Sie sind auf Seite 1von 16

Coffee Break German

Lesson 10
Study Notes

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 1 of 16


LESSON NOTES

ES HAT MICH SEHR GEFREUT


In this tenth lesson of the Coffee Break German series you will put
much of the language you have learned into practice by listening to a
conversation. This conversation will also introduce some new words
and phrases.

INTRODUCTION
This lesson begins with the following conversation. Mark explains
that he is müde, tired.

Mark: Herzlich Willkommen zu Coffee Break German. Ich


heiße Mark.
Thomas: Mein Name ist Thomas.

Mark: Wie geht’s heute, Thomas?


Thomas: Sehr gut. Wie geht’s dir?
Mark: Ich bin müde. Heute bin ich müde.

ich bin müde


I am tired

heute bin ich müde


today I am tired

Note that in the sentence heute bin ich müde, the verb is in the
second position.

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 2 of 16


REVIEW
In the review section, Thomas gave Mark three sentences to translate
into German. These are listed here with further explanations where
necessary.

Ich verstehe ein bisschen Deutsch, aber ich spreche


kein Deutsch.
I understand a little German, but I don’t speak any German

As we learned in the last lesson, “I don’t speak any German” or “I


don’t speak German” is translated using the word kein.

Sie verstehen ein bisschen Spanisch, und Sie


verstehen auch ein bisschen Französisch.
You (formal) understand a little Spanish, and you also understand a
little French.

Note that auch has to follow Sie verstehen in this sentence:


whereas in English we say “you also understand a little French”, in
German the word for “also” has to come after the verb in this
situation: Sie verstehen auch ein bisschen Französisch.

Du verstehst ein bisschen Japanisch, aber du


sprichst kein Spanisch.
You (informal) understand a little Japanese, but you don’t speak
any Spanish.

Note the du form of the verb verstehen: du verstehst. We have


already learned ich verstehe and Sie verstehen. You can see that
verstehen follows the patterns of kommen which we learned in the
last lesson.

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 3 of 16


A CONVERSATION
The main content of this lesson focused on a conversation between
“Friedrich”, a native German speaker, and “Michael”, an American
living in Germany. The full text of the conversation is provided below.
Notes are provided after the conversation.

Friedrich: Hallo. Ich heiße Friedrich.


Michael: Es freut mich. Ich heiße Michael. Ich komme aus den
U.S.A. Kommen Sie aus Deutschland?
Friedrich: Ja und nein. Ich wohne hier in Deutschland, aber ich
komme aus Österreich. Ich bin in Salzburg geboren.
Michael: Ah, Salzburg ist sehr schön!
Friedrich: Sind Sie zum ersten Mal in hier?
Michael: Ersten Mal? Ich verstehe nicht.
Friedrich: Ersten Mal. Auf Englisch “the first time”.
Michael: Also ja, jetzt wohne ich hier in München, aber ich
komme aus den U.S.A.
Friedrich: Wohnen Sie alleine, oder sind Sie hier mit Ihrer
Familie?
Michael: Entschuldigung. Ich verstehe nicht.
Friedrich: Ist Ihre Familie auch hier in München?
Michael: Ach so. Ja, meine Frau und mien Sohn sind auch
hier.
Friedrich: Ah, schön! Wie heißt Ihre Frau?
Michael: Sie heißt Carol.
Friedrich: Sie sprechen perfektes Deutsch!
Michael: Nein! Ich spreche nur ein bisschen Deutsch.
Friedrich: Ah. Leider spreche ich kein Englisch. Ich verstehe ein
bisschen Englisch, aber das Sprechen ist schwer. Ich
wünschte, mein Englisch wäre so gut wie Ihr
Deutsch!

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 4 of 16


Michael: Danke. Sprechen Sie Französisch?
Friedrich: Ja. Ich spreche Französisch, und auch ein bisschen
Italienisch. Wie viele Sprachen sprechen Sie?
Michael: Um... noch einmal. Ein bisschen langsamer.
Friedrich: Wie viele Sprachen sprechen Sie? Zum beispiel: Sie
sprechen Deutsch und Englisch, aber sprechen Sie
Französisch? Sprechen Sie vielleicht Chinesisch?
Michael: Ah! Ich spreche auch Französisch und ein bisschen
Spanisch. Ich spreche vier Sprachen.
Friedrich: Ausgezeichnet. Es hat mich sehr gefreut. Ich muss
leider gehen. Ober! Die Rechnung, bitte.
Michael: Danke, es hat mich auch gefreut. Bis zum nächsten
Mal.
Friedrich: Viel Glück hier in Deutschland! Auf Wiedersehen.

The notes below should help you understand the conversation fully.

ich bin in Salzburg geboren


I was born in Salzburg

You can replace Salzburg with any town or country in this phrase to
say where you were born.

Salzburg ist sehr schön


Salzburg is very beautiful

sind Sie zum ersten Mal hier?


are you here for the first time?

We have already come across the word Mal in the phrase bis zum
nächsten Mal, meaning “until the next time”. To answer the
question you could say ich bin zum ersten Mal hier, “I am here

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 5 of 16


for the first time”, or “it’s the first time I’ve been here”.

auf Englisch
in English

wohnen Sie alleine


are you living alone? are you living on your own?

sind Sie hier mit Ihrer Familie?


are you here with your family?

ist Ihre Familie auch in München?


is your family also in Munich?

You will have noticed two different words used in the sentences above
to translate the English word “your”: Ihre Familie and (mit) Ihrer
Familie. Don’t worry too much about this just now: you will
probably have guessed already that this has something to do with
cases and we will learn why Ihre changes to Ihrer after mit in
future lessons.

meine Frau und mein Sohn sind auch hier


my wife and my son are also here

ach schön!
oh how nice!

wie heißt Ihre Frau?


what is your wife called?

Sie sprechen perfektes Deutsch


you speak perfect German

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 6 of 16


Note that you can replace Deutsch with any other language in this
sentence, so you could compliment a German speaker with good
English by saying Sie sprechen perfektes Englisch!

ich spreche nur ein bisschen Deutsch


I only speak a little German

leider spreche ich kein Englisch


unfortunately I don’t speak any English

The word leider means “unfortunately”. Note in this example that


leider starts the sentence, meaning that it is followed immediately
by the verb in second position.

das Sprechen ist schwer


speaking it is difficult. Literally “the speech is difficult”.

ich wünschte, mein Englisch wäre so gut wie Ihr


Deutsch
I wish my English were as good as your German

The grammar behind this phrase is complex. For the time being,
learn the phrase as an expression which is sure to impress and please
any native speakers you speak with.

wie viele Sprachen sprechen Sie?


how many languages do you speak?

zum Beispiel
for example

vielleicht
perhaps

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 7 of 16


es hat mich sehr gefreut
it has been a pleasure, I’ve enjoyed meeting you

ich muss leider gehen


unfortunately I must go, I have to go

Ober!
waiter!

die Rechnung, bitte


the bill, please

es hat mich auch gefreut


I’ve also enjoyed meeting you

viel Glück hier in Deutschland


good luck here in Germany

SOME USEFUL PHRASES


Following on from viel Glück, Thomas introduced some other
greetings and useful phrases for different times in the year and
different situations:

alles gute zum Geburtstag


happy birthday

This literally means something like “all the best on your birthday”.

frohe Weihnachten
happy Christmas

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 8 of 16


gutes neues / frohes neues
happy New Year

Although the word Jahr is not included in these phrases, it is


understood. You can alternatively say gutes neues Jahr, literally
“good new year”.

Another phrase which may come in useful is:

ich liebe dich


I love you

Note that this is informal, using the word dich for “you”. It is
assumed by this stage in a relationship you’re using the du form with
the person you love!

CULTURAL CORRESPONDENT
As this lesson is being published for the first time around Easter,
Julia takes the opportunity to tell us about Easter traditions in
German-speaking areas in this lesson’s Cultural Correspondent
section.

Hallo Mark, grüß Gott, Thomas, und moin


moin an alle unsere Coffee Break German
Zuhörer. Ich bin’s, Julia, eure
Kulturreporterin, and today I will tell you
about the German way of celebrating Easter.

Just as in many other countries, people eat


and give each other colourful Easter eggs on
Easter Sunday. You can buy them already
painted, but many families paint the eggs themselves, together.

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 9 of 16


This tradition is especially enjoyed by children, and of course what
they love even more is Eier suchen on Easter Sunday, which
means searching for the eggs and other little presents that their
parents hide for them. Did I just say “parents”? Well, of course the
Oster Hase, the Easter Bunny, is the one hiding the eggs here,
mostly in the garden or the park, or if there is the typical weather
at this time of year with a mix of rain, sun, hail and even snow
sometimes, the Easter presents might also be found behind the
couch or in the lampshade.

On Easter Sunday, then, as soon as you’ve found the eggs, there is


this funny tradition of Eier rollen, rolling eggs down hill. The
rules for this game might differ from region to region, but it is
mostly the egg rolling the furthest that wins.

Next to looking for little gifts, there are some other traditions as
well. Obviously Easter is the most important Christian holiday,
which means that many people throughout Germany, Switzerland
and Austria attend Mass on Easter Sunday. The night before, on
Saturday, it is common to light the so-called Osterfeuer, Easter
fires, which are bonfires traditionally lit to drive away evil spirits.

Of course the aren’t any traditional celebrations without typical,


traditional food. It’s very common to only eat fish on Good Friday,
Karfreitag auf Deutsch, and on Sunday the traditional dish is
lamb roast, as well as Easter bread, which is more like a cake than
bread. It’s baked with yeast, nuts and raisins.

The Easter weekend is a long one for German and Swiss people, as
they have both Karfreitag, Good Friday, and Ostermontag,
Easter Monday, off work, whereas Austrians only have Easter
Monday off.

As usual I hope you’ve enjoyed this little insight into some


traditions that we celebrate here in German-speaking parts of the
world.

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 10 of 16


GRAMMAR GURU

We certainly have covered lots in these first


ten lessons of Coffee Break German. In this
Grammar Guru section, I’m going to review
some of the aspects of German grammar that
we’ve already covered.
One of the first things that we learned about
German is that all nouns, whether they’re
animate nouns like people, or inanimate like objects, have
grammatical gender, which is indicated by its article. We learned
the three definite articles: der for masculine nouns, die for
feminine and das for neuter nouns.

MASCULINE FEMININE NEUTER

NOMINATIVE der die das

ACCUSATIVE den die das

We also learned how to talk about definite articles in terms of


their case and can say that definite articles der, die and das are
the nominative case forms, the ones you would find in the
dictionary, and used when the noun is the subject of the sentence.
Then we learned about the changes that take place if the noun
becomes the object of the sentence, or if it comes after a
preposition like über. This puts them into the accusative case and
this means that der changes to den, but the other two stays the
same.
We also talked about adjectives in German change their endings to
fit the gender of the noun they’re describing. Remember guten
Morgen, guten Abend but gute Nacht? And don’t forget that

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 11 of 16


when you’re writing in German, all nouns always start with a
capital letter.
Moving on from nouns, we also talked about verbs. Firstly, we
learned that in a simple sentence the verb always comes in second
position. But remember, it’s not always the second word. We
learned ich komme aus Deutschland aber jetzt wohne ich
in Österreich.

2ND POSITION

Ich komme aus Deutschland.

Jetzt wohne ich in Österreich.

Then we learned that after a modal verb like können, the main
verb goes to the end of the sentence, as in können Sie mir bitte
die Rechnung bringen?
In our last lesson we learned the conjugation patterns for the
singular forms of verbs. We took the -en off the infinitive and
replaced it with the singular verb endings: -e for ich, -st for du, -
en for Sie and -t for er, sie and es. This is shown the table below:

ENDINGS PLURAL

ICH -e ich komme

DU -st du kommst

SIE -en Sie kommen

er/sie/es
ER/SIE/ES -t
kommt

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 12 of 16


Remember du and Sie are two of the different ways to say “you”:
du is for someone you know, and Sie is for someone you don’t.
We really have covered a lot! Don’t worry if you haven’t fully
grasped some of those grammar points quite yet: the more you use
them, the easier it will become, and eventually it will all become
automatic!
Well done for getting this far in the course and I’m looking
forward to joining you in future lessons!

DAS REICHT FÜR HEUTE

Ready for more? Turn the page to continue with the


bonus materials for this lesson.

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 13 of 16


CORE VOCABULARY
ich bin in ... geboren
I was born in ...

Salzburg ist sehr schön


Salzburg is very beautiful

sind Sie zum ersten Mal hier?


are you here for the first time?

auf Englisch
in English

wohnen Sie alleine


are you living alone? are you living on your own?

sind Sie hier mit Ihrer Familie?


are you here with your family?

ist Ihre Familie auch in München?


is your family also in Munich?

meine Frau und mein Sohn sind auch hier


my wife and my son are also here

ach schön!
oh how nice!

wie heißt Ihre Frau?


what is your wife called?

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 14 of 16


Sie sprechen perfektes Deutsch
you speak perfect German

ich spreche nur ein bisschen Deutsch


I only speak a little German

leider spreche ich kein Englisch


unfortunately I don’t speak any English

das Sprechen ist schwer


speaking it is difficult. Literally “the speech is difficult”.

ich wünschte, mein Englisch wäre so gut wie Ihr


Deutsch
I wish my English were as good as your German

wie viele Sprachen sprechen Sie?


how many languages do you speak?

zum Beispiel
for example

vielleicht
perhaps

es hat mich sehr gefreut


it has been a pleasure, I’ve enjoyed meeting you

ich muss leider gehen


unfortunately I must go, I have to go

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 15 of 16


Ober!
waiter!

die Rechnung, bitte


the bill, please

es hat mich auch gefreut


I’ve also enjoyed meeting you

viel Glück hier in Deutschland


good luck here in Germany

alles gute zum Geburtstag


happy birthday

frohe Weihnachten
happy Christmas

gutes neues / frohes neues


happy New Year

ich liebe dich


I love you

Coffee Break German: Lesson 10 - Notes page 16 of 16