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Date: 09.10.2009 Date: 09.10.

2009
DIN V 5031-100 DIN V 5031-100
CEN/TC 169
N 0788
English version
of DIN V 5031-100
published 2009-06
Optical radiation physics and illuminating engineering Part 100: Non-visual effects
of ocular light on human beings Quantities, symbols and action spectra
Optical radiation physics and illuminating engineering Part 100: Non-visual effects
of ocular light on human beings Quantities, symbols and action spectra
Strahlungsphysik im optischen Bereich und Lichttechnik Teil 100: ber das Auge vermittelte, nichtvisuelle
Wirkung des Lichts auf den Menschen Gren, Formelzeichen und Wirkungsspektren
Strahlungsphysik im optischen Bereich und Lichttechnik Teil 100: ber das Auge vermittelte, nichtvisuelle
Wirkung des Lichts auf den Menschen Gren, Formelzeichen und Wirkungsspektren
Physique de radiation optique et technique d'clairage Partie 100: Effet non-visuel de lumire oculaire sur la
personne grandeurs, symboles et spctre dactivit
Physique de radiation optique et technique d'clairage Partie 100: Effet non-visuel de lumire oculaire sur la
personne grandeurs, symboles et spctre dactivit




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Version 2.2 Version 2.2
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
Contents Page
Foreword......................................................................................................................................................... 3
Introduction.................................................................................................................................................... 3
1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................. 3
2 Normative references ....................................................................................................................... 4
3 Terms and Definitions ...................................................................................................................... 4
4 Biological effects of light ................................................................................................................. 7
4.1 General............................................................................................................................................... 7
4.2 Nocturnal melatonin suppression................................................................................................... 8
4.3 Shifting of circadian phase............................................................................................................ 11
4.4 Change in circadian amplitude...................................................................................................... 11
4.5 Activation by light........................................................................................................................... 11
4.6 Treatment of seasonal affective disorders (SAD) ....................................................................... 11
Annex A (informative) Spectral energy distribution of modern light sources ..................................... 13
Bibliography................................................................................................................................................. 16

2
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
Foreword
This prestandard was prepared by NA 058-00-27 AA Effect of Light on Human Beings within the Lighting
Technology Standards Committee (FNL) of the German Institute for Standardization DIN.
A prestandard is the result of a standardization work, which is not published as a DIN standard because of
contents related reluctance or a deviant process of creation.
No draft preceding this prestandard was published.
Comments on experience with this prestandard are welcomed
best as an electronic file per e-mail addressed to fnl@din.de in chart form. A sample chart is ready for
download at DIN: http://www.din.de/stellungnahme
or as a paper work addressed to NA 058-00-27 AA.
Introduction
With the proof of melanopsin in ganglion cells of the human retina and their given sensitivity mainly in the blue
part of the spectrum it is clear that a description of optical radiation according solely to the photometric action
spectrum of DIN 5031-3 is not sufficient.
Depending on time of stimulation, narrow band light in the short wavelength region causes suppression of the
nocturnal release of melatonin, increases heart rate as well as alertness and affects thermoregulation,
electroencephalogram spectrum and the phase of the circadian system. Fast responses in the range of seconds
to short wavelength light were seen in the papillary reflex or in brain activity patterns.
For these non-visual effects of light perceived by the eyes, the term biological effects is also used in this
prestandard.
As the available data base is partly unconfirmed, action spectra presented herein have to be updated according
to new scientific evidence.
The importance of biological effects of light on humans justifies also in this early stage of evidence to compile a
prestandard in order to have a uniform evaluation procedure.
1 Scope
This prestandard specifies the spectral quantification of visible optical radiation with respect to biological effects
of light. Additionally, terms and action spectra characterizing light biologically are defined.
The prestandard establishes a uniform evaluation of light sources and lighting, not implying necessarily that the
action spectra provide a precise measure for the biological effectiveness of the optical radiation.
3
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
2 Normative references
The following referenced documents are indispensable for the application of this document. For dated
references, only the edition cited applies. For undated references, the latest edition of the referenced document
(including any amendments) applies.
DIN 5031-3, Optical radiation physics and illuminating engineering edition cited applies Part 3: quantities,
symbols and units of illuminating engineering
DIN 5033-7, Colorimetry; Part 7: measuring conditions for object colours
CIE Report 15, Colorimetry, 3
rd
Edition
3 Terms and Definitions
For the purposes of this document, the terms and definitions given in DIN 5031-3 and the following apply.
3.1
Biological Effects of Light
effects on human physiology and behaviour by light received through the eyes besides the visual perception
3.2
Biological Rating
X
biol

size of the biological effect of optical radiation according to equation (1)
( ) ( )


d s X X =

2
1
biol biol
(1)
Where
X
biol
is the biologically effective radiant quantity;
X

() is the spectral radiant quantity;


s
biol
() is the relative spectral sensitivity of a biological process, with respect to maximum s
biol,max
() = 1 (action
spectrum);

1
,
2
are the limit wave lengths for sensitivity according to chart 2.
NOTE 1 Equation (1) presumes that the total effect is the sum of single wavelength (monochromatic radiation) effects,
also called the law of Abney. Scientific research suggests that this can be assumed at least in a first approximation.
NOTE 2 Equation (1) is valid for persons at the age of 25 years; correction factors for other person ages are given in 3.4.
NOTE 3 Biological effects typically show a non-linear correlation to biological effective radiation.
3.3
Biological Action Factor
a
biol v
ratio of biological rating to photometric rating of photopic vision according to equation (2)
4
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
( )
( )



=
nm 780
nm 380
biol
v biol
) (
) (
2
1


d V X
d s X
a (2)
Where
a
biol v
is the biological action factor;
V() is the spectral luminous efficiency function V() for photopic vision according to DIN 5031-3;

1
,
2
are the limit wave lengths for sensitivity according to chart 2.
NOTE 1 The biological action factor is a dimensionless quantity.
NOTE 2 for a known photometric value Xv (e. g. luminance) for photopic vision, the biological action factor can be used to
calculate the biological rating Xbiol by using equation (3).
Xbiol = Km
-1
Xv abiol v (3)
Where
Xv is the photometric quantity according to DIN 5031-3
Km = 683 lm/W is the maximum spectral luminous efficacy according to DIN 5031-3
NOTE 3 To enable a proper comparison, action factors should be given with 3 significant decimal places.
3.4
Correction factor for person age regarding biological effects of light
k
biol
(A)
ratio of biological effect of light for a person at age (A) to the one for a person at the age of 25 years according to
equation (4).
( ) ( ) ( ) A kp A k A k
pupil trans biol biol
= (4)
Where
k
biol trans
(A) is the age (A) dependent correction factor for the transmittance of ocular media according to 3.4.1.
k
pupil
(A) is the age (A) dependent correction factor for the reduction of pupil size according to 3.4.2
NOTE 1 The age dependent correction factor is a dimensionless quantity.
NOTE 2 for a known photometric value Xv for photopic vision, the age dependent biological effect of light Xbiol A can be
calculated by using equation (5).
Xbiol A = Km
-1
Xv abiol v kbiol(A) (5)
Where
Km = 683 lm/W is the maximum spectral luminous efficacy according to DIN 5031-3
5
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
NOTE 3 The age dependent correction factor incorporates only the transmittance of ocular media and the changes in
pupil size with person age but not possible age dependent changes in physiological processes which are subject to biological
effects of light.
3.4.1
Correction factor for age dependent transmittance of ocular media
k
biol trans
(A)
ratio that relates the spectrally for biological effects weighted transmitted light fraction passing the ocular media
of a person at age (A) to the one of a person at the age of 25 years according to equation (6).
( )
( )
( )
( )
( )

=
2
1
2
1

biol

biol
trans biol
) (
) (
25 ,
,

d s X
d s
A
A
X
A k


(6)
Where
(, A) is the spectral degree of transmittance of ocular media at person age A (see Note 2).
NOTE 1 Equation (6) implies, that the relative spectral sensitivity of biological process sbiol() was determined for 25 year
old persons.
NOTE 2 According to [9], the spectral degree of transmittance (, A) of ocular media at person age A can be determined
by using equations (7a) and (7b).
( )
( ) ( ) A D
A
,
10 ,



= (7a)
Where optical density D(, A) =
( ) ( )
( ) ( )
( ) ( ) (
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
2 2
2 2
2 2
2
4 2
00018876 , 0 02288 , 0 325 000064 , 0 exp
00222270 , 0 70505 , 0 325 000441 , 0 exp
00013419 , 0 12574 , 2 370 0,000841 exp
5492 , 151 273 003249 , 0 exp
/ 400 000031 , 0 225 , 0 111 . 0
A
A
A
A
+ +
+ + +
+ +
+ +
+ + + =


)
(7b)
Table 1 Optical density D() and optical transmittance () for person ages 25, 50 und 75 years
dependent on wavelength
Wavelength Optical
density
Optical
transmittance
Optical
density
Optical
transmittance
Optical
density
Optical
transmittance
[nm] D(, 25) (, 25) D(, 50) (, 50) D(, 75) (, 75)
400 1,58679429 0,02589439 2,12259831 0,00754053 3,01560503 0,00096471
450 0,32689622 0,47108989 0,49646809 0,31880998 0,77908788 0,16630761
500 0,23094084 0,58756939 0,30460767 0,49589797 0,42738572 0,37377847
550 0,18488335 0,65330601 0,21500561 0,60952902 0,26520939 0,54298847
650 0,14620968 0,71415145 0,1549558 0,69991323 0,16953267 0,67681088
700 0,13707319 0,72933458 0,14331429 0,71892852 0,15371611 0,70191397
750 0,13077339 0,73999129 0,13547958 0,73201573 0,14332324 0,71891371
6
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03

3.4.2
ction factor for age dependent size of pupil
person at the age of 25 years according to equation (8).
Where
59 (see note).
he experiments cited in [10].
Table 2 Correction factors for age dependent size of pupil according to equation (8)
Corre
K (A
pupil
)
ratio of pupil area for a person at age A to the one of a
( ) ( ) [ ]
2
25 c 1 = A A k (8)
pupil
c = 0,005
Basis for equation (8) are t
A = 25 A=50 A=75
k
pupil
(A) 1 0,740 0,519

OTE In fact, the factor c in equation (8) is dependent on the adapted luminance L. In typical use cases the luminance
adapted to is unknown. This discrepancy leads to the recommendation of a fixed factor for general use. The underlying
n
(9)
Where
7;

4 Biological effects of light
f light are listed in table 3 and according to todays evidence they are not elicited by exposure
g to the biological effects in table 3, the biological effective radiant quantity in equation (1) is indexed
accordingly by replacing the index biol by the respective index given in the same line of table 3.
N
assumptio for c = 0,00559 is an L = 200 cd/m
2
. The resulting relative error of kpupil(A) for an L from 10 to 1000 cd/m
2
remains
for A<75 below 10%. If the luminance distribution is not considerably different from experimental situation in [10], other
adapted luminances L may be included in approximation with the luminance dependent factor c(L) according to (9):
2
) lg ( lg ) ( L m L m m L c + + =
3 2 1
m1 = 0,00647
m2 = 0,000038;
m3 = 0,000184
4.1 General
Biological effects o
of the skin but by perception of ocular receptors. These receptors are mainly the melanopsin containing retinal
ganglion cells (also called intrinsic photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells, ipRGC). The receptors for vision, the
rods and cones, also have an impact on these effects, but exact interdependencies are not known sufficiently
yet.
Relatin
EXAMPLE Index ms is used to label the radiant quantity for melatonin suppression.
7
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
Table 3 Biological effects of light - index, range of spectral sensitivity with limit wavelengths
1
and
2
,
and wavelength of maximum sensitivity
max
see
chapter
biological effect index

1

nm

2

nm

max

nm
4.2 nocturnal suppression of melatonin ms 380 580 450
4.3 shifting of circadian
a
phase cp 380
b

580
b
450
b

4.4 change in circadian amplitude ca 380
b
580
b
450
b

4.5 activation with light ak 380
b
580
b
450
b

4.6 treatment of seasonal affective disorders (SAD) sad 380
c
780
c
555
c

a
In the German version of this prestandard, the term circadian is written identical to this version and analogous to scientific
literature while the German orthographical reference Duden spells zirkadian.
b
Since action spectra and limit wavelengths are not yet known for shifting circadian phase and amplitude as well as activation by
light, the values for melatonin suppression were used provisionally (see 4.3 and 4.4).
c
Since action spectra and limit wavelengths are not yet known for treatment of seasonal affective disorders, the values for the
spectral luminous efficiency function V() for photopic vision according to DIN 5031-3 were used provisionally (see 4.6).

4.2 Nocturnal melatonin suppression
The bases for describing the spectral sensitivity for melatonin suppression provide [2], [3] and [4].
Labelling of radiation quantities for suppression of melatonin is according to table 3 and equation (10):
( ) ( ) s X X


d
nm 580
nm 380
ms ms
2
1
=

=
=
(10)
Where
X
ms
is the effective radiant quantity for melatonin suppression
s
ms
() is the relative spectral sensitivity for melatonin suppression
Values for the action spectrum for suppression of melatonin s
ms
() at a given wavelength are listed in table 4.
Data in [2] and [3] were determined from dark adapted volunteers at nocturnal maximum of melatonin release
and with pharmaceutically dilated pupils.
8
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
Table 4 Action spectrum for nocturnal suppression of melatonin s
ms
() in relation to wavelength

nm
s
ms
()


nm
s
ms
()
nm
s
ms
()
380 0,002 450 1,000 520 0,378
385 0,004 455 0,997 525 0,312
390 0,011 460 0,994 530 0,249
395 0,024 465 0,987 535 0,192
400 0,063 470 0,972 540 0,142
405 0,128 475 0,946 545 0,101
410 0,231 480 0,907 550 0,073
415 0,355 485 0,854 555 0,055
420 0,486 490 0,793 560 0,04
425 0,615 495 0,727 565 0,027
430 0,737 500 0,658 570 0,017
435 0,850 505 0,588 575 0,011
440 0,949 510 0,517 580 0,007
445 0,987 515 0,447

NOTE 1 The action spectrum for nocturnal suppression of melatonin s
ms
() as given in table 4 is shown in
figure 1.

Wavelenght, (nm)
Figure 1 Action spectrum for nocturnal suppression of melatonin s
ms
()
NOTE 2 Biological action factors and age dependent correction factors for suppression of melatonin with
different illuminants according to DIN 5033-7 and CIE Report 15.2 are listed in table 5.
9
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
Table 5 Biological action factors for suppression of melatonin and age dependent correction factors
for lens transmittance using selected standard illuminants according to DIN 5033-7 and CIE-Report 15.2,
calculated according to 3.3 and 3.4 on the basis of table 4
Illuminant a
ms v
k
biol trans
(25) k
biol trans
(50) k
biol trans
(75)
Standard illuminant A (incandescent, T
f
=
2856 K)
0,376 1,000 0,773 0,527
Illuminant B (Sunlight) 0,759 1,000 0,741 0,473
Illuminant G (vacuum-incandescent) 0,267 1,000 0,790 0,554
Illuminant F10 of CIE (FL, T
f
= 5000 K) 0,654 1,000 0,724 0,446
Illuminant F11 of CIE (FL, T
f
= 4000 K) 0,522 1,000 0,726 0,451
Illuminant F12 if CIE (FL, T
f
= 3000 K) 0,342 1,000 0,733 0,468
Illuminant D50 (daylight T
f
= 5000 K) 0,749 1,000 0,745 0,480
Illuminant D55 (daylight T
f
= 5500 K) 0,820 1,000 0,740 0,472
Standard illuminant D65 (nat. daylight) 0,941 1,000 0,732 0,461
Illuminant D75 (daylight T
f
= 7500 K) 1,040 1,000 0,727 0,453
Illuminant P (petrol oil/candlelight) 0,167 1,000 0,811 0,590
Illuminant Xe (Xenon light) 0,918 1,000 0,731 0,459

The spectral characteristics of the illuminants in table 5 are defined in other standards. These are mainly
conventional light sources, while new applications make increasingly use of light emitting diodes (LED) with
colour temperatures between 2700 K and 7000 K and new fluorescent lamps with high colour temperatures.
Therefore, table 6 contains typical biological action factors and age dependent correction factors for such light
sources. The underlying spectral distributions of the light sources are given in table A.1.
Table 6 Biological action factors for suppression of melatonin and age dependent correction factors
for lens transmittance using different modern light sources according to 3.3 and 3.4 on the basis of table
4 and typical spectral characteristics of these light sources (see table A.1)
Illuminant a
ms v
k
biol
(25) k
biol
(50) k
biol
(75)
LED (T
f
= 3035 K) 0,341 1,000 0,768 0,511
LED (T
f
= 4250 K) 0,609 1,000 0,773 0,515
LED (T
f
= 5400 K) 0,740 1,000 0,745 0,470
LED (T
f
= 6535 K) 0,807 1,000 0,726 0,444
fluorescent lamp (T
f
= 8000 K) 0,981 1,000 0,718 0,434
fluorescent lamp (T
f
= 17000 K) 1,23 1,000
0,706
0,414

NOTE Above mentioned white LEDs produce a light mixture, composed of a primary blue component produced by
electroluminescence in the semiconductor and a broad spectrum yellow component produced by an overlying fluorescent
layer that converts part of the primary blue component. The given LEDs differ in composition of fluorescent phosphors and in
spectrum of luminescence. LED types of different colour temperatures were gained e. g. by sorting of production output into
10
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
different classes (binning). Depending on the manufacturer and type, LEDs may have different light spectrum while producing
the same light colour. Values in table 6 and table A.1 should therefore be regarded as typical. Similar considerations apply
for fluorescent lamps. They may also have different spectral distributions leading to a comparable light colour. The values in
table 6 and A.1 may be seen as typical for recent fluorescent lamps with high colour temperatures.
4.3 Shifting of circadian phase
Humans own an inner clock, which - independently from external day-night-cycle - controls neuronal and
hormonal processes in a so called circadian rhythm. The circadian rhythm affects the daily schedule of sleep
and wake phases, release of melatonin and other hormones, and other physiological parameters of the
organism, like e. g. the body temperature. Light is capable of shifting the timing (phase) and changing the
strength (amplitude) of the circadian rhythm (see 4.4).
An action spectrum for shifting of the circadian phase is not available yet. Studies ([5]) suggest, that this action
spectrum is more likely to correspond with the action spectrum for melatonin suppression than with the spectral
luminous efficiency function V() for photopic vision according to DIN 5031-3. Therefore equation (11) is defined:
s
cp
() = s
ms
() (11)
NOTE With equation (11), tables 3 and 4 as well as figure 1 apply correspondingly.
4.4 Change in circadian amplitude
The amplitude of the circadian system is affected by light analogously to 4.3. In consequence, the nocturnal
melatonin release is dependent on the preceding daytime light exposure, generally speaking in leading to higher
melatonin release with more biologically effective light over the day. Though a respective action spectrum was
not subject of studies in this regard, it may be assumed that this effect is controlled through the same
photoreceptors as the melatonin suppression. The action spectrum for change in circadian amplitude is defined
by equation (12).
s
ca
() = s
ms
() (12)
NOTE With equation (12), tables 3 and 4 as well as figure 1 apply correspondingly.
4.5 Activation by light
Light exposure of the human retina increases subjective alertness. Such activating light effects have been
consistently shown also for objective physiological parameters.
An action spectrum for activation by light is not available yet. Studies (see [6]) suggest, that this action spectrum
is more likely to correspond with the action spectrum for melatonin suppression than with the spectral luminous
efficiency function V() for photopic vision according to DIN 5031-3. Therefore equation (13) is defined:
s
ak
() = s
ms
() (13)
NOTE With equation (13), tables 3 and 4 as well as figure 1 apply correspondingly.
4.6 Treatment of seasonal affective disorders (SAD)
Light therapy shows considerable healing success in patients with seasonal depressions (SAD). Such patients,
making up about 3 % of the population, show a higher sleep pressure, sense an increased need for
carbohydrates, feel sad and depressed, are often less productive, have higher error rates, tend to avoid contacts
and show increased morbidity. They are free of symptoms from spring to fall [8]. Additional 9 % of the population
([12]) sense a milder form of this interference and need no treatment (S-SAD). In total, 25 % of the general
population feel seasonal variations in their mental state and behaviour [11].
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DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
An action spectrum for treatment of seasonal affective disorders (SAD) with light is not available yet. Studies
(see [7]) up to now do not support an action spectrum differing from the spectral luminous efficiency function
V() for photopic vision according to DIN 5031-3. Therefore equation (14) is defined:
s
SAD
() = V() (14)
NOTE With equation (14), the biological action factor is aSAD = 1. Age dependent correction factors can not be
determined because the age distribution underlying V() is undetermined.
12
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
Annex A
(informative)

Spectral energy distribution of modern light sources
Since spectral energy distributions of modern light sources which were used increasingly in new applications are
not defined in existing standards, typical spectral energy distributions of such sources were listed in table A.1.
These light sources are white light emitting diodes (LEDs) and white fluorescent lamps (FL) with high colour
temperatures.
Table A.1 standardized spectral energy distributions of modern light sources
Wavelength

LED white
(T
f
= 3075 K)
LED white
(T
f
= 4250 K)
LED white
(T
f
= 5400 K)
LED white
(T
f
= 6535 K)
FL
(T
f
= 8000 K)
FL
(T
f
= 13650 K)
385 0,00279 0,00223 0,00306 0,00389 0,00162 0,00322
390 0,00273 0,00254 0,00428 0,00519 0,00137 0,00280
395 0,00355 0,00284 0,00700 0,00753 0,00197 0,00365
400 0,00431 0,00395 0,01198 0,01062 0,00881 0,00832
405 0,00571 0,00639 0,01921 0,01458 0,15859 0,23883
410 0,00796 0,01212 0,02445 0,02104 0,03510 0,05707
415 0,01151 0,02333 0,03040 0,03386 0,04722 0,07620
420 0,01945 0,03485 0,04519 0,06092 0,07475 0,11915
425 0,03504 0,03721 0,07721 0,11635 0,10985 0,17100
430 0,06363 0,03682 0,13273 0,21961 0,14975 0,22489
435 0,11094 0,04798 0,21972 0,38938 0,62879 0,79086
440 0,18326 0,07696 0,34348 0,65384 0,26263 0,31015
445 0,28533 0,13556 0,51017 0,95582 0,23308 0,32914
450 0,41372 0,24970 0,72708 1,00000 0,24066 0,33047
455 0,53846 0,46596 0,94118 0,73017 0,23636 0,31742
460 0,57621 0,77866 1,00000 0,48996 0,22146 0,29163
465 0,49359 1,00000 0,84314 0,36248 0,20076 0,25834
470 0,37480 0,94030 0,61742 0,26339 0,17551 0,22139
475 0,29504 0,72641 0,46575 0,19500 0,14949 0,18441
480 0,24369 0,57078 0,36739 0,16581 0,14091 0,16937
485 0,20349 0,47360 0,28794 0,15694 0,25126 0,30377
490 0,18140 0,38642 0,23878 0,16724 0,27273 0,28620
495 0,17744 0,32459 0,22212 0,19700 0,18333 0,19724
500 0,19229 0,29861 0,22650 0,23881 0,10783 0,12263
505 0,22504 0,29604 0,25138 0,28533 0,07121 0,05756
510 0,27813 0,30863 0,29608 0,33102 0,07475 0,03797
515 0,34373 0,34045 0,34814 0,37435 0,07551 0,02839
520 0,41545 0,38289 0,40315 0,41125 0,06338 0,02198
13
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
Table A.1 standardized spectral energy distributions of modern light sources (continued)
Wavelength

LED white
(T
f
= 3075 K)
LED white
(T
f
= 4250 K)
LED white
(T
f
= 5400 K)
LED white
(T
f
= 6535 K)
FL
(T
f
= 8000 K)
FL
(T
f
= 13650 K)
525 0,48903 0,42924 0,45448 0,43975 0,05051 0,01773
530 0,56274 0,47358 0,49855 0,46437 0,04470 0,01687
535 0,62960 0,51656 0,53608 0,48167 0,07045 0,06664
540 0,69388 0,55621 0,56593 0,49369 0,51768 0,55599
545 0,75348 0,58945 0,58795 0,50279 1,00000 1,00000
550 0,80389 0,61547 0,60230 0,50477 0,31313 0,43139
555 0,84987 0,63883 0,61410 0,50737 0,08485 0,09762
560 0,88812 0,65452 0,62072 0,50384 0,02189 0,02126
565 0,92148 0,66565 0,62239 0,49709 0,01328 0,01298
570 0,94963 0,67483 0,61776 0,48850 0,01298 0,01081
575 0,97034 0,67945 0,61173 0,47673 0,05934 0,05156
580 0,98623 0,67862 0,60241 0,46381 0,15909 0,14310
585 0,99456 0,67617 0,59063 0,44621 0,22096 0,20526
590 1,00000 0,66881 0,57431 0,42804 0,16389 0,18086
595 0,99827 0,65995
0,55567
0,40824 0,07727 0,08945
600 0,99449 0,64711 0,53523 0,38622 0,05303 0,04848
605 0,98397 0,63067 0,51217 0,36341 0,05455 0,02871
610 0,96953 0,61540 0,48765 0,33992 0,54798 0,41324
615 0,95463 0,59512 0,46217 0,31753 0,30051 0,21654
620 0,92884 0,57215 0,43471 0,29255 0,17197 0,12195
625 0,90683 0,55041 0,40832 0,27058 0,10833 0,11627
630 0,87922 0,52903 0,38049 0,24851 0,09823 0,10391
635 0,84740 0,50259 0,35234 0,22721 0,02601 0,02135
640 0,81410 0,47860 0,32627 0,20718 0,01548 0,01868
645 0,77851 0,45139 0,29980 0,18868 0,02035 0,02062
650 0,74122 0,42396 0,27557 0,17069 0,03283 0,02469
655 0,70329 0,39940 0,25285 0,15424 0,01629 0,01536
660 0,66480 0,37217 0,22994 0,13828 0,01788 0,01942
665 0,62393 0,34642 0,21038 0,12423 0,02013 0,02306
670 0,58398 0,32239 0,19114 0,11219 0,01657 0,01201
675 0,54410 0,29835 0,17251 0,09952 0,01490 0,01294
680 0,50575 0,27576 0,15555 0,08922 0,01626 0,01361
685 0,46780 0,25414 0,14041 0,07942 0,01636 0,01463
690 0,43188 0,23290 0,12613 0,07079 0,01369 0,01637
695 0,39524 0,21278 0,11293 0,06316 0,00793 0,00925
700 0,36301 0,19454 0,10171 0,05613 0,00543 0,00320
705 0,32945 0,17579 0,09131 0,04997 0,04167 0,02303
710 0,30008 0,15937 0,08212 0,04435 0,05051 0,04107
715 0,27206 0,14528 0,07326 0,03870 0,01033 0,01133
14
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
Table A.1 standardized spectral energy distributions of modern light sources (continued)
Wavelength

LED white
(T
f
= 3075 K)
LED white
(T
f
= 4250 K)
LED white
(T
f
= 5400 K)
LED white
(T
f
= 6535 K)
FL
(T
f
= 8000 K)
FL
(T
f
= 13650 K)
720 0,24613 0,13068 0,06572 0,03457 0,00205 0,00178
725 0,22180 0,11705 0,05881 0,03067 0,00179 0,00155
730 0,19979 0,10572 0,05178 0,02673 0,00150 0,00135
735 0,17836 0,09559 0,04599 0,02415 0,00108 0,00094
740 0,16042 0,08499 0,04134 0,02148 0,00194 0,00118
745 0,14296 0,07572 0,03688 0,01889 0,00136 0,00172
750 0,12926 0,06832 0,03266 0,01670 0,00080 0,00074
755 0,11567 0,06060 0,02944 0,01484 0,00210 0,00050
760 0,10331 0,05467 0,02626 0,01273 0,00874 0,01244
765 0,09171 0,04888 0,02318 0,01116 0,00111 0,00048
770 0,08230 0,04320 0,02078 0,00999 0,00161 0,00247
775 0,07288 0,03888 0,01866 0,00951 0,00040 0,00073
780 0,06790 0,03550 0,01181 0,00833 0,00021 0,00026

15
DIN V 5031-100:2009-03
16
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