarya for three days.
Mainly from the [funds raised] in relation to the relics they covered [the costs of] offering
service and worship to the sangha members. [B: And from their own belongings they made per-
English Translation
265
fect offerings to the large Gung thang study center (ehos sdey58 by distributing provisions, com-
munity tea and a money offering to the rows of their members, They also offered provisions to-
gether with a money offering to the rows. of members of the meditation center (sgrub sde) bSam
gtan gling
859
.] .
As an indoor object of worship (nang rten) similar in size to the self-arisen statue of Arya [Va
til, a [statue of] the venerable Maiijusrl together with a throne and backrest was erected.
860
The
main sponsors ofthe fee, provisions and the rest [of what was needed] to produce it from copper
and gold were the estate executors of the Honorable. In addition, disciples with faith in him,
headed by bDag chen rna (Slb), also made contributions. The custom officer himself spent the
exact amount, that is whatever riches were given to him. Thereafter [Red mda' ba's relics in the
MaiijusrI statue] were 'invited' to please remain in the Arya [Va til temple in Mang yul [Gung
thang], and Chos dpal, the great sponsor of the statue there, took the responsibility [for inviting
it there] and made an offering in front of where [the statue] was staying in the assembly hall. He
offered a seal made from silver (dngul dam), in addition to the butter lamp (kong buy61 that the
great being [Red mda' ba] himself (42b) had offered in front of the 10 bo, and he put up another
good butterlamp .
.Acarya Yon [tan] rin [chen] functioned as the main caretaker of the objects of worship. Master
rGyal bzang pa and his attendant mChog legs engaged themselves fully [in this.]
[B: Furthermore [offerings] were made to the large main seats (gdan sa ehen mo), mainly to Bo
dong
862
, sNar thang, Zha lu
863
, gNas mying, Chos 'khor sgang
864
, the glorious gSang phu Ne'u
thog andRi bo dGe 'pheI
865
The [members of these ] great study centers (ehos gra ehen po) were
also provided with tea as much as was appropriate along with a money offering [to everybody].
Also in the presence of The Dharma Lord BIo bzang grags pa an indoor object of worship was
erected, a statue equal in size to the [statue of] venerable MaiijusrI. This stays in Ri bo dGe
'pheI
866
].
[2.25 Verse 35: Confession and Reqnest for Forbearance any Fault Committed]
[35] From the huge ocean of [your] excellent qualities,
[I have] taken just [as much as] a drop of water, and whatever mistakes there are,
I openly express and confess them all.
I beg the resident group of close disciples and attendants to forgive [those faults].
[2.26 Verse 36: Author's Colophon]
[36] After having been exhorted by the spiritual guide bSod nams grags pa and others,
the most inferior among his countless disciples, the mNga' ris pa
who has achieved unfailing faith, (S352) Sangs rgyas rtse mo, has composed
this amazingly wonderful biography of [his] master.
266 Chapter 6
[2.27 Verse 37: Dedication and Request for Blessing]
[37] After my mind has gathered together this virtue with other roots of virtue (43.),
[I] offer [them] to [my] supreme teacher with respect. Due to this
may all intentions of [the] holy teacher be fully accomplished, and
[may I] be blessed by [his] body, speech and mind.
To explain a detailed and comprehensive biography [of Red mda' ba] (82a) is beyond my mental
capacity. And [also], although [what is reported here comes] directly from the honorable [Red
mda' ba,] [B: the great being], he did not intentionally say [to me as his biographer]: "I have
done this, or it happened that way." Furthe=ore there was nobody I could ask who was familiar
with [him] through offering regular services. Because of these [circumstances] for all the heaps
offaults [that occurred] such as not following a strict chronological order, I appeal for forgive-
ness.
May this [biography] be extensively spread in all directions, at all times and in all situations. I
have compiled this text in the rKang tshugs phug he=itage
867
, a cave that used to be the dwell-
ing-place of the powerful great Mi la ras pa.
May it tum to virtue and goodness!
[A: [This] is in short [a collection of] the statements of the great venerable Red mda' ba.
May it be auspicious! ]
[This has been] most thoroughly proofread once.
[B: May there be purity in all the world!]
The Writings of Red mda' ba
As explained in the introduction, the Minor Works (gSung thor bu) of Red mda' ba form the
only volume of the Collected Works (gsung 'bum) that we have so far (volume nga). The Col-
lected Works of Red mda' ba have been contained in 12 volumes
868
So far we have no catalog,
but various sources of information as well as several works that survived separately from which
we can "reconstruct" the Collected Works, although we do not know the sequence in which they
were ordered in the gSung 'bum. Thus the following list of his works and the following table of
concordance are almost arranged according to the order in which they occure in Sangs rgyas rtse
mo. The list and the table follow the same chronological order and are followed by a provisional
catalog of the Minor Works.
(1) rGyas jJa 'i bstan bcos tshad ma rnam 'grel gyi 'grel pa, Rigs pa 'i 'dod 'jo zhes bya ba pu
sti gcig longpa ("Wish-granting Cow of Reasoning, " Detailed Treatise on the 'PramcIIJa-
vo.rttika ,), one whole volume
869
(2) rNam 'grel rgyan gyi 'grel bshad chen mo (Explanat01Y Commentary on the 'Pramo.1Ja-
vo.rttiko.larpko.ra ')
(3) Tshad ma rnam 'grel spyi don (Red mda' ba 's Overview of Pramo.1Ja)
(4) Sher phyin mngon rtogs rgyan gyi pko. nyi ma'i 'od zer (Sunbeams, Commentary on the
'Prajfio.po.ramito.-Abhisamayo.larpko.ra ,), also called Phar phyin gyi {lko. nyi ma 'i 'od zer
(Sunbeams, Commentary on po.ramito.l
70
(5) Dam pa 'i chos mngon pa kun las btus pa 'i snyingpo legs bshad nor bu 'i phreng ba (Jewel
Necklace of Good Explanations, the Essence of the Supreme Teaching 'Abhidharma-
samuccaya') also referred to as mNgon pa kun las btus pa 'i rgya cher bshad pa legs par
bshad pa'i rgya mtsho (Ocean of Good Sayings, an Extensive Explanation on the
'Abhidharmasamuccaya ')871 .
(6) Dam pa'i chos mngon pa mdzod kyi pko. (Commentary on the Supreme Teaching
'Abhidharmakosa '
(7) Dam pa 'i chos mngon pa mdzod kyi bsdus don (Summarizing Overview of the Supreme
Teaching 'Abhidharmakosa ')
(8) 'Dul ba mdo rtsa'i rnam bshad dri ma med pa'i rgyan (Ornament of Flawlessness,
Explanation of the 'Vinayasiitra ,), also referred to as Vinayasiitrapko.
872
(9) 'Dul ba 'i las chog (Vinaya Acts and Rites [Karmavo.canaJ)
268 Chapter 7
(10) dBu ma rtsa ba 'i 'grel pa 'thad pa 'i snang ba (Light of Logic, Commentary on the 'Miila-
madhyamakakiirikii ')873
(11) dBu ma la jug pa'i mam bshad de kho na nyid gsal ba'i sgron ma (Lamp, which
Elucidates Reality, Explanation of the 'Madhyamakiivatiira ')
(12) Byang chub sems dpa'i mal 'byor spyod pa bzhi brgya pa 'i 'grel pa tshig don gsal ba
(Clarifying the Meaning of the Words, Commentary on 'The Yogic Deeds of the Bodhi-
sattvas, The Four Hundred,). Short title: dBu ma bzhi brgya pa 'i pkii (Commentary on the
Madhyamaka work 'CatubSataka ,)874
(13) Tshigs gsal stong thun mams kyi tlkii (Overview Commentary (sTong thun) on 'Clear
Words (Prasannapadii) ')
(14) dPal gsang ba 'dus pa 'i 'grel pa sgron ma gsal ba dang bcas pa 'i bshad sbyar yid kyi mun
sel shes bya ba'i legs bshad rgya mtsho'i tshogs (Collection of an Ocean of Good
Explanations called "ll/uminating the Darkness of Mind, " a Commentary on 'Sri Guhya-
samiija Pradlpoddyotana together with a Connected Explanation (Upanibandhana) '), also
referred to as gSang 'dus stong thun (Guhyasamiija Compendium)
(15) dPal gsang ba 'dus pa'i dkyi/ 'khor du dbang bskur ba'i cho ga'i rim pa don gsal
(Clarifying the Meaning of the Stages of the Rites of Bestowal of Empowerment in the
Ma1JrJala of Sri Guhyasamiija) also referred to as gSang 'dus mngon rtogs bdag jug
mchod phreng (Clear Realization [of the Deity], Self-empowerment and [Arranging] a
Garland, i.e., Rows ofOfferingsl
75
(16) rGyud bla 'i dka' 'grel dgongs zab snang ba (Light of the Profound Intention, a Commen-
tary on the Difficult Points of the Uttaratantral
76
also referred to as Theg pa chen po
rgyud bla ma'i pkii (Commentary on the Higher Mahiiyiina Teaching (Mahiiyiinottara-
tantra)).
(17) Lung kun las btus pa 'i tlkii. Lam rim blo sbyong sogs kyi skor la (Commentary on the
'Siitrasamuccaya '. On the Stages on the Path and Mental Purification.f77
(18) bShes pa 'i springs yig gi 'grel pa don gsal (Commentary, Clarifying the Meaning of the
'Su/:lrllekha ')878
(19) gSung thor bu (Minor Works), volume 5 (nga) of the gSung 'bum
879
Red mda' ba gzhon nu blo gros kyi gsung 'bum nga pa 'i dkar chag (Index of vol. nga of
the Collected Works of Red mda' ba gzhon nu blo gros) - print in dbu can published by
IBA2007:
(19.1) rJe btsunredmda' ba'i gsung 'bum thor bu las bstodpa'i tshogsmams bzhugs so
(A Collection of Praises from the Minor Works of rJe btsun Red mda' ba) 1-48
(19.2) 'Phags pa mam par 'thag pa 'i mdo'i dum bu bzhugs so (Section of the Aryavai-
dalyasiitra) 49-79
The Writings of Red mda' ba
269
(19.3) rJe btsun chen po'i red mda' ba'i gsung 'bum thor bu las tshigs bcad kyi tshogs
'ga' bzhugs so (Some Collections of Verses from the Minor Works of the great
rJe btsun Red mda' ba) 81-97
(19.4) sPring yig gi tshogs bzhugs so (Collection of Letters) 99-132
(19.5) Phan byed gzhan 1a gdams pa 'doms pa'i skor bzhugs so (On Advices given to
Benefit Others) 133-180
(19.6) gZhan gyi the tshom se1 byed dris Ian gyi skor bzhugs so (On Replies [ Given] to
Clear Away the Doubts of Others) 181-318
(19.7) dPal duskyi 'khorlo'ingesdongsal bar byedparinpo che'i sgronmazhes bya
ba bzhugs so ("Precious Lamp, "Elucidating the Definite Meaning of Sri Kala-
cakra) 319-388
Concordance: The Collected Works of Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros (1348-1412) Preserved or Mentioned in Catalogues or Lists
Text no. Catalogue or Control No.1 Reference (page no.) I Database Code I Shelf Mark I Section no. in Sangs rgyas rtse mo
Title see List I MHTL# Ku sep. LC# TBRCcode Other # GRAGS AAI SANGS
I 11822 40.13-15 99950869 W452 CPN# I: M IV 262/6 2.5.4
vol.1 005148(7)
2 11821 W451 2.5.4
3 11820 W450 2.5.4
4 11521 40.18-19 W461 596.20 2.5.5
5 11522 40.16 99950869 WOOKG02745 611.23 1: M IV 262/6 2.5.6
voI.2,1-86 dbu medms.
6 11678 40.15-16 2.5.6
7 11678 2.5.6
8 11722 40.15 583.11 2.5.7
9 11723 2.5.7
10 11349 40.16-17 99950869 W457 588.26- 1: M IV 267016 2.5.8
vo 1.2,149-472 589.1
11 11349 40.17 2005323052 W458 Otani 1: MIV262/6 2.5.8
W26176 11548 1: M IV 262/3
Text no. Catalogue or Control No.1 Reference (page no.) 1 Database Code 1 Shelf Mark 1 Section no. in Sangs rgyas rtse mo
Title see List 1 MHTL# Ku sep. LC# TBRCcode Other # GRAGS AAI SANGS
!
12 11349 40.17-18 99940066 W21913 1: M IV 262/5 2.5.8
I
W459-
I
IOOKG03547
I
dbu medms.
13 11350 2.5.8
14 11943 40.19 W462 2.5.9
WOOKG02739
dbu medms.
15 11945 W464 2.5.9
WOOKG02740 2.7.9.3
dbu medms.
16 11340 40.18 W455 611.7 2.7.9.2
17 11089 W454 2.7.9.3
18 11088 41.1 83902987 W453 1: M IV 262/1 2.7.9.3
1: M IV 262/2
1: M IV 262/4
19 WICZ1871 2.7.9.3
dbu medms.
272
Chapter 7
The Minor Works of Red mda' ba
The following catalog is based on a digital text of a cursive manuscript of Red mda' ba gzhon nu
blo gros kyi gsung thor bu, TBRC code WI CZ1871. In December 2004 I was informed by Gene
E. Smith that they are holding the Minor Works ofRedmda' ba. He kindly ientme a draft of the
cataloging made by a Tibetan colleague early on that he checked against the third volume of the
Beijing catalogue (Mi rigs dpe mdzod khang, Shes bya' gter mdzod 1997). I have proofread and
corrected it, wherever I noticed any mistake and also added some information, partly with the
assistance ofTenzin Lungtok, A.carya candidate ofthe CIHTS. The figures 001, 002 etc. refer to
the page numbers of the TBRC pdf file 004546
88
. For more details on the Minor Works (gSung
thor bu) see also chapter 4.
001: 004546
Red mda' ba'i gsung
002: empty
003: p. I a (title page) - unreadable
004-006:pp.1b-2b2
Stanzas expressing worship
In detail:
004: p. 1 b
88
!
Illustration left side: Ma ti PaJ). chen la na mo
Illustration right side: Lo tsa ba Byang chub rtse mo la na mo
004: p. Ibl-1b7
Expressing Worship (for the dKar chag)
01]1 svasti/
followed by three stanzas (four lines and fifteen syllables each)
dge legs shar ri' i rtse mo las 'ongs thun mtshams sprin gyi bla gos ' chang/
( ... )
'phags pa'i dge 'dun rgya mtsho'i tshogs mams 'dzin ma'i dbus 'dir rgyal gyur cig/
004-006:pp.lb7-2b2
Expressing Worship (for the gSung thor bu)
eight verses ( four lines) and one verse (two lines), nine syllables each
mtho ris bdag po rtsug na zla ba dang/
( ... )
snang ba skyed pa'i bshes gnyen rta bdun rgyal/
006-006: p. 2b2-2b5
Author's Resolution t ~ compose the dK.ar chag (four lines, nine syllables each)
de !tar bshes gnyen ( ... ) tshoms su sdeb par bya/
The Writings of Red mda' ba
dKar ehag of the praises given below (bsngags pa brjod pa - 11 lines, nine syllables each)
gang la bstod cing bsngags pa brjod pa yis/
'phral dang yun gyi phan bde rna Ius pal
rnyur du rtsol ba'i rnchog gsum bla rna dang/
yi dam Iha la bstod tshig , digo C di dag go 7)/
Ita khrid gsang ba 'dus pa'i rgyud 'debs dang/
'dzam gling rgyan drug rndog lod kun dga' dpal/
blo bzang grags pa'i dpalla bstod pa dang/
gsang 'dus dkyil 'khor Iha yi bstod pa dang/
rje btsun 'jam dbyangs spyan ras gzigs rngon dang/
sgroI rna marns kyi bstod pa'i phreng ba dang/
phar phyin drug gi bsngags pa ' di narns sol /
006-015:pp.2b5-7a
Actual dKar chag of gSung thor bu
see below 74), 75)
see below 1),78)
see below 2)
see below 3)
see below 4),5)
see below 6)
see below 7)
273
1.1 rJe btsun red mda' ba gzhon nu blo gros kyi gsung 'bum gyi dkar chag Cdi'i dbu Ideb
kyi mdun ngos mi gsal bas rntshan byang dngos gang yin rna shes -refers to la) pp.I-7
rndzad pa po sgra tshad smra ba 'jam dbyangs grags pa (7a3-4)
bskul ba po red rnda' pa'i slob rna dpalldan rngon (7a3)
In detail:
006: p. 2b5-2b7
dK.ar chag of the autobiography (rang mam) which follows below no. 8) - 10) (six lines, nine
syllables each):
rang nyid dam pa'i tshul dang rnthun byas nasi
skalldan gzhan la'ang 'di bzhin 'dorns po zhes/
mam thar rndo tsam ston byed ' di dag go/ /
dge sbyong tshulla gdams pa'i tshigs bcad dang/
rang nyid ' gyod rned gdeng ldan ' gyur rna dang/
rten 'breI de kho na nyid rab byed dol /
006-007: pp. 2b7-3a6
dKar ehag ofthe gSung thor bu
24 lines, nine syllables each
'chos skyon gnyis Idan rang gzhan ston pa'i gsung/
spyi dang bye brag phra rno'i gzhung mams la/
dgongs 'breI man ngag zab rno rdo rje'i glu/
sna tshogs don ldan legs bshad 'di dag golf
serns la bskul ba'i tshigs bead 'dod pa yi/
nyes dmigs bstan pa'i tshigs su bead pa dang/
see below 11)
see below 12)
274 Chapter 7
gsal byed bya dka'i tshig gi sbyor ba ba dang!
las mams 'byed pa'i rab tu byed pa dang!
smon lam tshigs gcad gzhi lam 'bras bu'i tshul!
gsal byed phyag rgya chen po rdo rje'i glul
Ita sgom spyod 'bras rdo rje'i glu dang nil
gzhan yang Ita sgom spyod 'bras tshigs bcad dang!
tshad rna rtag pa tshad ma'i yul dang nil
yul can brtag pa'i rab tu byed pa dang!
sel pa brtag pa theg gsum 'phags lIlilgon rtogs!
mam rig grub brgyan theg chen dbu rna lugs!
gsal bor byed pa'i gzhi lam 'bras gsum dang!
byang chub sems gnyis bsgoro pa'i man ngag gil
khrid yig thog rna bar dang tha rna gsuml
theg chen blo sbyong lugs kyi man ngag dang!
gsang 'dus rim lnga'i snying po mdor bsdus pal
dus kyi 'khar lo'i nges don gsal byed sgronl
rgyud bla'i dgongs bshad rab zab snang ba dang!
'phags pa roam par 'thag pa'i mdo 'grello!!
007-008: pp. 3a6-3b3 .
dKar chag of the gSung thor bu to be continued
see below 13) 7
see below 14)
see below 15)
see below 16)
see below 17)
see below 18)
see below 19)
see below 20)
see below 21)
see below 22)
see below 23)
see below 24)
see below 75)7
see below 80)
see below 27), 28)
see below 30)
one verse (five lines) and 3 verses (four lines), nine syllables each
snyigs ma'i dus 'dir lugs ngan zla ba yis!
bstan pa pad roo'i tshal 'di zum dogs nasi
ston dang bstan 'dzin pad roo'i gnyen roams lal
chos dang chos min roam 'byed rigs pa'i lam!
'doms tshig spring yig skya ring 'di mams so!!
rang gi ston la 'phrin du gsol ba dang!
dus kyi 'khor lo'i tshig don la dpyadte!
bstan 'dzin mams la phrin du gsol ba dang!
phrin yig rang la 'gal spong dris Ian dang!
rigs ldan 'jam dbyangs naro mkha' rin chen lal
phul ba'i phrin yig zab mo'i lam dang nil
rang gi slob rna mdo sngags 'dzin pa'i mchog!
blo bzang grags pa'i dpalla snga phyi ru!
gnang ba'i phrin yig thog mtha' bar gsum dang!
gong rna ta'i ming can gyi!
'ja' sa gos dar sogs kyi'skyes Ian du!
phul ba'i phrin yig dga' ba bskyed pa'o!!
see below 31)
see below 34)
see below 32)
see below 33)
see below 35),36),37)
see below 38)
The Writings of Red mda' b.a
008-009: pp. 3b3-4a2
dKar chag of the gSung thor bu to be continued
25 lines, nine syllables each
gang gi legs bshad nyi ma'i 'od zer gyis/
gzhan blo som nyi'i mun pa phyir gsal tel
skalldan don gyner dri ba yid kyi mtshor/
Ian tshig don Idan pad mo'i tshal 'di lags/
bka' bzhi mam mkha' od kyis dris pa'i Ian!
dbu rna bden gnyis gnas kyi zla tsher dang/
10 tstsha don bzang rtse chen mkhan po'i Ian!
dge bshes shes rab grags kyi Ian tshig dang/
skyor mo lung pa sakya seng ge'o//
bo dong mkhan po chos kyi rgyal mtshan dang/
x x chos rgyal ' od zer rgyal mthsan dang/
bla rna sgrub pa dpal gyi zhus Ian gsum/
sngags ' chang kun zla don kun gnyis kyi' all
gzhan kun gnyis dang mkhan dbon gnyis kyi'o//
dge bshes pang slob skyid grong dbon po dang/
bka' bcu 'dzin pa bde legs dpal ba'i Ian!
stag rtse dbon po bde legs dpal ba dang/
bka' bcu pa yon tan rgyal mtshan gyi/
dge bshes mchog bzang mi nyag rin chen dpal/
chu 'dus thugs rje rin chen zhus Ian dang/
dge bshes sangs rgyas dpal gyi zhu Ian gnyis/
seng ge rgyal mtshan dge bshes grags rin dang/
brtson 'grus dpal dang slob dpon grags rgyal sogs/
den gnyer bshegs gnyen rang rang the tshom gyi
dris Ian nor bu'i phreng ba 'di mams la'o//
009-010: pp. 4a2-4b5
dl(ar chag of the gSung thor bu to be continued
41 lines, nine syllables each
dad dang blo gros Idan pa zab mo'i snod!
skalldan yid kyi mun gter snyog gral du/
dam pa'i gangs ri las 'ongs gtsang ba'i gnad/
gdams pa'i chu phran phan pa 'di mams sol
lung rigs rgya mtsho'i mthar son chos kyi rje/
grags pa rgyal mtshan pa la phul ba dang/
see below 39)
ePN 6117 (30)?
see below 40), 41)
see below 42)
see below 43)
see below 44)
see below 45), 46)
see below 47),48),49)
see below 50)
see below 51), 52)?
see below 53), 54)
see below 55)
see below 56)
see below 57)
see below 58), 59)
see below 60)
see below 61), 62)
see below 63),64)
see below 65)
275
276
Chapter 7
mal lam sa labyang chub lam sgron dang/
blo bzang grags pa'i dpalla gnang ba yi/
tshig gi phreng ba dben pa'i gtam brjod dang!
mdo 'khams dbon po bsod nams rgyal mtshan dang/
bka' bcu 'dzin pa kundga' dpal ba lal
slob dpon 'jam dkar thog dra sa pa'i ?/
dge 'dun gzhir bzhugs mams la gnang ba dang/
sgrub pa dpal dang nyi rna seng ge dang/
bde ba can pa slob dpon nam bzang dang!
zul phug bla rna rgyal mgon la sogs pal
'bri khung chen po shes rab dpal ba dang/
mdo 'khams sher 'bummnga' ris dge slong gnyis/
chu 'dus grags rin rgya gar dzo gi dang/
ne rings rin po che'i dbon po lal
me tog mdangs can sgom chen bkra shis bzang/
'od gsal phug sa pa chos skyong rgyal mtshan dang/
ye shes 'od dang sgrub chen dpal mo lal
mnga' ris bdag mo nyi ma'i mtshan can lal
gu ge'i bdag mo chos skyo(ng?) rgyal mo lal
bdag mo tshul khrims bzang mo zhes pa dang/
yar 'brog dpon mo dge slong rna la gdams pal
rdo rje gdan pa dpon mo dge slong mal
gon byo dpon chen pa la gdams pa dang/
twa'i switu chos kyi rin chen dang/
dge sbyong yon tan rgya mtsho sku mched lal
zhang gi mtshan can kun spangs dge sbyong dang/
skyid grong 'phags pa'i drung du dngul skor dang!
dpalldan sa skya'i chos rje'i sku 'dra lal
xx mam phyar phul ba'i bstod phreng dang/
jo nang pa la gnang pa'i tshig phreng dang/
rab byung snon par rzdogs pa'i cho ga'o//
rgyud kyi mthar thug gsang ba 'dus pa yi/
sgrub thabs dkyil chog mchod pa'i phreng ba sogs/
dad Idan gdul bya'i chogs la gdams pa dang/
thar lam bskyed rims? ston pa'i bskor mams soli
OlD-OlD: p. 4b5-4b7
two verses (four lines, nine syllables each)
gang gi legs bshad ( ... ) 'di tsam mol /
see below 66)
see below 67)
see below 68)
see below 69)
see below 70)
see below 71),72)
see below 73)
see below 81)
see below 82), 83)
see below 83),84)
see below 85)
see below 86)
see below 87)
see below 88), 89)
see below 90)
see below 91)
see below 92)
see below 93)
see below 94)
see below 95)
see below 97)
see below 98)
see below 99)
see below 100)
see below 101)
The Writings of Red mda' ba
010-015: pp. 4b7-7a5
29 lines, nine syllables each
thos pa'i Ius stobs ( ... ) gsil zer can! (010-012: pp. 4b7-5a7)
thub bstan gling bzhi'i ( ... ) rgyas gyur cig/ (013-015: pp. 5bl-7a5)
015: 7a: Illustrations left side: Chos rje dByig? pa lana mo
Illustration right side: Chos rje gZhon blo pa la na mo
Last word on p. 7a: subham//
1.2. rJe btsun red mda' pa gzhon nu blo gros kyi gsung thor bu ba, pp.1-335
016: page(s) missing pp. (la-2b missingl
82
017: Praises
277
3a (in Arabic figures: 2(277), in Tibetan: 3a; lable sticked over the left side of the first three
lines)
[mtshan gyi mam grangs dge slong gzhon nu blo gros/ sakya'i dge slong ku rna ra rna til
gsung thor bu 'di la dkar chag chos tshan gcig dang gzhung dngos la chos tshan 72 zhugs/ thengs
'dir bsgrigs skabs kyi chos tshan 73-100 bar gyi mtshan byang mams 'dir mi bzhugs kyang mi
rigs dpe mdzod khang gi dkar chag ltar bsgrigs/ rna dpe dngos Ia Ideb 1-2 (183-4), 140-194
(250-2) bar dang 335 (324) man gyi Ideb rna mams chad ces mtshan yig 'dug
883
]
In detail:
dang pol rje btsun dam pa red mda' pa'i gsung 'bum thor bu ba las yul dam pa mams la bsngags
pa brjod pa'i skabs
884
1) rgyan drug la bstod pa
885
017-018: pp. 3a-3b3
CPN, no. 006117 (5 pp. 1)
bskul ba po khri rgyal bsod nams Ide
Note that on p. 3a bottom on the right it says in Chinese:
Min zu wen hua gong tu shu guan cang
Held by the Library of the Palace of National Minorities
2) chos kyi rje Iotstsha baskyabsmchog dpal bzangpo dang blama'i bka' bzhi pa'i (blo bzang
grags pa) bstod pa
018-018: pp. 3b4-3b7
CPN, no. 006117 (6 pp. 1)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge siong gzhon nu blo gros
bskul ba po slob rna 'ga' yi
3) dpalldan 'dus pa'i dkyil 'khor gyi lha Ia phyag 'tshal ba'i tshigs su bcad pa
019-020: pp. 4al-4b2
278 Chapter 7
CPN, no. 006117 (7 pp. 1)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu bl0 gros
4) 'jam pa'i dbyangs la bstod pa dad pa'i myur gu spel ba zhes bya b,\:fjam dbyangs la bstod
pa)
020-023: pp. 4b2-6al
CPN, no. 006117 (8 pp. 1)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
bskul ba po rang gi slob rna
5) 'phags pa spyan ras gzigs dbang phyug la bstod pa ('jig rten dbang phyug la bstod pa)
023- 025: pp. 6al-7a7
CPN, no. 006117 (9 pp. 1)
mdzad pa po ehos smra ba'i btsun pa gzhon nu blo gros
6) beom Idan 'das sgroI rna la smre sngags kyi sgo nas bstod pa snyan tshig byin rlabs kyi 'dod
'jo zhes bya ba (sgroI rna la bstod pa)
025-027: pp. 7a7-8b3
CPN, no. 006117 (10 pp. 1)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
7) pharol tu phyin pa drug la bsngags pa'i tshigs su bead pa (pharol tu phyin pa drug la bsngags
pa)
028-29: pp. 8b3-9a4
CPN, no. 006117 (11 pp. 1)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
gnyis pal rje btsun dam pa red mda' pa'i gsung 'bum thor bu ba las rang nyid dam pa'i tshul
dang mthun par byas nas gzhan la'ang 'di bzhin 'dams so zhes mam thar mdo tsam ston pa'i
skor
886
8) dge sbyong gi tshulla gdams pa
029-030:pp.9a4-9b6
CPN, no. 006117 (137 6 pp.)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
9) 'gyod med gdeng brod kyi 'gyur ma
887
030-031: pp. 9b6-IOa7
CPN, no. 006117 refers at the end to 004546 (7 pp. 1), i.e. this text with different, elusive
numbering
mdzad sa'i gnas gangs bu le'i mgul
10) rten 'brei gyi de kho na nyid bsdus pa'i rab tu byed pa
031-032: pp. 1 0 a 7 ~ 1 0 b 6
CPN, no. 006117 (12 pp. 1)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
The Writings of Red mda' ba
gsumpa!
11) sems la bskul ba'i tshigs su bead pa
033-033: pp.l1al-llaS
CPN, no. 006117 (not included)
mdzad pa po siikya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
12) 'dod pa'i nyes dmigs la brtsams pa'i tshigs su bead pa
033-034:pp.11aS-l1b3
CPN, no. 006117 (not included)
. mdzad pa po siikya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
13) yi ge'i phyi mo la brtsams pa'i tshigs su bead pa
034-03S: pp. 11b3-12a4
CPN, no. 006117 refers at the end to 004S46 (11 pp. 1)
279
14) 'phen byed kyi-las mam par 'byed pa'i rab byed (las mampar dbye ba'i rab tu byed pa)
03S-036:pp.12aS-12b4
CPN, no. 006117 (not included)
IS) smon lam gyi tshigs bead
036-037:pp.12b4-13a4
CPN, no. 006117 (not included)
16) theg pa ehen po'i gzhi lam 'bras bu gsum gsa! bar byed pa phyag rgya ehen po rdo rje'i glu
(thegpa ehenpo'i blanamedpa'i gzhi lam 'bras bu'i tshullagsa! barbyedpaphyagrgya
ehen po rdo rje'i glu)888
037-41: pp. 13aS-1Sa7
CPN, no. 006117 (not included)
mdzad pa po ehos smra ba'i btsun pa gzhon nu blo gros
17) Ita bsgom spyod 'bras rdo rje'i glu
041-042: pp. 1Sa7-1SbS
CPN, no. 006117 (not included)
mdzad pa po dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
18) Ita bsgom spyod 'bras kyi tshigs su bead pa
042-043: pp.1SbS-16a3
CPN, no. 006117 (not included)
mdzad pa po siikya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
19) tshad ma'i yul dang byed pa brtag pa
889
043-062:pp.16a3-2Sb1
CPN, no. 006117 (14 pp. 1)
mdzad pa po siikya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
280 Chapter 7
20) gzhan sel grub pa'i rab tu byed pa (gzhan sel grub pa zhes bya ba'i rab tu byed pa)
063-105: pp. 26a-47a5 (note: 067 = 28a, 068 = 29a, 069 = 28b or c29b?, one back side
missing, 074 = 32b?, 075 = 33a, 076 = not assigned back side, 077 = 32a, 078 = 32b?, '79
= 34a, 80 = 34b etc.)
ePN, no. 006117 (15 pp. 2, and 16 pp. 17)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong leu rna ra rna til
21) theg pa gsum gyi 'phags pa'i mngon par rtogs pa mam par 'byed pa'i rab tu byed pa (theg
pa gsum gyi 'phags pa'i rtogs pa mam par 'byed pa'i rab tu byed pa)
105-127:pp.47a5-58a5
ePN, no. 006117 (17 pp. 10)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros (in dpal sa skya .... )
22) mam rig grub pa'i rgyan zhes bya ba
890
127-163: pp. 58a5-75b6 (note: 131 = 61a, 132 = 61b, 133 = 60a, 134 = 60b, 147 = 68a,
148 = 69a, 149 = 68b, 150 = 70a, 151 = 70b, 152 = 70a double, 153 = not assigned back
side)
ePN, no; 006117 (18 pp. 14)
mdzad pa po chos srnra ba'i btsun pa gzhon nu blo gros
23) theg pa gsum gyi chen po dbu ma'i lugs kyi gzhi lam 'bras bu gsal bar byed pa (theg pa
chen po dbu ma'i lugs leyi gzhi lam 'bras bu mdor bsdus pa)
163-185:pp.75b6-86b5
ePN, no. 006117 (19 pp. 9)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros (in bu Ie dben gnas)
24) byang chub sems kyi man ngag (byang chub kyi sems gnyis bsgom pa'i man ngag)
185-217: pp. 86b5-102b6 (note: 208: 99a, 209: 99b, 210: 98a, 211: 98b)
ePN, no. 006117 (20 pp. 13)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
25) bdag med gnas lugs kyi don phyin ci rna log par nyams su blang ba'i rim pa
217-231:pp.l02b6-109b2
ePN, no. 006117 (21 pp. 5)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
mdzad sa'i gnas ras sbreng rgyal ba'i dben gnas
26) las dang po pa mams kyi nyams len gyi man ngag mdor bsdus pa
231-291: pp. 109b2-139b7 (note: end missing)
ePN, no. 006117 refers at the end to 004546 (23 pp. 35
891
), i.e. this text with different,
elusive numbering
pp. 140a-194b missing
27) Here a text (beginning missing) ends with the words: shin tu zab pa'i bde bshegs snying
po'i don! gsal bar bshad kyis bzur gnas shes ldan snyon!
The Writings of Red mda' ba
281
CPN, no. 006117 (23 pp. 5: mdo sde mam mang las gsungs pa'i bde gshegs snying po'i
don rgyud bla'i dgongs pa gsal bar bshad pa zhes bya ba bzhugs so )892
28) rgyud bla'i don rags pa t s h ~ g ba'i yig sna
292-302: pp. 195a2-200a3
CPN, no. 006117 (23 pp. 5)
mdzad pa po sa!<ya'i dgeslong gzhon nu blo gros
sbyin bdag 'jam dbyangs nam mkha' rin chen sku mched
mdzad sa'i gnas dpal mnga' ris kyi chos grwa chen po
mdzad pa'i dus g.yas suru byangna bzhugs pa'i sde snod 'dzin pa rags rim bsags pa'i dus
zhu ba po drung bdag po 'jam dbyangs dang sde snod ' dzin pa mams
(mjug tu dpal mnga' ris kyi chos grwa chen por 'jam dbyangs nam mkha' rin chen sku mched
kyi sbyin bdag mdzad nasi g.yas su ru byang na bzhugs pa'i sde snod 'dzin pa rags rim bsags
pa'i dus su drung bdag po 'jam dbyangs dang sde snod 'dzin pa mams kyi rgyud bla'i don rags
pa tshang ba'i yig rigs gcig zhus pa la snang ba'o zhes 'khod)
29) chos mi spong ba'i thabs
302-304 or 306: pp. 200a4-201a7 or 202a5 (note 305: 201b unreadable)
CPN, no. 006117 refers at the end to 004546 (24 pp. 2), i.e. this text with different, elusive
numbering
30) 'phags pa mam par 'thag pa'i bsdus pa'i mdo'i dum bu'i bshad pa
893
306-320: pp. 202a5-209a7 (note: 312 = 204a double, 313 = 205b?, 205a missing)
CPN, no. 006117 (24 pp. 8)
mdzad pa po chos smra ba'i btsun pa gzhon nu b10 gros
bsku! ba po dpal1dan bla rna bkra shis rgyal mtshan dpal bzang po
mdzad sa'i gnas dpa1 sa skya'i gtsug lag khang
321: 209b empty
bzhi pal rje btsun dam pa red mda' pa'i gsung 'bum thor bu ba las/ ston pa dang bstan 'dzin
tshogs la springs pa'i phrin yig gi skor
31) ston pa la phrin du gsol ba sogs phrin yig gi skor (ston pa'i spring yig)
322-324: pp. 21Oal-211a7
CPN, no. 006117 (25 pp. 12)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong [gzhon nu b10 gros]
32) dus kyi 'khor 10'i dpyad pa las brtsams te bstan 'dzin mams la phrin du gsol ba nor bu'i
phreng ba (bstan 'dzin mams la phrin du gsol ba nor bu'i phreng ba zhes bya ba)
324-339: pp.211a7-218b3
CPN, no. 006117 (22? pp. 28 - see two below)
mdzad pa po sa!<ya'i dge slong gzhon nu b10 gros
mdzad sa'i gnas dpal sa skya'i gtsug lag khang
282 Chapter 7
33) dpal dus kyi 'khor lo'i tshig don la 'gal ba spong ba'i dris Ian mdor bsdus pa
339-343: pp. 218b3-220b5 c
CPN,no. 006117 (26pp. 3)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
bsku1 ba po 'jam dbyangs nam mkha' rin chen rgyal mtshan dpal bzang po
mdzad sa'i gnas dpa1 sa skya'i ehos grwa chen po
34) dpal dus kyi 'khor lo'i dris Ian 'phros pa'i Ian tshig don mi 'gal ba spangs pa
(mtshan byang 'di gsar du bkod cing gzhung du: de nyid las 'phros pa'i Ian tshig don mi
'gal ba spang ba zhes 'khod)
343-345: pp. 220b5-221b5
CPN, no. 006117 (22? pp. 28 - together with the two texts above only 20 folios)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
35) bka' bzhi 'dzin pa blo bzang grags pa'i dpa1la spring pa
345-347: pp. 221b5-222b1 (starts with na mo gurave)
CPN, no. 006117 (277 pp. 2)
mdzad pa po srucya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros (kyis rang gi slob rna .... )
36) bka' bzhi 'dzin pa b10 bzang grags pa Ia springs pa
347-349: pp. 222bl-223b1
CPN, no. 006117 (277 pp. 2)
spring sa'i gnas mang yu1 gyi dben gnas gangs zha mo'i mgul nas
mdzad pa'i dus zla ba tshes beu geig
37) bla rna rin po ehe bio bzang grags pa 1a springs pa (bla rna rin po che b10 bzang grags pa
la spring ba)
349-352: pp. 223bl-225a7
CPN, no. 006117 (28 pp. 2)
springs pa'i dus 'brug Io'i zla ba drug pa'i tshes brgyad
894
38) rgyanag gi rgyal po ta'iming can gyis 'ja' sa gos dar sogs gnang ba'i skyes Ian du phul ba
352-358 + 574: pp. 225a7-228b5 (Note 358 = 228a, 228b at the very end = 574)
CPN, no. 006117 (29 pp. 3)
spring sa'i gnas mang yul skyid pa'i grong khyer zhes bya ba I tsan dan 'phags pa rang
byon bzhugs gnas dang nye ba'i dben gnas me tog mdangs can gyi nags khrodnas springs
pa'i dus byi ba 10 zla ba lnga pa'i tshes beo brgyad
lnga pal rje btsun dam pa red mda' pa'i gsung 'bum thor bu ba lasl gzhan gyi the tshom sel byed
dris Ian gyi skor mams bstan pa'i skabs
39) bla rna bka' bzhi pa nam mkha' 'od zer gyi gsung gis dris pa'i Ian
359-412: pp. 228b5-255a7 (Note: 228 at the very end = 574; 412 = 255b: empty)
CPN, no. 006117 (not included)
The Writings of Red mda' ba
283
rndzad pa po siikya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
rndzad sa'i gnas dpal sa skya'i chos grwa chen po
40)
10 tsa ba donbzang gi dris Ian
413-422: pp. 256al-260b3
rndzad pa po gzhon nu blo gros
ePN, no. 006117 (31 pp. 5)
41)
rtse chen mkhan po'i dris Ian
422-434: pp. 260b3-266b3
ePN, no. 006117 (32 pp. 4)
rndzad pa po siikya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
42)
dge bshes shes rab grags kyi dris Ian
434-466: pp. 266b3-282b5
ePN, no. 006117 (33 pp. 14)
rndzad pa po gzhon nu blo gros
rndzad sa'i gnasdben gnas sa bzangs
43) skyor rno lung pa siikya seng ge'i dris Ian
466-471: pp. 282b5-285a7
ePN, no. 006117 (34 pp. 3)
rndzad pa po dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
44) bo dong mkhan po chos rgyal gyi dris Ian
472-473: pp. 285bl-286a2
ePN, no. 006117 (35 pp. 2)
rndzad pa po dge slong ku rna ra rna ti
45) chos rgyal gyi zhus Ian
473-477: pp. 286a2-288a6
ePN, no. 006117 (36 pp. 2)
46) bla rna 'od zer rgyal rntshan gyi zhus Ian
477-489:pp.288a7-294a4
ePN, no. 006117 (37 pp. 5)
rndzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
yi ge pa ha ri bha dra
47) bla rna bsgrub pa dpal gyi zhus Ian
489-495: pp. 294a4-297al
ePN, no. 006117 (38 pp. 2)
48) bla rna sgrub pa dpal gyis zhus pa'i rni shigs pa'i thig le'i ngos 'dzin don gsum gyis bstan
pa
284 Chapter 7
495-507: pp. 297al-302bl (505: 302a, 506: 304a, 507: 302b)
CPN, no. 006117 (39 pp. 5)
49) blarna sgrub pa dpal bas gsang ba ' dus pa'i sgrub thabs rndor byas dang sgrub thabs mam
bzhag ti ka mam gnyis kyi mi 'dra ba'i khyad par zhus pa'i Ian
895
507-517: pp. 302bl-307b1 (510: 304a double)
CPN, no. 006117 (40 pp. 4)
rndzad pa po rje btsun dam pa ku rna ra rna ti
50) sngags 'ehang kun dga' zia ba'i zhus Ian
517-529: pp. 307bl-313b2
CPN, no. 006117 (41 pp. 6)
rndzad pa po sakya'i dge siong gzhon nu blo gros
yi ge pa sgrub pa dpal rno
51) bka' bzhi pa don rin dang dge bshes kun dga' gnyis kyi zhus Ian
529-530: pp. 313b2-314a6
CPN, no. 006117 (42 pp. 1)
rndzad pa po dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
.52) bka' bzhi pa don rin dang dge bshes kun dga' gnyis kyis zhus pa'i Ian
530-531: pp. 314a6-314b7
CPN, no. 006117 (43 pp. 1)
53) dge bshes sang blo'i zhus Ian
532-532: pp. 315al-315a5
CPN, no. 006117 (44 pp. 1)
54) rnang yul skyid grong dbon po bsod nams don grub kyi zhus Ian (skyid grong dbon po'i
zhus Ian)
532-534:pp.315a6-316a1
CPN, no. 006117 (45 pp. 1)
rndzad yul gung thang rdzong mkhar
55) bka' beu pa bde legs dpal gyi zhus Ian (dpon po bde legs dpal bas zhus pa Ia gnang ba)
534-535: pp. 316al-316b5
CPN, no. 006117 (46 pp. 2)
56) stag rtse dpon po dge sbyong bde legs dpal bas zhus Ian
535-540: pp. 316b5-319a3
CPN, no. 006117 (not included)
rndzad pa po rje btsun dam pa ku rna ra rna ti
57) bka' beu pa yon tan rgyal rntshan gyi zhus Ian
540-542: pp. 319a3-320a7
CPN, no, 006117 (47 pp. 1)
The Writings of Red mda' ba
285
58)
dge bshes rnchog bzang gi zhus Ian
543-543: pp. 320bl-320b5
ePN, no. 006117 (48 pp. 1)
59) mi nyag rin chen dpal gyi zhus Ian
543-544:pp.320b5-32la5
ePN, no. 006117 (49 pp. 1)
60) chu 'dus pa thugs rje rin chen zhus Ian
544-545:pp.32laS-32lb3
ePN, no. 006117 (50 pp. 1)
61) dge bshes seng ge rgyal rntshan gyi zhus Ian
545-549: pp. 321b4-323b2
ePN, no. 006117 (51 pp. 1)
62) dge bshes grags rin gyi zhus Ian
549-549: pp. 323b2-323b5
ePN, no. 006117 (52 pp. 1)
63) dge bshes brtson 'grus dpal gyi zhus Ian
549-550: pp. 323b3-324a2
ePN, no. 006117 (53 pp. 1)
64) slob dpon grags rgyal gyi zhus Ian
550-551:pp.324a2-324b2
ePN, no. 006117 (53 pp. 1)
drugpa/
65) chos rje grags rgyal ba la phul ba'i gdams pa (mkhan chen rin po che grags pa rgyal
rntshan)
551-552: pp. 324b2-325a4
ePN, no. 006117 (54 pp. 1)
rndzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
66) bla rna rmi lam pa brtson 'grus seng ge la gdams pa byang chub lam gyi sgron rna
552-557: pp. 325a5-327b5
ePN, no. 006117 (55 pp. 2)
rndzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
67) chos rje blo bzang grags pa la gdams pa dben par dga' ba'i gtam
557-569: pp. 327b5-333b3
ePN, no. 006117 (56 pp. 5)
68) dbon po bsod nams rgyal rntshan la gdams pa
569-571: pp. 333b3-334b5
286 Chapter 7
CPN,no. 006117 (58
896
pp.l)
mdzad pa po sakya'i dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
mdzad sa'i gnas gangs dkar po bu le'i gnas
69) gnas mying pa slob dpon bka' bcu pa kun dga' dpalla gdams pa
571-571: pp. 334b5-334b7
CPN, no. 006117 (59 pp. 1)
70) chos rje blo bzang grags pa'i phyag phyi ba 'jam dbyangs dkar pos gtso mdzad
gnyug mar gnas pa mams la gdams pa
572-572: pp. 335al-335a2
CPN, no. 006117 (60 pp. 1)
mdzad pa po dge slong gzhon nu blo gros
71) bla rna sgrub pa dpalla gdams pa
572-572: pp. 335a2-335a6
CPN, no. 006117 (61 pp. 1)
72) bo dong pa slob dpon nyi rna seng ge la gdams pa
572-? (573 empty): pp. 335a6-335b (note: from 335b onwards all missing)
CPN, no. 006117 (62 pp. 1)
73) bde ba can pa slob dpon nam bzang la gdams pa
pp.335b-?
CPN, no. 006117 (63 pp. 1)
74) Ita khrid rgyud pa'i gsol debs
897
pp. 12 - CPN, no. 006117 (2)
75) gsang 'dus rim Inga rgyud pa'i gsol 'debs
898
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (3)
76) bcom Idan 'das de bzhin gshegs pa dgra bcom pa yang dag par rdzogs pa'i sangs rgyas la
bstod pa
899
pp. 3 - CPN, no. 006117 (4)
77) chos kyi rje sa skya paJ).gi ta la bstod pa tshad ma'i mam bshad du byung ba
pp. 1- CPN, no. 006117 (6 pp. I)
78) mdog lod mkhan chen kun dga' dpalla bstod pa gsang ba
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (7)
79) mam par thar pa rje nyid kyi gsung las byung ba
pp. 6 - CPN, no. 006117 (13)
80) dpal dus kyi 'khor lo'i nges don gsal bar byed pa'i rin po che'i sgron rna zhes bya ba-
CPN, no. 006117 (22 pp. 28)900
The Writings of Red mda' ba
81) 'bri gung gi chen po shes rab dpalla gdams pa
pp. 1- CPN, no. 006117 (64 pp. 1)
82) rndo khams pa shes rab 'bum la gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (65 pp. 1)
83) mnga' ris dge bshes? gnyis dang ehu 'dus pa grags pa rin chen beas 1a gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (66 pp. 1)
84) rgya gar nub phyogs kyi 'dzo ki la gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (67 pp. 1)
85) zang zang ne'u rings pa'i dpon po slob dpon bde legs rngon po la gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (68 pp. 1)
86) mnga' ris pa sgorn chen bkra shis bzang po la gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (69 pp. 1)
87) mnga' ris pa 'od gsal phug pa la gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (70 pp. 1)
88) mnga' ris pa dpon sgorn ye shes 'od la gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (71 pp. 1)
89) las stod byang pa sgrub chen rna dpa' rno la gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (72 pp. 1)
90) mnga' ris slob dpon rna nyi rna 1a gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (73 pp. 1)
91) gu ge'i Iha geig ehos skyong rgyal rno la gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (74 pp. 1)
92) yurn me ba tshul khrirns bzang rno la gdams pa
pp. 1-CPN, no. 006117 (75 pp. 1)
93) yar 'brog gi dpon rno dge slong rna la gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (76 pp. 1)
94) rdo rje gdan pa'i dpon rno slob dpon rna la gdams pa
pp. 3 - CPN, no. 006117 (77 pp. 3)
95) go 'jo dpon chen gyi pbrin yig gi Ian du gdams pa
pp. 3 - CPN, no. 006117 (78 pp. 3)
96) mnga' ris pa mnga' bdag khri rgyal bsod nams Ide 1a gdams pa
pp. 3 - CPN, no. 006117 (79 pp. 3)
287
288 Chapter 7
97) ta'i si tu chos kyi rin chenla gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (80 pp. 1)
98) gnam sa'i dpon po yon tan rgya mtsho sku mched gsum Ia gdams pa
pp. 1- CPN, no. 006117 (81 pp. 1)
99) rnnga' ris blo bo ba kun spangs pa Ia gdams pa
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (82 pp. 1)
100) skyid grong 'phags pa rang byon gyi drung du dngul gyi kong bu gtsugs dus sbyar ba
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (83 pp. 1)
101) sgo rum du chos rje sa skya P3l).t;li ta'i skur Ider Ia na bza' phul dus sbyar ba
pp. 1 - CPN, no. 006117 (84 pp. 1)
102) ston pa Ia phrin du gsol ba sogs phrin yig gi skor (ston pa'i spring yig)901
322-324: pp. 210al-211a7
CPN, no. 006117 (25 pp. 12)
mdzad pa po siikya'i dge siong [gzhon nu blo gros]
Tabular Curriculum Vitae of Red mda' ba
The following tabular presentation of Red mda' ba's life utilized not only information gleaned
from his biography, but also from supplementary texts such as the biographies ofrJe Tsong kha
pa, rGyal tshab rje and mKhas sgrub rje. This representation of his life may change in the future,
if and when new sources become available and studied.
Personal Datas / Date Events
Primary and Personal Red mda' ba gZhon nu blo gros
Name gZhon nu blo gros (Skt. Kumaramati) is the monastic name he
received in 1365 (see below). A part of the name agrees with
the primary and personal name of his preceptor.
Other Names 1) bTsun ne Blo gros che (Maharnati): "nickname
"
as child
2) IGsmm Pal}.Qita Amoghavajra: name in his former life
3) Mi skyod rdo rje secret tantric name
Forms of Address 1) Chos rje Rin po che: this address could also refer to any
other bla rna, depending on the context
2) rJe btsun Red mda' ba
3) dPalldan Red mda' ba
4) mKhas grub chen po gZhon nu blo gros
5) Gangs can gyi shing rta chen po gZhon nu blo gros
6) Bla rna gZhon nu blo gros
7) dPalldan bla rna dam pa Kumaramati
8) gZhon blo (ba)
Name of Father bKra shis rGyal mtshan, minister of Red mda' (local head or
head of an aristrocratic family or clan, perhaps responsible for
the protection and management of a fortress or customs
house)
Name of Mother Lo dBang phyug skyid
Name of Aunt bKra shis 'bum
1348 Birth in Red mda' in gTsang, a small settlement near Sa skya
earth-male-mouse-year (sa monastery, in the west of Sa skya border, named after the
po byi 10) prominent family Red mda'
290 Chapter 8
Personal Datas / Date Events
About 1352-55 Parents "pass away
"
At childhood, up to 1360 Receives refuge, generation ofbodhicitta, vow of 'one day
fasting' (bsnyen gnas, upavasa) as well as many dharma
teachings on Mahakanu;ta from 'Phags chen Chos bzang dpa1
(b. 13th cent.)
1365 Receives vow of a sramal).era (dg